1. Does abdominal massage relieve constipation?

Nurs Times. 2011 Mar 29-Apr 4;107(12):20-2.

McClurg D, Lowe-Strong A.

Source

Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, USA.

Abstract

Background

Abdominal massage has been used to treat constipation since the 19th century, yet questions remain over its effectiveness and which patient groups benefit from it the most.

Aim

To determine whether abdominal massage is effective for the relief of constipation.

Method

A review of observational studies, case reports and randomised controlled trials was carried out to determine whether abdominal massage is effective in relieving constipation.

Results

Abdominal massage can relieve constipation of various physiological causes. It stimulates peristalsis, decreases colonic transit time and increases the frequency of bowel movements. It also reduces discomfort and pain, induces.

Conclusion

Abdominal massage should be considered when treating patients with constipation. It has no adverse side-effects and can easily be taught to patients and carers so they can undertake it themselves.

PMID: 21520798

[PubMed - in process]

 

2. Using massage to ease constipation.

Nurs Times. 2011 Feb 1-7;107(4):26-7.

Lämås K.

Source

Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.

Abstract

Background

Constipation is a painful and serious condition that patients often find difficult to talk about. It is usually treated with laxatives alone.

Aim

To determine whether abdominal massage is an effective treatment for constipation. METHOD Of 60 people with constipation, half received 15 minutes of abdominal and hand massage a day, five days a week, for eight weeks, as well as prescribed laxatives. The rest received prescribed laxatives only. Interviews with participants were also conducted.

Results

Abdominal massage used with laxatives reduced abdominal pain, increased bowel movements and improved quality of life compared with laxative use alone. Patients reported positive experiences of abdominal massage but it did not reduce their laxative use.

Conclusion

Abdominal massage was seen as a pleasant treatment that can be offered as an option in constipation management.

PMID: 21366030

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

3. The effects of abdominal meridian massage on constipation among CVA patients.

 

 Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi. 2005 Feb;35(1):135-42.

Jeon SY, Jung HM. [Article in Korean]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15778565

 

Source

Dong-eui Medical Center, Korea.

Abstract

Purpose

This study was aimed at developing an efficient nursing method for the management of constipation by comparing the effects of abdominal meridian massage on the symptoms of constipation.

Method

The subjects were determined by the Rome II criteria and the Constipation Assessment Scale from Aug 30 through Sep 26, 2002. They were randomly divided into two groups: one experimental group of 16, another control group of 15. Abdominal meridian massage was given to the experimental group and no massage was given to the control group. The frequency of defecation and severity of constipation by CAS were measured. The data was analyzed with the t-test, chi(2)-test, and repeated measures ANOVA.

Results

There was a significant improvement in frequency of defecation, and severity of constipation in the experimental group compared to the control group.

Conclusion

Abdominal meridian massage can be considered an effective nursing method for the management of constipation among CVA patients.

PMID: 15778565

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Abdominal massage for the alleviation of constipation symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled feasibility study.

McClurg D, Hagen S, Hawkins S, Lowe-Strong A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20940182

 

Source

Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK. Doreen.mcclurg@gcal.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Constipation affects many people with multiple sclerosis (MS), negatively impacting on their quality of life. The use of abdominal massage has been reported in several populations and has been shown to increase the frequency of defaecation.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of undertaking abdominal massage in people with MS.

METHODS:

Following ethical approval, 30 patients with MS and constipation were recruited. After providing informed written consent and completion of baseline outcome measures, participants were randomly allocated to a massage group or a control group. The massage group participants were provided with advice on bowel management, and they or their carers were taught how to deliver abdominal massage and were recommended to perform it daily during the 4-week intervention period. The control group received bowel management advice only. Outcomes were measured pre (Week 0) and post treatment (Week 4), and at Week 8 and included: the Constipation Scoring System (CSS) (primary outcome), the Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction Score, and a bowel diary.

RESULTS:

Both groups demonstrated a decrease in CSS score from Week 0 to Week 4, indicating an improvement in constipation symptoms; however, the massage group improved significantly more than the control groups (mean difference between groups in score change -5.0 (SD 1.5), 95% CI -8.1, -1.8; t = -3.28, df = 28, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSION:

The results of this small study suggest a positive effect of the intervention on the symptoms of constipation, and support the feasibility of a substantive trial of abdominal massage for the alleviation of the symptoms of constipation in people with MS.

PMID: 20940182

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Abdominal massage for people with constipation: a cost utility analysis.

Lämås K, Lindholm L, Engström B, Jacobsson C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20557387

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se

Abstract

AIM:

This paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate change in health-related quality of life for people with constipation receiving abdominal massage and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two alternative scenarios developed from the original trial.

BACKGROUND:

Constipation is a common problem and is associated with decrease in quality of life. Abdominal massage appears to decrease the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, but its impact on health-related quality of life has not been assessed.

METHODS:

A randomized controlled trial including 60 participants was conducted in Sweden between 2005 and 2007. The control group continued using laxatives as before and the intervention group received additional abdominal massage. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D and analyzed with linear regression. Two scenarios were outlined to conduct a cost utility analysis. In the self-massage scenario patients learned to give self-massage, and in the professional massage scenario patients in hospital received abdominal massage from an Enrolled Nurse.

RESULTS:

Linear regression analysis showed that health-related quality of life was statistically significantly increased after 8 weeks of abdominal massage. About 40% were estimated to receive good effect. For 'self-massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro75,000 for the first 16 weeks. For every additional week of abdominal massage, the average dropped and eventually approached euro8300. For 'professional massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro60,000 and eventually dropped to euro28,000.

CONCLUSION:

Abdominal massage may be cost-effective in the long-term and it is relevant to consider it when managing constipation. A crucial aspect will be to identify those who will benefit.

PMID: 20557387

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Effects of abdominal massage in management of constipation--a randomized controlled trial.

Lämås K, Lindholm L, Stenlund H, Engström B, Jacobsson C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19217105

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Associated with decreases in quality of life, constipation is a relatively common problem. Abdominal massage appears to increase bowel function, but unlike laxatives with no negative side effects. Because earlier studies have methodological flaws and cannot provide recommendations, more research is needed.

OBJECTIVE:

This study investigates the effects of abdominal massage on gastrointestinal functions and laxative intake in people who have constipation.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHOD:

A sample of 60 people with constipation was included and randomized in two groups. The intervention group received abdominal massage in addition to an earlier prescribed laxative and the control group received only laxatives according to earlier prescriptions. Gastrointestinal function was assessed with Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale (GSRS) on three occasions; at baseline, week 4 and week 8. The statistical methods included linear regression, Wilcoxon sign rank test, and Mann-Whitney U-test.

RESULT:

Abdominal massage significantly decreased severity of gastrointestinal symptoms assessed with GSRS according to total score (p=.003), constipation syndrome (p=.013), and abdominal pain syndrome (p=.019). The intervention group also had significant increase of bowel movements compared to the control group (p=.016). There was no significant difference in the change of the amount of laxative intake after 8 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS:

Abdominal massage decreased severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, especially constipation and abdominal pain syndrome, and increased bowel movements. The massage did not lead to decrease in laxative intake, a result that indicates that abdominal massage could be a complement to laxatives rather than a substitute.

PMID: 19217105

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. The effect of abdominal massage on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury.

Ayaş S, Leblebici B, Sözay S, Bayramoğlu M, Niron EA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17117000

 

Source

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Başkent University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the effect of abdominal massage on clinical aspects of bowel dysfunction and colonic transit time in patients with spinal cord injury. Twenty-four patients were placed on a standard bowel program (phase I), after which abdominal massage was added to the regimen (phase II). Parameters of gastrointestinal system function and colonic transit times were evaluated.

DESIGN:

Uncontrolled clinical study.

RESULTS:

Eleven (45.8%) of the 24 patients had abdominal distention, and 10 (41.7%) had fecal incontinence in phase I; corresponding results for phase II were three (12.5%) and four (16.7%) (P = 0.008 and 0.031, respectively). There were no significant differences between the proportions of patients with difficult intestinal evacuation or abdominal pain or in mean time required for bowel evacuation in phase I vs. phase II. The mean frequencies of defecation in phases I and II were 3.79 +/- 2.15 (2.75-4.55) and 4.61 +/- 2.17 (3.67-5.54) bowel movements per week, respectively (P = 0.006). Mean total colonic transit time decreased from 90.60 +/- 32.67 (75.87-110.47) hrs in phase I to 72 +/- 34.10 (58.49-94.40) hrs in phase II (P = 0.035).

CONCLUSIONS:

Abdominal massage has positive effects on some clinical aspects of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

PMID: 17117000

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Managing a patient's constipation with physical therapy.

Harrington KL, Haskvitz EM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17079751

 

Source

Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery, Washington, DC 20307, USA. kendra.harrington@na.amedd.army.mil

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Constipation is a prevalent condition in the United States, with typical treatment consisting of diet modification, stool softeners, and laxatives. These interventions, however, are not always effective. The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of abdominal massage in physical therapist management for a patient with constipation.

CASE DESCRIPTION:

An 85-year-old woman with constipation was referred for physical therapy following unsuccessful treatment with stool softeners. The patient was instructed in bowel management as well as a daily, 10-minute home abdominal massage program.

OUTCOMES:

Upon re-examination, the patient reported a return of normal bowel frequency and function without the need to strain or use digital evacuation.

DISCUSSION:

Physical therapy incorporating abdominal massage appeared to be helpful in resolving this patient's constipation. Unlike medical management of constipation, no known side effects have been identified with abdominal massage.

PMID: 17079751

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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9. Comparison and analysis on therapeutic effects of acupuncture plus massage therapy and drug on infantile diarrhea.

[Article in Chinese]

Wang XF, Teng X.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16312888

 

Source

Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning College of TCM, Shenyang 110032, China. Inzywxf@tom.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare therapeutic effects of acupuncture plus massage therapy and western medicine on infantile diarrhea.

METHODS:

A total of 120 cases of infantile diarrhea were randomly divided into a treatment group of 80 cases and a control group of 40 cases. The treatment group were treated by acupuncture and massage therapy, and the control group by smecta.

RESULTS:

The cured rate of 55.0% in the treatment group was better than 35.0% in the control group (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Acupuncture plus massage therapy has obvious therapeutic effect on infantile diarrhea.

PMID: 16312888

[PubMed - in process]

 

10. A pilot study of the effectiveness of reflexology in treating idiopathic constipation in women.

Woodward S, Norton C, Barriball KL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20129409

 

Source

Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, 57 Waterloo Road, London, UK. sue.woodward@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Constipation is a common problem in the UK, affecting up to 20% of the population. Reflexologists claim that reflexology can be beneficial in the treatment of constipation. The aim of this exploratory pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of reflexology in treating idiopathic constipation in women and it is the first study of the effectiveness of reflexology for the treatment of women with idiopathic constipation defined according to Rome II criteria.

METHODS:

Nineteen female patients referred to a specialist biofeedback service with idiopathic constipation defined by Rome II criteria were recruited. A course of reflexology treatment (weekly for six weeks) was given. Patients' subjective perception of constipation was recorded as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), the Short form 36 (SF36), whole gut transit and the Holistic Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (HCAMQ) before and after the intervention.

RESULTS:

All participants completed the intervention and none were lost to follow-up. Ninety-four percent of participants identified their constipation to be improved to some extent. Ten participants had improved colonic transit times and two patients had normalised colonic transit. Ten patients (53%, p=0.19) demonstrated an improved anxiety score and 11 participants (58%, p=0.14) demonstrated an improved depression score on the HAD scales. Improvement was seen in general health, mental health and vitality on the SF36 scale, with vitality improving significantly (p<0.05). Sixty-three percent of participants had a more positive attitude (p=0.03) towards CAM and holistic health following treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study shows that in this sample reflexology has potential benefit for treating idiopathic constipation in women. Further randomised trials are required.

Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20129409

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]