1. Effects of skin rehabilitation massage therapy on pruritus, skin status, and depression in burn survivors.

Roh YS, Cho H, Oh JO, Yoon CJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17435407

 

Source

Red Cross College of Nursing, Seoul, South Korea. aqua@redcross.ac.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Hypertrophic scarring and depression are the principal problems of burn rehabilitation. This study was done to verify the effects of skin rehabilitation massage therapy (SRMT) on pruritus, skin status, and depression for Korean burn survivors.

METHODS:

A pretest-posttest design using a nonequivalent control group was applied to examine the effects of SRMT for 3 months in a group of 18 burn survivors. The major dependent variables-including pruritus, objective and subjective scar status, and depression-were measured at the beginning and at the end of the therapy to examine the effects of SRMT.

RESULTS:

Burn survivors receiving SRMT showed reduced pruritus, improved skin status, and depression. The remaining scar also showed improvement in skin pigmentation, pliability, vascularity, and height (compared to the surrounding skin) as measured on the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS).

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings demonstrate that SRMT for burn survivors may improve their scars both objectively and subjectively, and also reduce pruritus and depression.

PMID:

17435407

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. The effectiveness of massage with and without dimethyl sulfoxide in preventing pressure ulcers: a randomized, double-blind cross-over trial in patients prone to pressure ulcers.

Duimel-Peeters IG, J G Halfens R, Ambergen AW, Houwing RH, P F Berger M, Snoeckx LH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17553503

 

Source

Department of Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiteit Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, the Netherlands. idu@bze7.azm.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although guidelines advise against massage, it is one of the methods widely regarded and used by nurses to prevent pressure ulcers (PU).

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of different variations of massage in preventing pressure ulcers.

METHODS:

A randomized, double-blind cross-over design, in which patients of nursing homes who are prone to PU underwent two of the three possible interventions; 'position changes only', 'massaging with an indifferent cream' and 'massaging with a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) cream'.

RESULTS:

The results of three interventions did not differ significantly. DMSO did not fulfil the expectations raised by literature and a previous pilot-study.

Comment in

PMID: 17553503

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Massage to prevent pressure ulcers: knowledge, beliefs and practice. A cross-sectional study among nurses in the Netherlands in 1991 and 2003.

Duimel-Peeters IG, Hulsenboom MA, Berger MP, Snoeckx LH, Halfens RJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16553756

 

Source

Department of Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiteit Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands. ig.duimel@igz.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pressure ulcers are a major problem in all areas of health care in the Netherlands. National guidelines for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were originally developed in 1985 and revised in 1991 and 2002. The value of these guidelines can be questioned because it seems they are not in line with the beliefs and practice of the caregivers and only 5% of them are evidence-based.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To get a better insight into nurses' current knowledge, beliefs and performed practices relating to massage, a study was designed to assess changes in these three aspects after the publication of the 2002 Dutch national guidelines. The outcome was compared with the situation in 1991, the year in which the previous guidelines were published.

DESIGN AND METHOD:

A cross-sectional comparative study was designed using written questionnaires. Questions were formulated regarding knowledge and beliefs about prevention methods and the actual use of these methods in the prevention of pressure ulcers. The 2003-survey population consisted of nurses working in the Netherlands and was approached at random via subscriptions to Nursing News (i.e. Verpleegkunde Nieuws), a Dutch professional journal or via affiliations to an institution participating in the 2003 National Prevalence Survey of Pressure Ulcers.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Compared with the 1991 findings, the 2003 results show an improvement for the topic of pressure ulcers, but a deterioration regarding dehydration. It is obvious that the knowledge of the current CBO-guidelines on massage is still not widely distributed as it should be. Our overall conclusion is that the differences in responses between 1991 and 2003 are significant and suggest that the nurses were better informed in 2003.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

For the improvement of health care in the domain of pressure ulcer preventions, we need more than an accurate implementation of new or existing guidelines. Guidelines should also be based on qualitative, methodological well-designed studies to be evidence-based.

PMID: 16553756

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Clinical observation on 136 cases of chilblains treated by acupuncture combined with massage.

[Article in Chinese]

Xiang F, Wang Y, Xiao YB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16312923

 

Source

Yongshun County Hospital of TCM, Hunan 416700, China. xiangfeng6631@sina.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare therapeutic effects of acupuncture plus massage and medicine on chilblains.

METHODS:

Two hundred and sixty-four cases of chilblains were randomly divided into an acupuncture group of 136 cases and a medicine group of 128 cases. The acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture at 9 acupoints such as Yamen (GV 15), Laogong (PC 8), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), etc. plus massage, and the medicine group by dong chuang Plaster.

RESULTS:

In the acupuncture group, 111 cases were cured and 136 cases were effective, the effective rate being 100.0%; and in the medicine group, 55 cases were cured and 98 cases were effective, the effective rate being 76.6%, with a very significant difference between the two groups in the therapeutic effect (P < 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

Acupuncture plus massage is superior to dong chuang plaster in therapeutic effect on chilblains.

PMID: 16312923

[PubMed - in process]

 

5. Massage therapy for skin conditions in young children.

Field T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16112449

 

Source

Touch Research Institutes, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33101, USA. tfield@med.miami.edu

Abstract

Two studies are reviewed that highlight the positive effects of massage therapy on skin conditions in young children. In the first study children being treated on a burn trauma unit received 30-minute massages before debridement or dressing change. The children who received massage therapy were more relaxed during the procedure. In the study on children with eczema, those who were massaged during the application of their skin medication showed less anxiety after the massage sessions. Across the massage period the children also showed an improved clinical condition including less redness, lichenification, scaling, excoriation, and pruritus.

PMID: 16112449

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6.The effects of massage as a method to prevent pressure ulcers. A review of the literature.

Duimel-Peeters IG, Halfens RJ, Berger MP, Snoeckx LH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16089061

 

Source

Department of Health Care Studies, Section Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiteit Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. i.duimel@zw.unimaas.nl

Abstract

General information about the effects of massage to prevent pressure ulcers is limited. A literature search was conducted to provide more detailed knowledge about the effects of massage in general and in preventing the development of pressure ulcers in particular. Using the keywords massage, rubbing, prevention of pressure ulcers/pressure ulcers, and paying particular attention to referenced articles yielded a summary of different manual massage techniques and indications/contraindications of this intervention for both healthy tissues and tissues in patients at risk for developing pressure ulcers. A careful review of this information; the clinical, physical, and pathophysiological aspects of pressure ulcers, including extrinsic and intrinsic factor; and the time-pressure relationship suggests that one type of massage may be beneficial for persons who are at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Specifically, effleurage applied with moderate pressure is the most preferred massage in the treatment of pressure ulcers, although based on currently existing studies, it cannot be proven statistically that massage is an adequate preventive method for pressure ulcers. Although many guidelines advised against use of massage in people at risk for pressure ulcers, current evidence suggests that research to increase knowledge about the mechanism behind the effects of massage as part of an individualized prevention and treatment plan should be conducted.

PMID: 16089061

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. Massage for preventing decubitus ulcer? 1: Guidelines are still not adequately integrated into general practice.

[Article in German]

Duimel-Peeters IG, Halfens RJ, Berger MP, Snoeckx LH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15945579

 

Source

Universiteit Maastricht, Faculty of Health Sciences, Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, The Netherlands.

PMID: 15945579

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]