1. Fibromyalgia pain and substance P decrease and sleep improves after massage therapy.

Field T, Diego M, Cullen C, Hernandez-Reif M, Sunshine W, Douglas S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17041326

 

Source

Touch Research Institutes, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33101, USA. tfield@med.miami.edu

Abstract

Massage therapy has been observed to be helpful in some patients with fibromyalgia. This study was designed to examine the effects of massage therapy versus relaxation therapy on sleep, substance P, and pain in fibromyalgia patients. Twenty-four adult fibromyalgia patients were assigned randomly to a massage therapy or relaxation therapy group. They received 30-minute treatments twice weekly for 5 weeks. Both groups showed a decrease in anxiety and depressed mood immediately after the first and last therapy sessions. However, across the course of the study, only the massage therapy group reported an increase in the number of sleep hours and a decrease in their sleep movements. In addition, substance P levels decreased, and the patients' physicians assigned lower disease and pain ratings and rated fewer tender points in the massage therapy group.

PMID: 17041326

[PubMed]

 

2. Fibromyalgia pain and substance P decrease and sleep improves after massage therapy.

Field T, Diego M, Cullen C, Hernandez-Reif M, Sunshine W, Douglas S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17041326

 

Source

Touch Research Institutes, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33101, USA. tfield@med.miami.edu

Abstract

Massage therapy has been observed to be helpful in some patients with fibromyalgia. This study was designed to examine the effects of massage therapy versus relaxation therapy on sleep, substance P, and pain in fibromyalgia patients. Twenty-four adult fibromyalgia patients were assigned randomly to a massage therapy or relaxation therapy group. They received 30-minute treatments twice weekly for 5 weeks. Both groups showed a decrease in anxiety and depressed mood immediately after the first and last therapy sessions. However, across the course of the study, only the massage therapy group reported an increase in the number of sleep hours and a decrease in their sleep movements. In addition, substance P levels decreased, and the patients' physicians assigned lower disease and pain ratings and rated fewer tender points in the massage therapy group.

PMID: 17041326

[PubMed]

 

3. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms.

Rheumatol Int. 2010 Jul;30(9):1151-7. Epub 2010 Mar 20.

Kalichman L.

Source

Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. kleonid@bgu.ac.il

Abstract

Massage therapy is widely used by patients with fibromyalgia seeking symptom relief. We performed a review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials to determine whether massage therapy can be a viable treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. Extensive narrative review. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2009) were searched for the key words "massage", "massotherapy", "self-massage", "soft tissue manipulation", "soft tissue mobilization", "complementary medicine", "fibromyalgia" "fibrositis", and "myofascial pain". No language restrictions were imposed. The reference lists of all articles retrieved in full were also searched. The effects of massage on fibromyalgia symptoms have been examined in two single-arm studies and six randomized controlled trials. All reviewed studies showed short-term benefits of massage, and only one single-arm study demonstrated long-term benefits. All reviewed studies had methodological problems. The existing literature provides modest support for use of massage therapy in treating fibromyalgia. Additional rigorous research is needed in order to establish massage therapy as a safe and effective intervention for fibromyalgia. In massage therapy of fibromyalgia, we suggest that massage will be painless, its intensity should be increased gradually from session to session, in accordance with patient's symptoms; and the sessions should be performed at least 1-2 times a week.

PMID: 20306046

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

4. Comparison of manual lymph drainage therapy and connective tissue massage in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

Ekici G, Bakar Y, Akbayrak T, Yuksel I.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19243724

 

Source

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Ahi Evran University, Kirsehir, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study analyzed and compared the effects of manual lymph drainage therapy (MLDT) and connective tissue massage (CTM) in women with primary fibromyalgia (PFM).

METHODS:

The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Fifty women with PFM completed the study. The patients were divided randomly into 2 groups. Whereas 25 of them received MLDT, the other 25 underwent CTM. The treatment program was carried out 5 times a week for 3 weeks in each group. Pain was evaluated by a visual analogue scale and algometry. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Nottingham Health Profile were used to describe health status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyze the data.

RESULTS:

In both groups, significant improvements were found regarding pain intensity, pain pressure threshold, and HRQoL (P < .05). However, the scores of FIQ-7 (P = .006), FIQ-9 (P = .006), and FIQ-total (P = .010) were significantly lower in the MLDT group than they were in the CTM group at the end of treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

For this particular group of patients, both MLDT and CTM appear to yield improvements in terms of pain, health status, and HRQoL. The results indicate that these manual therapy techniques might be used in the treatment of PFM. However, MLDT was found to be more effective than CTM according to some subitems of FIQ (morning tiredness and anxiety) and FIQ total score. Manual lymph drainage therapy might be preferred; however, further long-term follow-up studies are needed.

PMID: 19243724

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Fibromyalgic syndrome: new perspectives in rehabilitation and management. A review.

[Article in Italian]

Melillo N, Corrado A, Quarta L, D'Onofrio F, Trotta A, Cantatore FP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16518304

 

Source

Clinica Reumatologica Mario Carrozzo, Università degli Studi di Foggia, Foggia.

Abstract

Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome, characterized by widespread body pain and pain at specific tender points, whose etiology and pathogenesis is still unknown. Patient can also exhibit a range of other symptoms including irritable bowel syndrome, chest pain, anxiety, fatigue, sleep disturbance, headache. The prevalence of fibromyalgia ranges from 1-3% in the general population, and the condition is more common among female than males. Contrary to the situation a few years ago, the most widely accepted hypothesis now evoke central nervous system mechanisms, whose local functions could influence also periferical microvascular activity at tender points. There are many findings supporting the hypothesis of different endogenic and exogenic factors that lead to chronic local hypoxia in muscle tissue. Currently, therapy is polipragmatic and is aimed at reducing the pain. A range of medical treatment had been used to treat fibromyalgia. Pharmacological therapy aims to enhance the pain threshold and to support sleep. Nonpharmaceutical treatment modalities, such as exercise, massage, idrotherapy can be helpful. Future studies should investigate the possible benefits of new strategies that may combine the effects of hot pool water, stretching exercises, massage and relaxation benefits of balneotherapy.

PMID: 16518304

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Use of a mechanical massage technique in the treatment of fibromyalgia: a preliminary study.

Gordon C, Emiliozzi C, Zartarian M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16401454

 

Source

Memorial Hospital of Union County, Marysville, OH 43043, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate how a mechanical massage technique (LPG technique) could contribute to the treatment of fibromyalgia.

DESIGN:

Feasibility study.

SETTING:

A single center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Ten women having a preexisting diagnosis of fibromyalgia based on American College of Rheumatology criteria were enrolled.

INTERVENTION:

Subjects received a total of 15 sessions of mechanical massage administered by a physical therapist once a week.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and a physical examination scoring tender points (number, pain intensity). Evaluations were conducted at the screening visit, after 7 sessions (V7), and after completion of 15 sessions (V15).

RESULTS:

Most of the parameters (pain intensity, physical function, number of tender points) showed a significant improvement at V15 compared with screening.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest the possibility that the studied intervention might be associated with positive outcomes in women with fibromyalgia, and support the need for a controlled clinical trial to determine its efficacy.

PMID: 16401454

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]