1.    Acupuncture and massage therapy for neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury: an exploratory study.

Acupunct Med. 2011 Apr 6. [Epub ahead of print]

Norrbrink C, Lundeberg T.

Source

1Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Objective

The study sought to explore the possibility of using acupuncture and massage therapy for relieving neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Design 30 individuals with SCI and neuropathic pain were assigned to treatment of either massage or acupuncture, with 15 individuals in each group. Both groups received treatment twice weekly for 6 weeks. Treatments were evaluated at the end of treatment and 2 months later (follow-up).

Results

Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Within the groups, ratings of present pain, general pain, pain unpleasantness and coping improved significantly at the end of treatment after acupuncture compared to baseline values, and following massage therapy ratings of pain interference on the Multidimensional Pain Inventory improved. At follow-up no significant improvements were seen. Between-group differences were seen regarding ratings of worst pain intensity at the end of treatment, and regarding pain unpleasantness and coping with pain at follow-up, both in favour of acupuncture. At the end of treatment, eight of the 15 individuals receiving acupuncture and nine receiving massage reported an improvement on the Patient Global Impression of Change Scale, and at follow-up six patients in the acupuncture group and one patient in the massage group still reported a favourable effect from the treatment. Few side effects were reported and neither dropout from the study did this due to adverse events.

Conclusion

Neuropathic pain following SCI is often only partially responsive to most interventions. Results from this study indicate, however, that both acupuncture and massage therapy may relieve SCI neuropathic pain. For this reason, larger randomised controlled trials are warranted for assessing the long-term effects of these treatments.

PMID: 21474490

PubMed - as supplied by publisher

 

2.      The effects of massage on pain, stiffness, and fatigue levels associated with ankylosing spondylitis: a case study.

Int J Ther Massage Bodywork. 2011 Mar 30;4(1):12-7.

Chunco R.

Source

Shamrock Therapeutics LLC, Plano, Texas, USA.

Abstract

Objectives

To study the effects of massage on pain, stiffness, and fatigue in a patient recently diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).

Methods

A 47-year-old woman with AS diagnosed 11 months earlier received 7 massages across a 28-day period. Her pain, stiffness, and fatigue were recorded using visual analogue scales daily during the study period. Spinal mobility was measured at each massage session with finger-to-floor measurements for both forward and lateral flexion. The client also used a daily journal to supply pertinent information on quality of life.

Results

Improvement was recorded in all dependent variables, with stiffness intensity showing the greatest improvement, to a final value of 0.75 from an initial value of 5. Duration of stiffness also showed improvement, to a final value of 1.2 from an initial value of 3.5. Improvement was also found in general pain (final value: 1; initial value: 4), fatigue (final value: 1.5; initial value 5), and forward and lateral flexion (forward flexion distance-final: 4 inches; initial: 6 inches; lateral flexion, left distance: final, 16.5 inches; initial, 21 inches; right distance: final, 16.5 inches; initial, 20.5 inches).

Conclusions

Massage shows promise as a treatment for symptoms associated with AS. Further study is needed to validate these effects and to determine the feasibility of massage as an adjunct to standard care for AS patients with mild-to-moderate symptoms of AS.

PMID: 21589691

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Physical therapy treatment options for lumbar spinal stenosis.

Tomkins CC, Dimoff KH, Forman HS, Gordon ES, McPhail J, Wong JR, Battié MC.

Source

Department of Physical Education and Recreation, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T3E 6K. ctomkins@mtroyal.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Given the dearth of high quality research on conservative treatment for spinal stenosis, an empirical understanding of the scope of physical therapy provided in the community can help focus research and build standards of care.

OBJECTIVES:

Provide preliminary insight into current physical therapy practice in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), from both patient and physical therapist perspectives.

METHODS:

Patients greater than 50 years of age with LSS diagnosed by a spine surgeon were recruited to participate in a telephone survey regarding treatment. Physical therapists were recruited to complete a survey regarding treatments offered to patients with LSS.

RESULTS:

Of the patients participating in the study (n=75), 44 (59%) reported receiving physical therapy treatment. Treatments most frequently reported by patients were massage (27%), strengthening exercises (23%), flexibility exercises (18%), and heat/ice (14%). The most frequently advocated treatments by the 76 physical therapists included flexibility (87%), stabilization (86%) and strengthening exercises (83%), followed by heat/ice (76%), acupuncture (63%) and joint mobilization (62%).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results can guide both clinical research priorities and standards of care for physical therapy treatments of LSS. Based on the results of this study, future research foci should include massage, flexibility and strengthening exercises, stabilization techniques and heat/ice treatments.

PMID: 20231787

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. The rehabilitation of facial involvement in systemic sclerosis: efficacy of the combination of connective tissue massage, Kabat's technique and kinesitherapy: a randomized controlled trial.

Maddali-Bongi S, Landi G, Galluccio F, Del Rosso A, Miniati I, Conforti ML, Casale R, Matucci-Cerinic M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20238221

 

Source

Department of Biomedicine, Division of Rheumatology, AOUC, Denothe Centre, University of Florence, Villa Monna Tessa, Viale Pieraccini 18, 50139, Florence, Italy.

Abstract

In Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), face involvement causes functional loss as well as aesthetic changes and loss of the self-image. The aim of the work is to evaluate the efficacy of a rehabilitation program based on the combination of Kabat's technique, connective massage and kinesitherapy specifically conceived for the face of SSc patients. Forty SSc patients were enrolled: 20 patients (interventional group) were treated for 9 weeks (twice a week, 1 h per session) with a combined connective tissue massage, Kabat's technique, kinesitherapy and home exercise program, and 20 patients (control group) were assigned only home exercise program. All patients were assessed at baseline (T0), at the end of the treatment (T1) and after 9 weeks of follow-up (T2). They were evaluated with SF-36, HAQ, modified Rodnan skin score, mouth opening in centimeters and Mouth Handicap in Systemic Sclerosis (MHISS) scale. At T1, both groups improved in mouth opening (P < 0.05), but the improvement was maintained at T2 only in interventional group. In interventional group, facial skin score ameliorated at T1 and maintained at T2 (P < 0.05 vs. T0), while no change was observed in controls. In both groups, SF-36 and HAQ were not affected by the treatment. MHISS scale improved significantly in interventional group at T1 (P < 0.001), while no change was found in controls. The combination of connective tissue massage, Kabat's technique, kinesitherapy and home-based exercises is more effective than a home exercise program alone in the rehabilitative treatment of SSc facial involvement.

PMID: 20238221

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

5. What is the efficacy of physical therapeutics for treating neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury patients?

Fattal C, Kong-A-Siou D, Gilbert C, Ventura M, Albert T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19909705

 

Source

Centre mutualiste neurologique, Propara, 263, rue du Caducée, 34090 Montpellier, France. c.fattal@propara.languedoc-mutualite.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Evaluate the place and level of proof of physical therapeutics for treating neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients.

METHOD:

Literature review from three databases: PubMed, Embase, Pascal. The following keywords were selected: chronic neuropathic pain/non-pharmacological treatment; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, physiotherapy, acupuncture, physical therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, heat therapy, ice therapy, cold therapy, massage, ultrasound, alternative treatment, complementary treatment, occupational therapy. The articles were analyzed using the double-reading mode.

RESULTS:

Three techniques emerge from the literature: magnetic or electrical transcranial stimulation, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture. Even though the first method is not easily accessible on a daily basis it is the one that yields the most promising results validated by Grade B studies. Healthcare professionals remain faithful to pain-relieving transcutaneous neurostimulation for both segmental neuropathic pain and below-level central neuropathic pain. Acupuncture is advocated by Canadian teams and could offer some interesting options; however, to this day, it does not have the methodological support and framework required to validate its efficacy. All other physical therapies are used in a random way. Only below-level massages are advocated by the patients themselves.

CONCLUSION:

To this day, no study can validate the integration of physical therapy as part of the array of therapeutics used for treating neuropathic pain in SCI patients. In the future, it will require controlled and randomized therapeutic studies on homogenous groups of SCI patients, to control the various confusion factors.

PMID: 19909705

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Controlled clinical trials on the Pizhen and massage for the treatment of thoracic lateral cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome].

[Article in Chinese]

Ying YR, Zhu RT, Ying YJ, Zhang DQ, Ying GH, Gao FM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19817193

 

Source

The Luqiao Branch of Taizhou Hospital, Taizhou 318050, Zhejiang, China. yyr-5560@163.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the clinical effects of Pizhen for the treatment of thoracic lateral cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome.

METHODS:

From March 2004 to April 2008, among the 320 patients with thoracic lateral cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, 160 patients (105 patients were male and 55 patients were female, ranging in age from 26 to 66 years, with an average of 46.00 +/- 0.79 years) were treated with Pizhen for 3 to 7 days, and 160 patients (98 patients were male and 62 patients were female, ranging in age from 19 to 64 years,with an average of 47.00 +/- 0.35 years) were treated with massage for 1 to 2 months. The therapeutic effects of the two groups were compared based on changes of tension test of local soft tissues, local pain and tenderness.

RESULTS:

All the patients were followed up and the duration ranged from 7 to 12 months, averaged in 10.3 months. Among the patients in Pizhen group, 119 patients got an excellent result, 27 good, 12 fair, and 2 poor, and the tension test of local soft tissues decreased from preoperative (3.68 +/- 0.28) to postoperative (2.13 +/- 0.35). In the control group, 73 patients got an excellent result, 38 good, 40 fair, and 9 poor, the tension test of local soft tissues decreased from preoperative (3.59 +/- 0.22) to postoperative (3.17 +/- 0.19). The therapeutic effects and tension test of local soft tissue in the two groups had statistical differences (P < 0.01). The therapeutic effects of Pizhen group was better than that of the control group, and the postoperative tension test of local soft tissues of patients in Pizhen group was lower than that of the control group.

CONCLUSION:

The clinical effect of Pizhen is better than the massage for the treatment of thoracic lateral cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome. The Pizhen is effective to decrease the pressure around nerve, relax the adhesion, so as to eliminate the stimulation and compression of sensory nerve endings to relieve the pain quickly. But massage need longer course of treatment. So Pizhen therapy is safe, good and easily to practice, which is better than massage therapy.

PMID: 19817193

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. Interdisciplinary palliative care, including massage, in treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Blatzheim K

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19761955

.

Source

Meridians-A Center for the Healing Arts, 321 Main Street, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA. kendrablatzheim@comcast.ne

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal neurological disease that affects approximately 20,000 Americans. Symptoms include muscle weakness, fatigue, twitching, atrophy, spasticity, pain, oropharyngeal dysfunction, pseudobulbar affect, weight loss, and respiratory impairment. Death occurs within 3-5 yr after onset of symptoms, with diagnosis taking from 11 to 17.5 months. The only FDA-approved drug for ALS is Riluzole, which only increases the life expectancy by a few months. All other treatments for ALS provide symptom management to improve the patient's quality of life. An interdisciplinary palliative care team for the ALS patient helps to reduce the stress that the illness places on families. Massage can be a useful adjunctive treatment for spasticity and pain when medication side effects are unwanted. A holistic interdisciplinary palliative care team supports both the patient and the family improving their quality of life.

PMID: 19761955

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

8. Reflexology treatment for patients with lower limb amputations and phantom limb pain--an exploratory pilot study.

Brown CA, Lido C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18396256

 

Source

Prosthetic Services, Maltings Mobility Centre, Wolverhampton City NHS Trust, Herbert Street, Wolverhampton, West Midlands WV1 1NQ, UK. tina.brown@wolvespct.nhs.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of the study were to evaluate the possibility of reflexology being used as a non-invasive form of phantom limb pain relief and of empowering patients to maintain any positive results with self-treatment.

SETTING:

Prosthetic Services Centre, Herbert Street, Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England.

DESIGN:

A same-subject, experimental pilot study, recording the intensity of phantom limb pain in weekly pain diaries over a 30-week period, which was divided into five phases: phase 1 gave a baseline of pain, whilst phase 3 was a resting phase. Phases 2, 4 and 5 provided the reflexology interventions.

SAMPLE:

Ten participants with unilateral lower limb amputations and phantom limb pain were selected from the database at the Prosthetic Centre. REFLEXOLOGY INTERVENTIONS: In phase 2, six weekly reflexology treatments were given, which consisted of: full foot reflexology to the remaining foot and full hand reflexology to the hand of the amputated side of the body. In phase 4, six weekly hand reflexology teaching sessions were carried out; patients copied on their own hands what the therapist did on hers. A hand reflexology booklet gave the sequence of the treatment and was used as a reference. In phase 5, the patients self-treated for 6 weeks at home, using the reference material.

RESULTS:

Over the 30-week period, there was an improvement in the perception of the presence and the intensity of the phantom limb pain, with a corresponding improvement in the duration of the pain and the affect on the person's lifestyle. The improvement was maintained when the clients self-treated. FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE: A follow-up questionnaire was carried out in 2007--12 months after the project had ended--to elicit whether the patients had suffered from phantom pain over the previous 12 months, whether they still had relief from phantom limb pain and whether they still self-treated.

CONCLUSIONS:

The project indicated that reflexology treatment, teaching and self-treatment were effective in eradicating or reducing the intensity and duration of phantom limb pain, in this group of clients. The follow-up questionnaire revealed that there was a maintained improvement in the intensity of phantom limb pain the patients experienced and that the majority still self-treated.

PMID: 18396256

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

9. Effects of massage on the mechanical behaviour of muscles in adolescents with spastic diplegia: a pilot study.

Macgregor R, Campbell R, Gladden MH, Tennant N, Young D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17355474

 

Source

Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

Abstract

Calf muscles of five adolescents aged 12 to 15 years (three males, two females) with spastic diplegia were massaged for 14 minutes twice a week for 5 weeks in a controlled sequence, stretching the muscles transversely rather than longitudinally, without eliciting pain. Slow, passive test stretches were applied before and after massage. After massage, the range of movement was not consistently increased but, on average, greater force was needed to stretch the muscle than before massage. However, after massage the resting ankle angle sometimes changed so that the calf muscles were either shorter or longer. We suggest that these phenomena could be explained if massage resets sarcomere lengths which corrects for thixotropic effects (i.e. previous use modifies a muscle's mechanical behaviour). A redistribution on sarcomere lengths within muscles could also have reset proprioceptive feedback. The incidence of abnormal stretch reflexes during test stretches fell from 40 to 22%, comparing the first five sessions with the last five sessions. The amplitude of voluntary alternating ankle rotation increased in three participants. Motor skills were assessed with the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 (GMFM-66) 1 week before the test period, during the 5th week, and 12 weeks later. Our participants in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) Levels I and II made sustained improvements in GMFM-66 scores (6.4% at 5 weeks falling to 5.5% at 17 weeks), one increase being significant. One participant in GMFCS Level III improved significantly only after massage of all leg muscles for 30 weeks.

PMID: 17355474

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. Effect of medicated bath plus acupoint massage on limbs in treating 42 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

[Article in Chinese]

Zhao MY, Chang H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17186738

 

Source

Jiaozuo Vocational College of Medicine, Henan. zhaomeiyu88@163.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To observe the effect of medicated bath plus acupoint massage on limbs (B-M treatment) in treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN).

METHODS:

Eighty-two patients were divided into two groups, the control group (n=40) and the treated group (n=42), they were treated by conventional treatment but with B-M treatment applied to the latter additionally, the course to both groups was 12 weeks. The curative effects obtained were compared after treatment.

RESULTS:

The total effective rate was higher in the treated group than that in the control group (81.0% vs. 52.5%, P < 0.05); the nerval transmission speed was improved significantly (P < 0.05) after treatment in both group, but that in the treated group was better than in the control group (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

B-M treatment on limbs has better effect than Western medicine along in promoting DPN restoration.

PMID: 17186738

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

11. The effect of abdominal massage on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury.

Ayaş S, Leblebici B, Sözay S, Bayramoğlu M, Niron EA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17117000

 

Source

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Başkent University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the effect of abdominal massage on clinical aspects of bowel dysfunction and colonic transit time in patients with spinal cord injury. Twenty-four patients were placed on a standard bowel program (phase I), after which abdominal massage was added to the regimen (phase II). Parameters of gastrointestinal system function and colonic transit times were evaluated.

DESIGN:

Uncontrolled clinical study.

RESULTS:

Eleven (45.8%) of the 24 patients had abdominal distention, and 10 (41.7%) had fecal incontinence in phase I; corresponding results for phase II were three (12.5%) and four (16.7%) (P = 0.008 and 0.031, respectively). There were no significant differences between the proportions of patients with difficult intestinal evacuation or abdominal pain or in mean time required for bowel evacuation in phase I vs. phase II. The mean frequencies of defecation in phases I and II were 3.79 +/- 2.15 (2.75-4.55) and 4.61 +/- 2.17 (3.67-5.54) bowel movements per week, respectively (P = 0.006). Mean total colonic transit time decreased from 90.60 +/- 32.67 (75.87-110.47) hrs in phase I to 72 +/- 34.10 (58.49-94.40) hrs in phase II (P = 0.035).

CONCLUSIONS:

Abdominal massage has positive effects on some clinical aspects of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

PMID: 17117000

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

12. Dynamics of neuromuscular system recovery as a consequence of various massage techniques as determined from electroneuromyography parameters.

[Article in Russian]

Solodkov AS, Povareshchenkova IuA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17100348

 

PMID:

17100348

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

13. My battle with spasmodic torticollis: a healing experience.

Garcia L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17099415

 

Source

College of Nursing, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, USA. laugarcia10@yahoo.com

Abstract

The life-transforming experience of overcoming spasmodic torticollis compelled the author to write the following personal account. The author, who triumphed over this debilitating disease, is now an advocate of holistic nursing practices that motivate patients through a genuine concern for patient well-being, community, and humanity. The author describes her personal experience of grief and the grieving process; the healing effects of crying; and her selection of the complementary and alternative therapies of prayer, music, and massage that became instrumental in finding a pathway to recovery. The story has appealing implications for strategies that utilize these concepts and techniques in clinical practice.

PMID: 17099415

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Abdominal massage as intervention for patients with paraplegia caused by spinal cord injury--a pilot study.

[Article in German]

Albers B, Cramer H, Fischer A, Meissner A, Schürenberg A, Bartholomeyczik S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16572678

 

Source

Institut für Plfegewissen-schaft, Universität Witten.

Abstract

Patients with paraplegia caused by spinal cord injuries have to deal with the loss of the central nervous regulation of the bowel functions. The management of defaecation can take a lot of their daily time. To support the colon motility, different methods of abdominal massage are used in nursing practice. But a review of current international literature reveals, that there is still a lack of evidence for the effect of abdominal massage on defaecation. In order to prove this effect, a pilot study was conducted using a quasi-experimental design with time series and including seven patients with paraplegia caused by spinal cord injury. Data were collected over three weeks: one week before intervention, during the intervention week and one week after intervention. In the intervention week, the patients received a specific abdominal massage each morning before breakfast. Following outcome-criteria have been considered: frequency and duration of defaecation, amount and consistency of faeces as well as subjective perception of the massage and its effects. Results: Some distinctive changes in the frequency and duration of defaecation could be registered over time. Most patients regarded the massage as a comfortable intervention that may have positive effects of the defaecation. Due to the pilot character of the study further research is necessary in order to validate these effects.

PMID: 16572678

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]