1. Alternative therapies: what role do they have in the management of lupus?

Chou CT.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20947552

 

Source

Division of Allergy-Immunology-Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. ctchou@vghtpe.gov.tw

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with higher morbidity and mortality among ethnic Chinese patients than Whites. Corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive drugs, including cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and hydroxychloroquine are traditional therapies for this disease. Since the year 2000, mycophenolate mofetil and rituximab have been widely used in refractory SLE or severe lupus nephritis. Because the high disease activity remains, even after active therapy, and serious side effects from Western medicines may develop, more than 40% of SLE patients in Western countries are pursuing complementary and alternative therapies (CATs). CAT remedies are multiplex, and include herbal medicines, diets and vitamins, acupuncture, chiropractice, folk medicine, massage, spiritual healing, etc. Many herbal formulas have been used but in general their efficacy in treating lupus is doubted because of the lack of strong evidence. Tripterygium (T2) has demonstrated good efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and SLE, but widespread use is limited due to the side effects. Through randomized clinical trials, we hope in the future that some Chinese medicines may be found helpful as CATs for SLE.

PMID: 20947552

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Psychophysical and physical methods in treatment of dermatoses, accompanied by skin dryness and itching.

[Article in Russian]

Tsiskarishvili NV, Eradze MSh, Tsiskarishvili TsI.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20495223

 

Abstract

Traditionally, the exacerbation of skin diseases accompanied by itching and dryness is cutting off by using of antihistamines, indifferent ointment (sometimes together with topical corticosteroids) and antipruritic local means. For the continuous application in inter-relapsing period, patients, as a rule, are offered variety of lipid-recovery beauty creams, ointments and emulsions. At the same time, such measures do not have a significant impact on the severity of itching and the cost of these drugs is quite high. Based on the above, we propose an alternative method of treatment, including use of the variety of psychophysical method of therapy (dotted self-massage) and paravertebral UV - irradiation in combination with topical emollients for treatment of chronic dermatoses, involving dryness and itching of the skin. As the results of research in the study group of patients, compared with control group receiving traditional treatment, the main symptoms (dryness, a feeling of tightening the skin, itching) subsided considerably faster (on average 5 days), 85% patients of the study group pointed to the improvement of the general emotional state, reducing severity of depression, related to skin condition, which certainly indicates an improvement in their quality of life. After 3 weeks use of the drug "Secalia" a distinct reduction in severity of flaking skin has been revealed. By the end of the observation period (1.5 months) in patients of a main group no resumption of itching or worsening of the skin was revealed. A real advantage of this method is absolute security to the absence of contraindications (except for general contraindications for physiotherapy procedures) and unwanted side effects, excellent tolerability, simplicity and ease of use. Unlike other methods of physiotherapy the complex of psycho-physical exercises can be used in the home. Availability, simplicity, and possibility of using at home, absolute safety, effectiveness against dryness and itching relief of the proposed method, allow to recommend it as a basic tool for continuous use in patients with dermatoses, which are accompanied by dryness and itching, both in combination with other basic drugs, and as a monotherapy.

PMID: 20495223

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Observation on short and long-term effects of Tuina for treatment of infants eczema].

[Article in Chinese]

He YH, Kang J, Liu GZ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19947273

 

Source

Department of TCM, The People's Hospital of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan, China. hh.567@163.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To access the therapeutic effect of Tuina for treatment of infants eczema.

METHODS:

Two hundred and forty children with eczema were randomly divided into a Tuina group and a medication group, 120 cases in each group. The Tuina group was treated with Tuina on ten points using the thumb and middle finger, and the medication group was treated with oral administration of Chlorpheniramine and topical application of zinc oxide ointment or Youzhuoer ointment, etc. The therapeutic effects were evaluated after 3 weeks.

RESULTS:

The cured-markedly effective rate and total effective rate were 94.2% and 99.2% in the Tuina group and 98.0% and 100.0% in the medication group, respectively, the therapeutic effects were similar in the two groups (both P>0.05); 6 months after treatment, the recurrence rate of 3.8% in the Tuina group was significantly lower than 42.9% in the medication group (P<0.01), and there were no adverse reactions in the whole research process.

CONCLUSION:

Tuina on ten points for treatment of infants eczema has unequivocal short-term effect, a stable long-term effect, and low recurrence rate.

PMID: 19947273

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Efficacy of a grapefruit extract on head lice: a clinical trial.

Abdel-Ghaffar F, Semmler M, Al-Rasheid K, Klimpel S, Mehlhorn H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19943066

 

Source

Department of Zoology and Parasitology, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.

Abstract

Twenty children aging 2-9 years old--four boys with short hair and 16 girls with long hair--were included in a clinical test on the efficacy of a product against head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis). Their hair were exposed to Licatack, which is a recently developed new anti-louse medicinal product containing extracts of grapefruits besides high quality shampoo components. Prior to this field trial, the product Licatack was tested dermatologically to be skin safe receiving the grade "very good". The children's mothers combed the kids prior to the start of the test in order to confirm that they were all lice-infested. The obtained lice were used for in vitro tests. All children were heavily infested. After combing and preservation of the living lice, the hair was wet with tap water. Then, 50 ml of the Licatack shampoo was placed onto the top of each child's head. Then, the mothers distributed the rather fluid product all over the hair thoroughly from their base at the skin until the free end. During this process, a type of massage, the product became foamy and it was easily recognized where the product covered the hair, thus, avoiding untreated spots. The hair of half of the treated children were washed with tap water after 10 min of exposition; while in the other half of the children, the exposition period was prolonged to 20 min before washing. When combing the kids with a metal louse comb after the washing, the lice were found immobile and they did not recover during the following observation period of 4 h. Only two lice from the group with an exposition time of only 10 min showed some slight leg movements after they had been combed off, but they died within the next 2 h. Thus, this new anti-louse medicinal product has a very quick and efficient activity besides its advantages of being non-inflammable, skin safe, and nice smelling. None of the kids claimed any burning at the skin or other side effects, although the skin showed, prior to treatment, lots of scars due to louse bites. The dead lice always appeared considerably shrunken due to drying. The second treatment after 10 days revealed a few dead larval stages since, apparently, some larvae (apparently treated at an early stage of development when treated) had hatched from the extremely numerous nits in the period between first and second treatment. Experiments with cutoff nits, however, showed that the product also kills larval stages inside nits.

PMID: 19943066

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Clinical inquiries. Do nonmedicated topicals relieve childhood eczema?

Yates JE, Phifer JB, Flake D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19442393

 

Source

Coastal Area Health Education Center, Family Medicine Residency, Wilmington, NC, USA.

Abstract

Emollients are effective first-line treatment to decrease symptoms of eczema and reduce the need to use steroids in children. Tar preparations work, but compliance may be limited. Gamma-linoleic acid preparations, borage oil, and evening primrose oil show efficacy in small studies. MAS063DP cream (Atopiclair) is effective. Chamomile and bathing in acidic hot spring water may be effective, but these treatments have not been adequately evaluated. Wet wrap dressings may be effective but increase the risk of skin infections. Hamamelis distillate creams and massage with essential oils/aromatherapy are ineffective.

PMID: 19442393

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service: a survey.

Lin YC, Lee AC, Kemper KJ, Berde CB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16336482

 

Source

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. yuan-chi@tch.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities.

DESIGN:

A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs.

RESULTS:

Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey. Thirty-eight institutions (86%) offered one or more complementary and alternative medical therapies for their patients. Those therapies included biofeedback (65%), guided imagery (49%), relaxation therapy (33%), massage (35%), hypnosis (44%), acupuncture (33%), art therapy (21%), and meditation (21%).

CONCLUSIONS:

This report documents trends in complementary and alternative medical therapies usage in the tertiary pediatric pain management service. There is a high prevalence in the integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies in pediatric pain management programs. Additional clinical research in the safety and efficacy in complementary and alternative medical therapies for pediatric pain management is urgently needed.

PMID: 16336482

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]