1.    Effects of massage therapy on sleep quality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

 

Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2010;65(11):1105-10.

Nerbass FB, Feltrim MI, Souza SA, Ykeda DS, Lorenzi-Filho G.

Source

Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. fbnerbass@gmail.com

Abstract

Introduction

Having poor sleep quality is common among patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. Pain, stress, anxiety and poor sleep quality may be improved by massage therapy.

Objective

This study evaluated whether massage therapy is an effective technique for improving sleep quality in patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery.

Method

Participants included cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients who were randomized into a control group and a massage therapy group following discharge from the intensive care unit (Day 0), during the postoperative period. The control group and the massage therapy group comprised participants who were subjected to three nights without massage and three nights with massage therapy, respectively. The patients were evaluated on the following mornings (i.e., Day 1 to Day 3) using a visual analogue scale for pain in the chest, back and shoulders, in addition to fatigue and sleep. Participants kept a sleep diary during the study period.

Results

Fifty-seven cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients were enrolled in the study during the preoperative period, 17 of whom were excluded due to postoperative complications. The remaining 40 participants (male: 67.5%, age: 61.9 years ± 8.9 years, body mass index: 27.2 kg/m² ± 3.7 kg/m²) were randomized into control (n = 20) and massage therapy (n = 20) groups. Pain in the chest, shoulders, and back decreased significantly in both groups from Day 1 to Day 3. The participants in the massage therapy group had fewer complaints of fatigue on Day 1 (p=0.006) and Day 2 (p=0.028) in addition, they reported a more effective sleep during all three days (p=0.019) when compared with the participants in the control group.

Conclusions

Massage therapy is an effective technique for improving patient recovery from cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery because it reduces fatigue and improves sleep.

PMID: 21243280

PubMed - in process

 

2.    Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension after cardiac surgery: a randomized study

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2010 May;16(2):70-5. Epub 2009 Jul 14.

Bauer BA, Cutshall SM, Wentworth LJ, Engen D, Messner PK, Wood CM, Brekke KM, Kelly RF, Sundt TM 3rd.

Source

Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. bauer.brent@mayo.edu

Abstract

Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Cardiac surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back and shoulder pain, anxiety, and tension. Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, tension, and anxiety, we studied the efficacy and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative cardiovascular surgery setting. Patients were randomized to receive a massage or to have quiet relaxation time (control). In total, 113 patients completed the study (massage, n=62; control, n=51). Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain, anxiety, and tension. Patients were highly satisfied with the intervention, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Massage therapy may be an important component of the healing experience for patients after cardiovascular surgery.

Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:20347836

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

3.    Massage therapy after cardiac surgery

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2010 Autumn;22(3):225-9.

Wang AT, Sundt TM 3rd, Cutshall SM, Bauer BA.

Source

Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minneosta, USA.

Abstract

Cardiac surgery presents a life-saving and life-enhancing opportunity to hundreds of thousands of patients each year in the United States. However, many patients face significant challenges during the postoperative period, including pain, anxiety, and tension. Mounting evidence demonstrates that such challenges can impair immune function and slow wound healing, in addition to causing suffering for the patient. Finding new approaches to mitigate these challenges is necessary if patients are to experience the full benefits of surgery. Massage therapy is a therapy that has significant evidence to support its role in meeting these needs. This paper looks at the data surrounding the use of massage therapy in cardiac surgery patients, with a special focus on the experience at Mayo Clinic.

PMID: 21167456

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

4.The effect of chair massage on muscular discomfort in cardiac sonographers: a pilot study.

Engen DJ, Wahner-Roedler DL, Nadolny AM, Persinger CM, Oh JK, Spittell PC, Loehrer LL, Cha SS, Bauer BA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20846441

 

Source

Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. wahnerroedler.dietlind@mayo.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cardiac sonographers frequently have work-related muscular discomfort. We aimed to assess the feasibility of having sonographers receive massages during working hours in an area adjacent to an echocardiography laboratory and to assess relief of discomfort with use of the massages with or without stretching exercises.

METHODS:

A group of 45 full-time sonographers was randomly assigned to receive weekly 30-minute massage sessions, massages plus stretching exercises to be performed twice a day, or no intervention. Outcome measures were scores of the QuickDASH instrument and its associated work module at baseline and at 10 weeks of intervention. Data were analyzed with standard descriptive statistics and the separation test for early-phase comparative trials.

RESULTS:

Forty-four participants completed the study: 15 in the control group, 14 in the massage group, and 15 in the massage plus stretches group. Some improvement was seen in work-related discomfort by the QuickDASH scores and work module scores in the 2 intervention groups. The separation test showed separation in favor of the 2 interventions.

CONCLUSION:

On the basis of the results of this pilot study, larger trials are warranted to evaluate the effect of massages with or without stretching on work-related discomfort in cardiac sonographers.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

NCT00975026 ClinicalTrials.gov.

PMID:

20846441

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2949737

 

5. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients: a pilot study.

Cutshall SM, Wentworth LJ, Engen D, Sundt TM, Kelly RF, Bauer BA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347840

 

Source

Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the role of massage therapy in the cardiac surgery postoperative period. Specific aims included determining the difference in pain, anxiety, tension, and satisfaction scores of patients before and after massage compared with patients who received standard care.

DESIGN:

A randomized controlled trial comparing outcomes before and after intervention in and across groups.

SETTING:

Saint Marys Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

SUBJECTS:

Patients undergoing cardiovascular surgical procedures (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valvular repair or replacement) (N=58).

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients in the intervention group received a 20-minute session of massage therapy intervention between postoperative days 2 and 5. Patients in the control group received standard care and a 20-minute quiet time between postoperative days 2 and 5.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Linear Analogue Self-assessment scores for pain, anxiety, tension, and satisfaction.

RESULTS:

Statistically and clinically significant decreases in pain, anxiety, and tension scores were observed for patients who received a 20-minute massage compared with those who received standard care. Patient feedback was markedly positive.

CONCLUSIONS:

This pilot study showed that massage can be successfully incorporated into a busy cardiac surgical practice. These results suggest that massage may be an important therapy to consider for inclusion in the management of postoperative recovery of cardiovascular surgical patients.

Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20347840

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Massage therapy reduces tension, anxiety, and pain in patients awaiting invasive cardiovascular procedures.

Wentworth LJ, Briese LJ, Timimi FK, Sanvick CL, Bartel DC, Cutshall SM, Tilbury RT, Lennon R, Bauer BA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20002340

 

Source

Department of Nursing Administration, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. wentworth.laura@mayo.edu

Abstract

Objectives: (1) To assess the efficacy of a 20 minute massage therapy session on pain, anxiety, and tension in patients before an invasive cardiovascular procedure. (2) To assess overall patient satisfaction with the massage therapy. (3) To evaluate the feasibility of integrating massage therapy into preprocedural practices. Experimental pretest-posttest design using random assignment. Medical cardiology progressive care units at a Midwestern Academic Medical Center. Patients (N=130) undergoing invasive cardiovascular procedures. The intervention group received 20 minutes of hands on massage at least 30 minutes before an invasive cardiovascular procedure. Control group patients received standard preprocedural care. Visual analogue scales were used to collect verbal numeric responses measuring pain, anxiety, and tension pre- and postprocedure. The differences between pre- and postprocedure scores were compared between the massage and standard therapy groups using the Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon's test. Scores for pain, anxiety, and tension scores were identified along with an increase in satisfaction for patients who received a 20-minute massage before procedure compared with those receiving standard care. This pilot study showed that massage can be incorporated into medical cardiovascular units' preprocedural practice and adds validity to prior massage studies.

PMID: 20002340

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. A randomized trial of massage therapy after heart surgery.

Albert NM, Gillinov AM, Lytle BW, Feng J, Cwynar R, Blackstone EH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19944872

 

Source

Nursing Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether massage therapy improves postoperative mood, pain, anxiety, and physiologic measurements; shortens hospital stay; and decreases occurrence of atrial fibrillation.

METHODS:

Two hundred fifty-two adults undergoing cardiac surgery were randomized to usual postoperative care (n=126) or usual care plus two massages (n=126). Assessments of mood, depression, anxiety, pain, physiologic status, cardiac rhythm, and hospital length of stay were completed. Logistic and linear regressions were performed.

RESULTS:

Preoperative pain, mood, and affective state scores were positively associated with postoperative scores; however, there were no postoperative differences between groups for any measures (P=.11 to .93). There were no differences in physiologic variables except lower postoperative blood pressure after massage (P = .01). Postoperative atrial fibrillation occurrence (P = .6) and median postoperative hospital length of stay (P = .4) were similar between groups.

CONCLUSION:

Massage therapy is feasible in cardiac surgical patients; however, it does not yield therapeutic benefit. Nevertheless, it should be a patient-selected and -paid option.

Comment in

PMID: 19944872

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Effects of manual lymph drainage on cardiac autonomic tone in healthy subjects.

Kim SJ, Kwon OY, Yi CH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19922342

 

Source

Department of Physical Therapy, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do, 245-711, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the effects of manual lymph drainage on the cardiac autonomic tone. Thirty-two healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to manual lymph drainage (MLD) (experimental) and rest (control) groups. Electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters were recorded with bipolar electrocardiography using standard limb lead positions. The pressure-pain threshold (PPT) was quantitatively measured using an algometer. Heart rate variability differed significantly between the experimental and control groups (p < 0.05), but the PPT in the upper trapezius muscle did not (p > 0.05). These findings indicate that the application of MLD was effective in reducing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system.

PMID: 19922342

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

9. The effect of deep-tissue massage therapy on blood pressure and heart rate.

Kaye AD, Kaye AJ, Swinford J, Baluch A, Bawcom BA, Lambert TJ, Hoover JM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18315516

 

Source

Department of Anesthesiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. akaye@lsuhsc.edu

Abstract

AIM:

In the present study, we describe the effects of deep tissue massage on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study involved 263 volunteers (12% males and 88% females), with an average age of 48.5. Overall muscle spasm/muscle strain was described as either moderate or severe for each patient. Baseline blood pressure and heart rate were measured via an automatic blood pressure cuff. Twenty-one (21) different soothing CDs played in the background as the deep tissue massage was performed over the course of the study. The massages were between 45 and 60 minutes in duration. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with post-hoc Scheffe's F-test.

RESULTS:

Results of the present study demonstrated an average systolic pressure reduction of 10.4 mm Hg (p<0.06), a diastolic pressure reduction of 5.3 mm Hg (p<0.04), a mean arterial pressure reduction of 7.0 mm Hg (p<0.47), and an average heart rate reduction of 10.8 beats per minute (p<0.0003), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Additional scientific research in this area is warranted.

PMID: 18315516

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. Massage therapy: a comfort intervention for cardiac surgery patients.

Anderson PG, Cutshall SM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17495551

 

Source

Thoracic/Vascular Intensive Care Unit, St. Mary's Hospital-Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. anderson.patricia4@mayo.edu

Abstract

Integrative therapies have gained support in the literature as a method to control pain and anxiety. Many institutions have integrated massage therapy into their programs. Few studies have looked at the specific benefits of massage therapy for cardiac surgical patients. These patients undergo long surgical procedures and often complain of back, shoulder, and neck pain or general stress and tension. Clinical nurse specialist identify the benefits for patients and bring the evidence on massage therapy to the clinical setting. This article will provide an overview of the benefits of massage in the reduction of pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients. Reports of benefits seen with integration of massage in 1 cardiac surgical unit as part of evidence-based practice initiative for management of pain will be described. A clinical case example of a patient who has experienced cardiac surgery and received massage therapy will be shared.

PMID: 17495551

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

11. Effects of Swedish massage on blood pressure.

Aourell M, Skoog M, Carleson J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16290894

 

Source

School of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Novum, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Swedish massage technique includes mechanically activated muscular tissue and also skin, tendons, fascias, and connected tissue, which indirectly regulates the tonus of the autonomous nervous system. This study set out to examine the effects of Swedish massage on blood pressure. Healthy males were given massage treatment at the Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Treatment was over a 12-week period divided into three parts, each consisting of 4 weeks. Two treatment periods contained massage treatment either on back, neck and chest (BNC), or leg, arm and face (LAF), with an in between washout period. The first treatment period with massage decreased systolic blood pressure directly after treatment (BNC: P<0.005, LAF: P<0.01), but no significant changes were seen in diastolic blood pressure. In the second period, BNC massage decreased systolic (P<0.005) and diastolic (P<0.005) blood pressure whereas LAF massage (P<0.05) increased systolic blood pressure. Swedish massage on the BNC resulted in a minor decrease in blood pressure possibly due to sympathetic inhibition. It may be suggested that massage may be tried as a complementary therapy in patients suffering from increased blood pressure due to stress.

PMID: 16290894

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

12. The effect of compressed air massage on skin blood flow and temperature.

Mars M, Maharaj SS, Tufts M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16211126

 

Source

Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Abstract

AIM:

Compressed air massage is a new treatment modality that uses air under pressure to massage skin and muscle. It is claimed to improve skin blood flow but this has not been verified. Several pilot studies were undertaken to determine the effects of compressed air massage on skin blood flow and temperature.

METHODS:

Skin blood flow (SBF), measured using laser Doppler fluxmetry and skin temperature was recorded under several different situations: (i) treatment, at 1 Bar pressure using a single-hole (5-mm) applicator head, for 1 min at each of several sites on the right and left lower legs, with SBF measured on the dorsum of the left foot; (ii) at the same treatment pressure, SBF was measured over the left tibialis anterior when treatment was performed at different distances from the probe; (iii) SBF and skin temperature of the lower leg were measured with treatment at 0 or 1 Bar for 45 min, using two different applicator heads; (iv) SBF was measured on the dorsum of the foot of 10 subjects with treatment for 1 min at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Bar using three different applicator heads.

RESULTS:

(i) SBF of the left foot was not altered by treatment of the right leg or chest, but was significantly increased during treatment of the left sole and first web, p < 0.0001. (ii) SBF over the tibialis anterior was increased when treatment was 5 cm from the probe, p < 0.0001, but not when 10 cm away. iii) SBF was significantly elevated throughout the 45-min treatments at 1 Bar and returned to normal within 1 min of stopping treatment. Skin temperature fell by 6.8 degrees C and 4.3 degrees C after 45-min treatments at 1 Bar, and slight rewarming occurred within 15 min. At 0 Bar, no change in SBF or temperature was noted. (iv) A near-linear increase in SBF was noted with increasing treatment pressure for two of the three applicator heads.

CONCLUSION:

Compressed air massage causes an immediate increase in SBF, and an immediate fall in SBF when treatment is stopped. The effect appears to be locally and not centrally mediated and is related to the pressure used. Treatment cools the skin for at least 15 min after a 45-min treatment.

PMID: 16211126

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

13. Effects of foot reflexology on essential hypertension patients].

[Article in Korean]

Park HS, Cho GY.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15502439

 

Source

Department ot Nursing, Pusan National University, Psan 602-739, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was to evaluate the effects of foot reflexology on blood pressure, serum lipids level and life satisfaction in essential hypertension patients.

METHOD:

The research design used was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Foot Reflexology was used as the experimental treatment from June 23rd, 2003 until August 31st, 2003. Thirty-four subjects were assigned to an experimental group(18) and control group(16). Foot Reflexology was administered twice a week for 6 weeks and self foot Reflexology was administered twice a week for 4 weeks on the experimental group.

RESULT:

There was a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure but no significant decrease in diastolic pressure in the experimental group compared to the control group. The total cholesterol level in the experimental group compared to the control group was not significantly decreased after foot reflexology. However, the triglyceride level in the experimental group compared to the control group was significantly decreased after foot reflexology. On the other hand, high density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein levels in the experimental group compared to the control group was not significantly decreased after foot reflexology. Life satisfaction in the experimental group compared to the control group was significantly improved after foot reflexology.

CONCLUSION:

The results proved that foot reflexology was an effective nursing intervention to decrease systolic pressure, and triglyceride but not for the blood cholesterol and to improve life satisfaction. Therefore, blood cholesterol should be further evaluated in a larger group of subjects and for a longer period. Further research is regarded as necessary to evaluate and to compare effects of self-foot reflexology and foot reflexology.

PMID: 15502439

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Massage therapy of moderate and light pressure and vibrator effects on EEG and heart rate.

Diego MA, Field T, Sanders C, Hernandez-Reif M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14660065

 

Source

University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33101, USA.

Abstract

Three types of commonly used massage therapy techniques were assessed in a sample of 36 healthy adults, randomly assigned to: (1) moderate massage, (2) light massage, or (3) vibratory stimulation group (n = 12 per group). Changes in anxiety and stress were assessed, and EEG and EKG were recorded. Anxiety scores decreased for all groups, but the moderate pressure massage group reported the greatest decrease in stress. The moderate massage group also experienced a decrease in heart rate and EEG changes including an increase in delta and a decrease in alpha and beta activity, suggesting a relaxation response. Finally, this group showed increased positive affect, as indicated by a shift toward left frontal EEG activation. The light massage group showed increased arousal, as indicated by decreased delta and increased deta activity and increased heart rate. The vibratory stimulation group also showed increased arousal, as indicated by increased heart rate and increased theta, alpha, and beta activity.

PMID: 14660065

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

15. Effect of oxygen baths and massage on hemodynamics in patients with neurocirculatory dystonia].

[Article in Russian]

Komarova LA, Zhiganova TI.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14650132

 

Abstract

56 patients with neurocirculatory asthenia (NCA) of a hypertensive and cardial type aged 30 to 55 years took general oxygen baths and collar zone massage, no drugs were used. The baths and the massage improved the disease course in 92.6% patients: improved hemodynamics, relieved high vascular resistance, lowered high diastolic blood pressure, decreased heart rate in tachycardia. More effective was the treatment in hypertensive NCA.

PMID: 14650132

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]