1. Health in China. Traditional Chinese medicine: one country, two systems.

Hesketh T, Zhu WX.

Source

Centre for International Child Health, London.

Abstract

China is the only country in the world where Western medicine and traditional medicine are practised alongside each other at every level of the healthcare system. Traditional Chinese medicine has a unique theoretical and practical approach to the treatment of disease, which has developed over thousands of years. Traditional treatments include herbal remedies, acupuncture, acupressure and massage, and moxibustion. They account for around 40% of all health care delivered in China. The current government policy of expansion of traditional facilities and manpower is being questioned because many hospitals using traditional Chinese medicine are already underutilized and depend on government subsidies for survival. Research priorities include randomised controlled trials of common treatments and analysis of the active agents in herbal remedies. As more studies show the clinical effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine, an integrated approach to disease using a combination of Western medicine and traditional approaches becomes a possibility for the future.

Comment in

PMID: 9240055

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2127090

 

2. The cultural and philosophical aspects of pressure, massage, and touch healing as alternative therapies.

Oumeish OY.

Source

Jordan Laser Center, PO Box 65, Prince Rashid Suburb, Amman 11831, Jordan. oumeishdermatol@hotmail.com

Abstract

Integrative medicine is becoming more popular, not only in developing nations, but also in countries such as the United States. Acupuncture, which is practiced more than any other kind of alternative medicine, is based on the philosophy and culture of old Chinese healing. Pressure, massage, and touch healing depend on stimulation by the fingers rather than needles, although they are based on acupuncture principles. Touch has social, educational, cultural, and humanitarian aspects. Touch therapy has been shown to have excellent effects on children's growth, development, and emotional well-being. In adults, a 15-minute rubdown by fingertips can lead to relaxation and sleep. It is also useful for premature babies. Such therapies were practiced in the Old World, but have been rediscovered in the New World. They represent some aspects of the old, noble art of healing.

PMID: 15788892

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. The BBC survey of complementary medicine use in the UK.

Ernst E, White A.

Source

Department of Complementary Medicine, School of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Recent data about the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by the general population exist for Australia and the USA, but not for the UK. This study aimed at providing such data.

DESIGN:

Nationally representative random telephone survey.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

1204 British adults were interviewed.

RESULTS:

20% of the sample used CAM in the previous year. Herbalism, aromatherapy, homoeopathy, acupuncture/acupressure, massage and reflexology were the most popular treatment modalities. The main reasons for trying CAM were its perceived effectiveness, a positive inclination towards it, and its relaxing effects. On average, users spent 13.62 +/- 1.61 Pounds on CAM per month, which extrapolates to an annual expenditure of 1.6 billion Pounds for the whole nation.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is concluded that CAM is prevalent in the UK. Therefore, its scientific validation has become an ethical imperative.

PMID: 10812758

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Towards a model for integrative medicine in Swedish primary care.

Sundberg T, Halpin J, Warenmark A, Falkenberg T.

Source

Unit for Studies of Integrative Health Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet 23300, Huddinge, Sweden. tobias.sundberg@ki.se <tobias.sundberg@ki.se>

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Collaboration between providers of conventional care and complementary therapies (CTs) has gained in popularity but there is a lack of conceptualised models for delivering such care, i.e. integrative medicine (IM). The aim of this paper is to describe some key findings relevant to the development and implementation of a proposed model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care.

METHODS:

Investigative procedures involved research group and key informant meetings with multiple stakeholders including general practitioners, CT providers, medical specialists, primary care administrators and county council representatives. Data collection included meeting notes which were fed back within the research group and used as ongoing working documents. Data analysis was made by immersion/crystallisation and research group consensus. Results were categorised within a public health systems framework of structures, processes and outcomes.

RESULTS:

The outcome was an IM model that aimed for a patient-centered, interdisciplinary, non-hierarchical mix of conventional and complementary medical solutions to individual case management of patients with pain in the lower back and/or neck. The IM model case management adhered to standard clinical practice including active partnership between a gate-keeping general practitioner, collaborating with a team of CT providers in a consensus case conference model of care. CTs with an emerging evidence base included Swedish massage therapy, manual therapy/naprapathy, shiatsu, acupuncture and qigong.

CONCLUSION:

Despite identified barriers such as no formal recognition of CT professions in Sweden, it was possible to develop a model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. The IM model calls for testing and refinement in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to explore its clinical effectiveness.

PMID: 17623105

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC1950868

Free PMC Article

 

5. Popularity of complementary and alternative medicine in Japan: a telephone survey.

Yamashita H, Tsukayama H, Sugishita C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12481956

 

Source

Tsukuba College of Technology Clinic, Tsukuba, Japan. yamashita@k.tsukuba-tech.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To obtain information on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Japan.

DESIGN:

Nationwide, random-sampled and population-weighted telephone survey.

METHODS:

The survey was conducted by a telephone survey company in April 2001. The sample size of respondents was 1000. Using a region-, gender- and age-weighted sampling table, professional operators called respondents with random-digit dialling. Respondents were asked questions about their use of CAM in the past 12 months, out-of-pocket expenditures on CAM and orthodox Western medicine, reasons for the use of CAM and so on, as well as general socio-demographics.

RESULTS:

The percentage of respondents who had used at least one CAM therapy in the past 12 months was greater than those who had used orthodox Western medicine (76.0% (95% CI: 73.4-78.6) vs 65.6% (95% CI: 62.7-68.5). The percentage of use for each CAM therapy was as follows: nutritional and tonic drinks (43.1%), dietary supplements (43.1%), health-related appliances (21.5%), herbs or over-the-counter Kampo (17.2%), massage or acupressure (14.8%), ethical Kampo (Kampo prescribed by medical doctors) (10.0%), aromatherapy (9.3%), chiropractic or osteopathy (7.1%), acupuncture and moxibustion (6.7%), homeopathy (0.3%), and other therapies (6.5%). Regarding the reasons for the use of CAM, 60.4% responded that 'the condition was not serious enough to warrant orthodox Western medicine', and 49.3% were 'expecting health promotion or disease prevention'. Average annual out-of-pocket expenditures of all the 1000 respondents for CAM were half as much as those for orthodox Western medicine (19,080 yen (95% CI: 15,824-22,336) vs 38,360 yen (95% CI: 30,439-46,280)).

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM is very popular in Japan and the expenditures for them are not negligible, although there is still an overwhelming dominance of orthodox Western medicine with regard to cost, variety of indications, and severity of conditions.

PMID: 12481956

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among women in New York City: a pilot study.

Factor-Litvak P, Cushman LF, Kronenberg F, Wade C, Kalmuss D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11822614

 

Source

The Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study documents the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), among White, African American, and Hispanic/Latina women living in New York City. A pilot to a national survey of CAM use among American women, this study explores women's use of categories of CAM and various CAM practitioners, racial and ethnic differences in CAM use, and women's perceptions regarding the effectiveness of CAM. DESIGN AND LOCATION: Data were collected from women residing in New York City using random digit dialing/computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). The sample of 300 had equal numbers of women (n = 100) who self-identified as White, Hispanic/Latina, and African American, equally stratified by age (below and above age 40).

SUBJECTS:

Eligibility requirements included self-identification as Anglo/white, African American, or Hispanic/Latina and between ages 18 and 80.

MEASURES:

Three distinct categories of CAM were explored: (1) medicinal teas, homeopathic remedies, herbs, vitamins; (2) yoga, meditation, spiritual practices; and (3) manual therapies including chiropractic, massage, acupressure. Health concerns of interest were those frequently described in prior focus groups, and included reproductive health issues (e.g., pregnancy, menstruation, menopause) as well as other common women's health problems (e.g., heart disease, high blood pressure, headaches).

RESULTS:

More than half the sample has used a CAM treatment or remedy, and 40% have visited a CAM practitioner. Among users, half have used only one of the CAM categories, approximately one third have used two, and 16% used all three. The category of CAM used most often was medicinal tea/herbs/vitamins; the practitioners visited most frequently were chiropractors (18%) and nutritionists (17%). Racial and ethnic differences in CAM use were minimal, and approximately one third of all treatments used were rated "very effective" by users.

CONCLUSIONS:

Substantial utilization of CAM remedies and treatments for a variety of women's health concerns is observed. Further inquiry with larger samples of women is recommended.

PMID: 11822614

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. Complementary and alternative medicine for pain: an evidence-based review.

Dhanani NM, Caruso TJ, Carinci AJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21063917

 

Source

Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 15 Parkman Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

Pain is one of the most prevalent conditions for which patients seek medical attention. Additionally, the number of patients who utilize complementary and alternative medicine as a treatment of pain either in lieu of, or concurrent with, standard conventional treatments continues to grow. While research into the mechanisms, side effect profiles, and efficacies of these alternative therapies has increased in recent years, much more remains unknown and untested. Herein, we review the literature on complementary and alternative medicine for pain, with particular emphasis on evidence-based assessments pertinent to the most common alternative therapies, including acupuncture, herbal therapy, massage therapy, hypnosis, tai chi, and biofeedback.

PMID: 21063917

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Complementary therapy and support services for formal and informal caregivers in Italian palliative care hospices: an exploratory and descriptive study.

Belletti M, Mallia L, Lucidi F, Reichmann S, Mastroianni C, De Marinis MG, Casale G.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21058049

 

Source

Antea Formad, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The present study is aimed to assess the availability and use of complementary medicine (CM) therapies in Italian palliative care hospices, and the support services available to caregivers and hospice staff.

METHODS:

A national sample of 30 hospices meeting study criteria provided data by means of telephone interviews.

RESULTS:

All hospices offered spiritual assistance and at least one other form of CM, with the most common being massage therapy (n = 24) and relaxation therapy (n = 10). When offered complementary therapies, 65% or more of the patients accepted them. Twenty-nine hospices provided spiritual and psychological support to caregivers during patient stays, but only 12 offered support at home. All hospices offered support services to their staff, both in individual and group formats.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite limited empirical support, CM has become an important part of palliative care for end-of-life patients in Italy, as in many other countries.

PMID: 21058049

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

9. An investigation into the use of complementary and alternative medicine in an urban general practice.

Mc Kenna F, Killoury F.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20845599

 

Source

Rath Mhuire Health Centre, 9 Malahide Rd, Swords, Co Dublin. drfionamckenna@yahoo.ie

Abstract

Several International studies have shown the substantial growth in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, no study in the Republic of Ireland to date has looked at its use among the population. A cross-sectional survey of 328 patients attending an urban general practice was conducted. A high number of respondents reported having visited a CAM practitioner within the past 12 months (89 patients; 27%). A significant positive association was found between CAM use and female gender (p = 0.006), middle-aged (p = 0.013), private health insurance (p = 0.016) and full time employment (p = 0.031). Massage was the most common modality used (35 patients; 39.8%), the most common reason for use was 'to treat an illness for which conventional medicine was already sought' (31 patients; 42%), a high rate of non-disclosure to GPs was found (34 patients; 41%) and personal recommendation was the most important source of information (42 patients; 53.2%). This study demonstrates the current popularity of an alternative healthcare system.

PMID: 20845599

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. Complementary and alternative medicine use in England: results from a national survey.

Hunt KJ, Coelho HF, Wider B, Perry R, Hung SK, Terry R, Ernst E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20698902

 

Source

Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK. Katherine.hunt@pms.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

In many countries, recent data on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are available. However, in England, there is a paucity of such data. We sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of CAM use in England.

DESIGN:

Data were obtained from the Health Survey for England 2005, a national household survey that included questions on CAM use. We used binary logistic regression modelling to explore whether demographic, health and lifestyle factors predict CAM use.

RESULTS:

Data were available for 7630 respondents (household response rate 71%). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of CAM use were 44.0% and 26.3% respectively; 12.1% had consulted a practitioner in the preceding 12 months. Massage, aromatherapy and acupuncture were the most commonly used therapies. Twenty-nine percent of respondents taking prescription drugs had used CAM in the last 12 months. Women (OR 0.491, 95% CI: 0.419, 0.577), university educated respondents (OR 1.296, 95% CI: 1.088, 1.544), those suffering from anxiety or depression (OR 1.341, 95% CI: 1.074, 1.674), people with poorer mental health (on GHQ: OR 1.062, 95% CI 1.026, 1.100) and lower levels of perceived social support (1.047, 95% CI: 1.008, 1.088), people consuming ≥ 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day (OR 1.327, 95% CI: 1.124, 1.567) were significantly more likely to use CAM.

CONCLUSION:

Complementary and alternative medicine use in England remains substantial, even amongst those taking prescription drugs. These data serve as a valuable reminder to medical practitioners to ask patients about CAM use and should be routinely collected to facilitate prioritisation of the research agenda in CAM.

© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

PMID: 20698902

[PubMed - in process]

 

11. Complementary and alternative medicine use in a pediatric neurology clinic.

Aburahma SK, Khader YS, Alzoubi K, Sawalha N.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20621269

 

Source

Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, PO Box 3030, Irbid, Jordan. samahk72@yahoo.com

Abstract

To evaluate the frequency and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children attending a pediatric neurology clinic in North Jordan, a parent completed questionnaire survey of children attending the pediatric neurology clinic at King Abdullah University Hospital from March to July 2008 was conducted. A review of 176 completed questionnaires showed that 99 parents (56%) had used CAM for their child's specific neurological illness. The most common modalities were prayer/reciting the Quran (77%), religious healers (30%), massage with olive oil (32%), and consumption of honey products (29%). The most common reason was religious beliefs in 68%. None reported lack of trust in conventional medicine as the reason behind seeking CAM. Factors significantly associated with CAM use were speech delay, belief in its usefulness, father's age more than 30 years, and mothers with education less than high school. CAM had a supplementary role in relation to traditional western medicine use.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20621269

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

12. An overview of 45 published database resources for complementary and alternative medicine.

Boehm K, Raak C, Vollmar HC, Ostermann T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20565550

 

Source

Center of Integrative Medicine, University of Witten/Herdecke, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany. drkatjaboehm@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has succeeded to implement itself in the academic context of universities. In order to get information on CAM, clinicians, researchers and healthcare professionals as well as the lay public are increasingly turning to online portals and databases, which disseminate relevant resources. One specific type of online information retrieval systems, namely the database, is being reviewed in this article.

QUESTION:

This overview aims at systematically retrieving and describing all databases covering the field of CAM. One of the requirements for inclusion was that the database would also have to be published in a medical journal.

DATA SOURCES:

The databases AMED, CAMbase, EMBASE, and MEDLINE/PubMed were searched between December 2008 and December 2009 for publications relevant to CAM databases. The authors' specialist library was also searched for grey literature to be included.

STUDY SELECTION:

All included databases were then visited online and information on the context, structure and volume of the database was extracted.

MAIN RESULTS:

Forty-five databases were included in this overview. Databases covered herbal therapies (n = 11), traditional Chinese medicine (n = 9) and some dealt with a vast number of CAM modalities (n = 9), amongst others. The amount of time the databases had been in existence ranged from 4 to 53 years. Countries of origin included the USA (n = 14), UK (n = 7) and Germany (n = 6), amongst others. The main language in 42 of 45 databases was English.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although this overview is quite comprehensive with respect to the field of CAM, certain CAM practices such as chiropractic, massage, reflexology, meditation or yoga may not have been covered adequately. A more detailed assessment of the quality of the included databases might give additional insights into the listed resources. The creation of a personalised meta-search engine is suggested, towards which this overview could be seen as a first step.

PMID: 20565550

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

13. Use of and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine among nurse-midwives in Israel.

Samuels N, Zisk-Rony RY, Singer SR, Dulitzky M, Mankuta D, Shuval JT, Oberbaum M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20541732

 

Source

The Center for Integrative Complementary Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. refplus@netvision.net.il

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the study was to evaluate the use and attitudes of nurse-midwives in Israel toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

STUDY DESIGN:

In a cross-sectional study, nurse-midwives from 5 Israeli medical centers completed the CAM Health Belief Questionnaire, a validated tool examining data regarding personal health behavior, use of CAM therapies, and attitudes toward CAM.

RESULTS:

One hundred seventy-three of 238 potential respondents completed the questionnaires (72.7%). Most (87.3%) reported using CAM (67.1% massage, 48.6% herbal medicine, 42.2% meditation, 40.5% touch therapies, and 39.9% prayer) and agree with many fundamental tenets of CAM such as the existence of energy forces, self-healing, and integrating patients' health beliefs and values into their care.

CONCLUSION:

The majority of nurse-midwives studied reported using and recommending CAM to their patients and believe that CAM can complement conventional medical therapies. Health care providers could benefit from education with regard to the efficacy and safety of CAM modalities during pregnancy and childbirth.

Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20541732

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

14. The organization of curative and preventive care to patients on the basis of a day hospital].

[Article in Russian]

Efankina ON.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20499694

 

Abstract

The paper provides the results of the examination and treatment of 1500 patients with cerebro-vascular pathology on the basis of an urban polyclinic. The use of the complex therapy (medicaments, physiotherapy, massage, acupuncture, therapeutic physical training) under conditions of the day hospital allows achieving the proper clinical effect.

PMID: 20499694

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

15. An analysis of nursing and medical students' attitudes towards and knowledge of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Yildirim Y, Parlar S, Eyigor S, Sertoz OO, Eyigor C, Fadiloglu C, Uyar M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20492061

 

 

Source

Department of Internal Medicine Nursing, Ege University Nursing School, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey. yasemin.kyildirim@ege.edu.tr

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

This study aims to evaluate and compare nursing and medical students' attitudes and knowledge about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

BACKGROUND:

Despite increased popularity of the use of complementary and alternative medicine, it is not included in nursing and medicine schools' curricula in many countries.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional design was used.

METHOD:

This study's research population included 972 students who were educated at a school of nursing and a faculty of medicine during the academic year 2006-2007. The study used a questionnaire the researchers prepared as data collection form. Pearson chi-square test was used to observe the differences between nursing and medical students. A p-value <0.05 was accepted statistically significant.

RESULTS:

The population was 49.1% nursing students and 50.9% medical students. Of the nursing students, 57.8% agreed with the statements that complementary and alternative medicine modalities should be integrated into clinical practice, 61.3% agreed for curriculum. Of the medical school students, 32.6% agreed for clinical practice and 37.9% for curriculum. The nursing students had sufficient knowledge of mostly massage and imagery; and medical students had sufficient knowledge of mostly diet therapy, vitamins and prayer.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of current study reveal that nursing students adopt more positive attitudes than medical students towards complementary and alternative medicine therapies and that both student groups have limited knowledge of complementary and alternative medicine modalities.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Physicians and nurses play important roles in helping patients use complementary and alternative medicine safely and accurately. Therefore, as future nurses and physicians, nursing and medical students should have sufficient knowledge of and education on complementary and alternative medicine modalities. In this context, handling complementary and alternative medicine on a scientific scale and including it in nursing and medical students' educational programmes should be among the goals and plans in Turkey.

PMID: 20492061

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

16. Knowledge, attitudes, and use of complementary and alternative therapies among clinical nurse specialists in an academic medical center.

Cutshall S, Derscheid D, Miers AG, Ruegg S, Schroeder BJ, Tucker S, Wentworth L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20404620

 

Source

Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. Cutshall.susane@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There has been an increase in the use and awareness of complementary and integrative therapies in the United States over the last 10 years. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are in an ideal place to influence this paradigm shift in medicine to provide holistic care.

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by CNSs in a large Midwest medical center.

DESIGN:

This study used a descriptive exploratory correlational design.

SAMPLE/SETTING:

Seventy-six CNSs who work in various inpatient and outpatient units within this medical facility were surveyed electronically, in the fall of 2008, using a 26-item questionnaire developed by the research team.

METHOD:

Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

FINDINGS:

The results demonstrate that CNSs at this academic medical center use several CAM therapies for their personal use and for professional practice with patients. The top therapies that CNSs personally used were humor, massage, spirituality/prayer, music therapy, and relaxed breathing. The top therapies requested most by patients were massage, spirituality/prayer, healing touch, acupuncture, and music therapy. The results indicated that most CNSs thought CAM therapies were beneficial and that there was some evidence for use of these therapies for use by patients or by CNSs.

IMPLICATIONS:

The results of this study will help to determine educational needs and clinical practice of CAM therapies with CNSs at this academic medical center. The survey used and the research results from this study can be a template for other CNSs to use to begin to address this topic of CAM use in other hospitals and clinical settings. This survey could be used to explore CAM use by patients in specialty areas for practice enhancement.

PMID: 20404620

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17. A preliminary survey of the practice patterns of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM.

Buchanan PA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359346

 

Source

Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, Des Moines University, 3200 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa, USA. pat.buchanan@dmu.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Feldenkrais Method(R) of somatic education purports to guide people of varying ages and abilities to improve function. Many people choose this method to aid with recovery from injury, manage chronic conditions, or enhance performance even though limited research supporting its safety and effectiveness exists to guide decisions about use and referral. Very little information about practitioner characteristics and practice patterns is publicly available to assist researchers in the design of appropriate safety and effectiveness studies. The purpose of this study was to obtain an initial overview of the characteristics of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM.

METHODS:

Of 1300 certified Feldenkrais practitioners at the time of the study, there were 1193 practitioners with email accounts who were sent invitations to complete a web-based survey. The survey inquired about practice locations, additional credentials, service patterns and workloads during the previous 3 months. Response rate and descriptive statistics were calculated.

RESULTS:

The survey had a 32.3% (385/1193) response rate. The top states in which responders practiced were California (n = 92) and New York (n = 44). Most responders did not hold other credentials as traditional health care providers or as complementary and alternative medicine providers. Among those who did, the most common credentials were physical therapist (n = 83) and massage therapist (n = 38). Just over a third of traditional health care providers only provided Feldenkrais lessons, compared to 59.3% of complementary and alternative providers. On average, responders saw 7.6 +/- 8.1 (median = 5) clients per week for individual lessons, 8.4 +/- 11.5 (median = 5) clients per week for group lessons, and 2.9 +/- 3.9 (median = 2) new clients per month for individual lessons.

CONCLUSIONS:

This preliminary survey of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioners indicated that most practiced in the west and northeast, did not hold additional credentials, and had part-time practices. Those who were traditional health care providers were more likely than complementary and alternative medicine providers in other areas to combine their services. These results provide a foundation for further analyses of Feldenkrais practitioner characteristics and practice patterns that can aid the design of safety and effectiveness studies, and enhance use and referral decision-making.

PMID: 20359346

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

18. Factors that influence practitioners' interpretations of evidence from alternative medicine trials: a factorial vignette experiment embedded in a national survey.

Tilburt JC, Miller FG, Jenkins S, Kaptchuk TJ, Clarridge B, Bolcic-Jankovic D, Emanuel EJ, Curlin FA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20355265

 

Source

Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. tilburt.jon@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Clinical trial evidence in controversial areas such as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) must be approached with an open mind.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine what factors may influence practitioners' interpretation of evidence from CAM trials. Research

DESIGN:

In a mailed survey of 2400 US CAM and conventional medicine practitioners we included 2 hypothetical factorial vignettes of positive and negative research results for CAM clinical trials. Vignettes contained randomly varied journal (Annals of Internal Medicine vs. Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medicine) and CAM treatment type (acupuncture, massage, glucosamine, meditation, and reiki). Response items also included randomly varied patient circumstances-chronic refractory symptoms and the patient requesting CAM.

MEASURES:

All practitioners rated the effectiveness and their willingness to recommend the therapy for a described patient. We used logistic regression to determine the independent influence of the 4 factors on respondents' effectiveness and legitimacy judgments.

RESULTS:

A total of 1561 practitioners responded (65%). Relative to Reiki, conventional medicine practitioners were most willing to recommend glucosamine (OR = 3.0; 95% CI [1.6-5.4]), than massage (1.9 [1.1-3.3]), acupuncture (1.3 [0.8-2.2]), and meditation (1.2 [0.7-2.0]). CAM practitioners rated acupuncture as effective more than other CAM therapies (OR = 5.8 [2.6-12.8] compared with Reiki), and were more willing to recommend acupuncture (OR = 12.3 [4.8-31.8]). When presented evidence of inefficacy, CAM practitioners were most willing to recommend acupuncture relative to other CAM therapies (OR = 15.5 [9.0-26.9]).

CONCLUSIONS:

Practitioners' judgments about CAM trial evidence depend on the type of treatments reported. Confirmation bias may play a role in the clinical translation of new evidence from clinical trials.

PMID: 20355265

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. Randomized controlled trial on effect of Tuina for treatment of sub-health people of somatic pain].

[Article in Chinese]

Pang J, Tang HL, Gao LF, Wang KL, Lei LM, Liu ZW, Gan W, Lu Y, Zhou HF, Li JS, Zhang QM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20353117

 

Source

Acupuncture and Massage School, Guangxi College of TCM, Nanning 530001, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the clinical effect and safety of Tuina for treatment of somatic pain of sub-health.

METHODS:

A randomized, double-blind and blank parallel controlled trial was done. The experiment group was treated with Tuina and the control group lied down for rest, 45 minutes each time, twice each week for three weeks.

RESULTS:

Tuina treatment could improve more on sensory, affective, evaluation, pain rating index and extant pain intensity of the pain index, and score of subjective sensation of life quality and health status together with physiology and psychology field of life quality.

CONCLUSION:

Massage is an effective therapy for treatment of somatic pain of sub-health without adverse reactions and it should be generalized to application.

PMID: 20353117

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

20. Stimulating effect of aromatherapy massage with jasmine oil.

Hongratanaworakit T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20184043

 

 

Source

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Srinakharinwirot University, Rangsit-Ongkharak Road, Nakhonnayok 26120, Thailand. tapanee@swu.ac.th

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage with jasmine oil (Jasminum sambac L., Oleaceae) on humans. Human autonomic parameters, i.e. blood pressure, pulse rate, blood oxygen saturation, breathing rate, and skin temperature, were recorded as indicators of the arousal level of the autonomic nervous system. In addition, subjects had to rate their emotional condition in terms of relaxation, vigor, calmness, attentiveness, mood, and alertness in order to assess subjective behavioral arousal. Forty healthy volunteers participated in the experiments. Jasmine oil was applied topically to the skin of the abdomen of each subject. Compared with placebo, jasmine oil caused significant increases of breathing rate, blood oxygen saturation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which indicated an increase of autonomic arousal. At the emotional level, subjects in the jasmine oil group rated themselves as more alert, more vigorous and less relaxed than subjects in the control group. This finding suggests an increase of subjective behavioral arousal. In conclusion, our results demonstrated the stimulating/activating effect of jasmine oil and provide evidence for its use in aromatherapy for the relief of depression and uplifting mood in humans.

PMID: 20184043

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

21. Association of spa therapy with improvement of psychological symptoms of occupational burnout: a pilot study.

Blasche G, Leibetseder V, Marktl W.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20616516

 

Source

Department of Environmental Hygiene, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Bad Tatzmannsdorf, Austria. gerhard.blasche@meduniwien.ac.at

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of a 3-week resort-based spa therapy (a combination of balneotherapy, massages, exercise etc., including a respite from work) on psychological symptoms associated with occupational burnout.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In a longitudinal design, a group of 65 actively working individuals (45 women, 20 men, mean age 50.4 +/- 6.7 years) of various occupations selected on the basis of their level of burnout and undergoing spa therapy primarily for musculoskeletal pain were studied in regard to the change in fatigue, distress, reduced motivation, and quality of sleep. Variables were assessed at the beginning and at the end of spa therapy as well as 4 weeks and 3 months after treatment. Two levels of burnout were distinguished: individuals with mild burnout (i.e. increased emotional exhaustion) and individuals with a full burnout syndrome (i.e. increased exhaustion plus social detachment and/or performance dissatisfaction).

RESULTS:

At the end of the treatment, all four symptoms of burnout showed a significant improvement in both groups compared to their pre-treatment level. This improvement was sustained up to 3 months post-treatment for both burnout groups.

CONCLUSION:

Spa therapy may be a helpful measure for treating the symptoms of occupational burnout.

2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 20616516

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

22. Impression on observing psychic surgery and healing in Brazil which appear to incorporate (+) qi gong energy & the use of acupuncture points.

Omura Y.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9188913

 

Source

Heart Disease Research Foundation, New York, USA.

Abstract

In December, 1995, the author had the opportunity to observe an elderly psychic healer of East European origin in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This man specialized in cancer treatment by pointing with the fingers of his right hand at his patients, without actually touching them, spending an average of 30 to 40 minutes with each one. The author considered this to be Qi Gong treatment. In March, 1997 the author also observed 2 leading psychic healers in Brazil. One of them, named Rubens Farias, Jr. is a 43 year-old former engineer and computer programmer if European descent, who is commonly known as "Dr. Fritz III" because he is believed to be the spirit of Dr. Adolf Fritz, a German physician who died during World War I, operates through him. The other is "Dr." Hirota, a 53 year old former farmer of Japanese decent who lives near Campinas. About 120 kilometers outside of Sao Paulo and treats large numbers of people daily using indirect and/or hand-on healing techniques. On March 6, 1997, when the author visited "Dr. Fritz III"'s clinic in Sao Paulo with a group of Brazilian physicians, he was informed the about 1,400 patients had come that day. "Dr Fritz III" examined and treated the majority of the patients in less than one minute each, often asking very quick questions and then immediately beginning treatment. Most patients received injections of a dark-brown solution, which, some of the visiting doctors speculated, may be an iodine solution mixed with either alcohol or a local anesthetic. In many patients, he injected this solution near the pathological area or at an acupuncture point near the pathological area. When the needle of the syringe was in the acupuncture pint, he twirled it with his fingers several times and the withdrew it. Minor surgery was performed in about 1/5th of the patients with whom the author observed. Most of the surgical incisions were made on the midline of the tissue over the spine near the pathological area. The clamping of the blood vessels and the closings of the surgical wounds were performed by licensed surgeons or licensed nurses. Major surgery were done by "Dr. Fritz III" who used a rather primitive and unorthodox cutting technique. Except for major surgery, assistance was performed by volunteer nurses, including his wife. After the surgical wounds were closed, gauze band-aids were applied. When the surface of the gauze facing the wound was examined, it showed strong (+) Qi Gong energy according to the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. Essentially, "Dr. Fritz III"'s treatment consists of acupuncture, injection of iodine with other substances near the pathological area, and (+) Qi Gong energy stored gauze which is applied to the acupuncture point, pathological area, or the site of surgery. "Dr." Hirota is another famous psychic healer whom the author was able to meet and observe in practice while in Brazil. "Dr." Hirota has been practicing for over 20 years. He usually sees patients who come to his clinic in the mornings and he claims to treat 1,000 to 2,000 patients daily between 9 AM and 12 noon. His main treatment also appears to be the application of external Qi Gong energy through the fingers of his right-hand, in combination with Shiatsu Massage and a manual procedure resembling chiropractic manipulation.

PMID: 9188913

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

23. Insurance coverage and subsequent utilization of complementary and alternative medicine providers.

Lafferty WE, Tyree PT, Bellas AS, Watts CA, Lind BK, Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Grembowski DE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16834526

 

Source

Department of Health Services, School of Public Health and Community Medicine,UniversityofWashington,Box 357660,Seattle,WA98195,USA. billlaf@u.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Since 1996,WashingtonStatelaw has required that private health insurance cover licensed complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate how insured people usedCAMproviders and what role this played in healthcare utilization and expenditures.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis of insurance enrollees from westernWashingtonin 2002.

METHODS:

Analysis of insurance demographic data, claims files, benefit information, diagnoses,CAMand conventional provider utilization, and healthcare expenditures for 3 large health insurance companies.

RESULTS:

Among more than 600,000 enrollees, 13.7% made CAMclaims. This included 1.3% of enrollees with claims for acupuncture, 1.6% for naturopathy, 2.4% for massage, and 10.9% for chiropractic. Patients enrolled in preferred provider organizations and point-of-service products were notably more likely to useCAM than those with health maintenance organization coverage. The use ofCAM was greater among women and among persons 31 to 50 years of age. The use of chiropractic was more frequent in less populous counties. TheCAM provider visits usually focused on musculoskeletal complaints except for naturopathic physicians, who treated a broader array of problems. The median per-visit expenditures were 39.00 dollars forCAM care and 74.40 dollars for conventional outpatient care. The total expenditures per enrollee were 2589 dollars, of which 75 dollars(2.9%) was spent onCAM.

CONCLUSIONS:

The number of people usingCAMinsurance benefits was substantial; the effect on insurance expenditures was modest. Because the long-term trajectory ofCAMcost under third-party payment is unknown, utilization of these services should be followed.

PMID: 16834526

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC1513668

Free PMC Article

 

24. Complementary alternative medicine use among Chinese Americans: findings from a community mental health service population.

Fang L, Schinke SP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17325116

 

Source

Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, USA. lf2057@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Complementary alternative medicine use among Asian Americans is widespread, yet poorly understood. This study explored its use among Chinese Americans reporting mental health symptoms.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey determined the prevalence and correlates of complementary alternative medicine use in an urban sample seen at a community mental health service.

RESULTS:

Out of 153 Chinese-American patients, 126 (82%) reported current use of complementary therapies (megavitamin therapy, 46%; herbal medicine, 43%; massage, acupuncture, and spiritual healing, about 25% each). Compared with nonusers, users were older, female, employed, less well functioning physically, and less acculturated.

CONCLUSIONS:

Growing immigrant populations and increasing mental health services consumption by members of ethnic-racial groups in theUnited Statescall for more attention to complementary alternative medicine use and its potential to aid conventional medical and mental services delivery.

PMID: 17325116

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

25. Complementary therapy use amongst Emergency Medicine patients.

Yates KM, Armour MJ, Pena A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19632550

 

Source

Emergency Care Centre, North Shore Hospital, Private Bag 93503, Takapuna, Auckland, New Zealand. kim.yates@waitematadhb.govt.nz

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the percentage of Emergency Medicine patients using Complementary Therapies (CTs), to investigate what types of CTs are used most commonly, and to gauge the acceptability of studies of CT effectiveness in a hospital setting.

METHOD:

Prospective cross sectional survey using a convenience sample of adult patients, presenting to the Emergency Care Centre at North Shore Hospital in Auckland, New Zealand between December 2004 and March 2006. The survey questionnaire collected demographic data, information on CT usage and attitudes to studies of CTs. Descriptive statistics with 95% confidence intervals are reported. Comparisons of proportions were made using Chi-Square or Fisher exact.

RESULTS:

56.1% of participants had used a CT. Vitamins and minerals (21.2%), massage (13.4%), acupuncture (10.6%) were the most commonly used CTs. 53.3% of those using herbs or complementary medicines had not told their doctor. When compared to those who had not used CTs, respondents who had previously used CTs were both more likely to follow their doctor's advice to use a CT (71.7% vs. 55.3%, p=0.0035), and to participate in a study of CT effectiveness (65.0% vs. 45.4%, p=0.0007).

CONCLUSIONS:

More than half the patients surveyed had used CT in the past and more than half had not told their doctor. The majority of Emergency Medicine patients would follow the advice of their doctor if a CT was advised, and would agree to participate in a study of CT effectiveness, suggesting that such studies are practical in a hospital setting.

PMID: 19632550

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

26. Evaluating a complementary therapies clinic: outcomes and relationships.

Harris P, Atkins RC, Alwyn T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20129407

 

Source

Centre for Complementary Therapies, Cardiff School of Health Sciences, University of Wales Institute Cardiff, Western Avenue, Cardiff, Wales, UK. peharris@uwic.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are few published examples of research examining the effect of massage, aromatherapy, and reflexology in clinic settings. In addition to measuring treatment outcomes, it may also be important to measure the quality of the relationship between the client and therapist and assess its contribution to outcomes.

AIMS:

To evaluate perceived changes in client quality of life following treatment; to determine whether the relationship between the client and therapist predicts the outcome of treatment; to assess the usefulness of the measures used.

METHOD:

The Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2) and the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) were used to collect data from 66 clients and 13 therapists in a complementary therapies clinic in South Wales.

RESULTS:

The MYMOP2 data showed significant improvements for client symptoms and activity but not for well-being. A low correlation was found between MYMOP2 profile scores and WAI scores suggesting that symptoms, activity and well-being were associated with a positive working alliance but this narrowly failed to achieve statistical significance.

CONCLUSION:

Further research is necessary to confirm improvements in client quality of life and to establish causes. More research is needed to examine the client-therapist relationship and treatment outcome.

Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20129407

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

27. Demographic, behavioral, and health correlates of complementary and alternative medicine and prayer use among midlife women: 2002.

Upchurch DM, Dye CE, Chyu L, Gold EB, Greendale GA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20088655

 

Source

UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, California 90095-1772, USA. upchurch@ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study investigated the demographic, behavioral, and health correlates of the most frequently used types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy and the use of prayer for health among midlife women. We also examined the extent to which women used CAM for treatment of health conditions, including menopausal symptoms, and for general health and well-being.

METHODS:

Data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a cross-sectional, household survey representative of the U.S. civilian adult population, were used. Midlife women aged 40-59 years (n = 5849) were analyzed. Bivariate prevalence estimates were obtained, and binomial logistic regression models were estimated; all analyses were weighted.

RESULTS:

Overall, 46% of midlife women used any type of CAM in the past 12 months, and 54% reported using prayer for health reasons. The top five specific CAM therapies used were herbs and natural products; relaxation techniques; chiropractic care; yoga, tai chi, or qi gong; and massage. Multivariate results demonstrated different patterns of association between demographic, health, and behavioral characteristics and specific CAM therapies. A higher percentage of women used chiropractic care for an existing health condition than those using relaxation techniques, and few women used CAM specifically for menopausal symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM and prayer are frequently used by midlife women, and herbs and natural supplements are the mostly frequently used. The findings underscore the importance, particularly in the clinical setting, of asking women about their use of individual CAM therapies. Such clinical assessment is also important because of the potential for interactions of CAM therapies with prescribed therapies.

PMID: 20088655

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC2828262

 

28. Contextualizing integration: a critical social science approach to integrative health care.

Adams J, Hollenberg D, Lui CW, Broom A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20004808

 

Source

School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. j.adams@sph.uq.edu.au

Abstract

This article argues for the importance of examining the phenomenon of integrative health care in broader social and historical contexts. The authors examine mainstream approaches to identify patterns of integrative medicine and criticize them for their neglect of clashes among different philosophical paradigms and the wider social contexts that govern health care in practice. The authors outline a framework and highlight the values of a critical social science perspective in deepening our understanding of recent transformations in health care practice and issues surrounding biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine (including chiropractic, naturopathy, massage, acupuncture/oriental medicine, etc) and traditional medicine. A critical social science perspective pays special attention to complex power relations, inclusionary/exclusionary strategies, and interprofessional dynamics in medicine. Drawing upon recent research findings, the authors illustrate how such a perspective reveals the intricacies and tensions that surround the integration of different paradigms of health care practice. The authors summarize the importance of situating integrative health care in structural contexts and affirm their commitment to a critical social science approach.

PMID: 20004808

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

29. Pediatric vaccination and vaccine-preventable disease acquisition: associations with care by complementary and alternative medicine providers.

Downey L, Tyree PT, Huebner CE, Lafferty WE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19760163

 

Source

Harborview Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 359765, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, USA. ldowney@u.washington.edu

Abstract

This study investigated provider-based complementary/alternative medicine use and its association with receipt of recommended vaccinations by children aged 1-2 years and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease by children aged 1-17 years. Results were based on logistic regression analysis of insurance claims for pediatric enrollees covered by two insurance companies in Washington State during 2000-2003. Primary exposures were use of chiropractic, naturopathy, acupuncture, or massage practitioner services by pediatric enrollees or members of their immediate families. Outcomes included receipt by children aged 1-2 years of four vaccine combinations (or their component vaccines) covering seven diseases, and acquisition of vaccine-preventable diseases by enrollees aged 1-17 years. Children were significantly less likely to receive each of the four recommended vaccinations if they saw a naturopathic physician. Children who saw chiropractors were significantly less likely to receive each of three of the recommended vaccinations. Children aged 1-17 years were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with a vaccine-preventable disease if they received naturopathic care. Use of provider-based complementary/alternative medicine by other family members was not independently associated with early childhood vaccination status or disease acquisition. Pediatric use of complementary/alternative medicine in Washington State was significantly associated with reduced adherence to recommended pediatric vaccination schedules and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease. Interventions enlisting the participation of complementary/alternative medicine providers in immunization awareness and promotional activities could improve adherence rates and assist in efforts to improve public health.

PMID: 19760163

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2924961

[Available on 2011/11/1]

 

30. Rosen Method Bodywork: an exploratory study of an uncharted complementary therapy.

Hoffren-Larsson R, Gustafsson B, Falkenberg T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19697993

 

Source

Unit for Studies of Integrative Health Care, Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. Riitta.Hoffren-Larsson@ki.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This exploratory study examines the Rosen Method Bodywork (RMB), a complementary (CAM) therapy method that previously lacked scientific documentation. The objectives of this study were to describe (1) why clients consult RMB and (2) what kind of help or benefit (if any) the clients perceive.

METHODS:

The study comprised a survey of 53 Swedish RMB clients sampled from therapists, based on a criterion of personal experience of the therapy method, responding to a questionnaire collecting both qualitative and quantitative data. The quantitative data were analyzed descriptively and the qualitative data were analyzed by applying content analysis.

RESULTS:

Reasons to use the therapy method included physical health problems, psychological problems, and a need for personal growth. A majority of the clients reported that the therapy had helped them with their problems to "a very high" or "high" degree. The main finding is five different categories describing the benefits: enhanced psychological health, enhanced physical health, increased awareness of the mind-body connection, support for personal growth, and self-initiated life changes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most RMB clients in this study indicated satisfaction with the treatment. The perceived benefits were found to be related to five separate categories. However, the results of this exploratory study cannot be generalized to a target population or to any conclusions about causality, as there is reason to assume that clients with positive experiences were overrepresented in the study population, due to the selection procedure. The results indicate that an analysis focusing on the interaction between client and therapist from a nursing theoretical perspective may increase the knowledge about mechanisms that create perceived benefits, since several aspects of the therapy seem to be related to high-quality nursing.

PMID: 19697993

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

31 Are there differences in the assessment of medical and non-medical interventions?].

[Article in German]

Raspe H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19645338

 

Source

Institut für Sozialmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck. heiner.raspe@uk-sh.de

Abstract

Usually medical and/or non-medical interventions are applied to treat both acute and chronic disease. The non-medical measures include a broad range of heterogeneous principles, among them surgical, physical, technical and psychological ones. Not uncommonly, these measures derive from particular theoretical concepts. They frequently involve complex interventions, that is, programmes with varying combinations of different interacting measures. It has been postulated by advocates of the so called complementary medicine that 'different treatment concepts and hence different assessment methods' not only do, but must exist. This claim will be examined in a four-step procedure, and it will be demonstrated that this claim cannot be maintained: 1) in the face of the German Social Code, Book V Para. 35b Sect. 1, 2) with respect to the required and available knowledge base, 3) against the background of professionally approved international standards of EbM and 4) the requirements of scientific acceptance of psychotherapeutic methods and procedures.

PMID: 19645338

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

32. Preventive screening of women who use complementary and alternative medicine providers.

Downey L, Tyree PT, Lafferty WE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19630554

 

Source

Department of Health Services, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-9455, USA. ldowney@u.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many women use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Although CAM use has been associated with reductions in conventionally recommended pediatric preventive care (e.g., vaccination), little is known about associations between CAM use and receipt of recommended preventive screening in women.

METHODS:

Using Washington State insurance data from 2000 to 2003, the authors generated clustered logistic regression models, examining associations between provider-based CAM use and receipt of screening tests for Chlamydia trachomatis, breast cancer, and cervical cancer: (1) contrasting women who used CAM providers only (alternative use) and women who used both conventional and CAM providers (complementary use) with women who used conventional care only and (2) testing associations between screening and use of four specific CAM provider types-naturopathic physicians, chiropractors, massage therapists, and acupuncturists.

RESULTS:

Both alternative and complementary use was associated with reduced Chlamydia screening. Cancer screening increased with complementary use but decreased with alternative use of CAM. Use of naturopathy was associated with decreased mammography, whereas all four CAM therapies were positively associated with Papanicolaou testing.

CONCLUSIONS:

When used in conjunction with conventional care, use of provider-based CAM may signal high interest in various types of health-promoting behavior, including cancer screening. Negative associations between CAM and Chlamydia screening and between naturopathy and mammography require additional study. Interventions with CAM providers and their patients, aimed at improving rates of conventionally recommended screening, might encourage greater focus on preventive care, an important task when CAM providers serve as women's only contact with the healthcare system.

Comment in

PMID:

19630554

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2825724

Free PMC Article

 

33. Complementary and alternative medicine: use in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais.

[Article in Portuguese]

Neto JF, Faria AA, Figueiredo MF.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19629349

 

 

Source

Departamento de Clínica Médica, Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros, Montes Claros, MG. joao.felicio@unimontes.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine prevalence of utilization and social and economic profile of those using complementary and alternative medicine in the medium sized Brazilian city of Montes Claros, MG.

METHODS:

A transversal descriptive study was conducted. The sample of 3090 people was probabilistic, by clusters using the household as the sample unit for interview of both genders, older than 18 years. Data were collected by semi-structured questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Utilization of complementary and alternative medicine was of 8.9% when only those involving costs such as homeopathy, acupuncture, chiropractics, techniques of relaxation/ meditation and massage are considered and of 70.0%, when all therapies found were included. Prevalent were prayers to God (52.0%), popular medicines (30.9%), physical exercises (25.5%), faith healers (15.0%), popular diets (7.1%), massage (4.9%), relaxation/meditation (2.8%), homeopathy (2.4%), and groups of self-help (1.9%), chiropractics (1.7%), acupuncture (1.5%) and orthomolecular medicine (0.2%). Women, Catholic, married of higher income and education were positively associated with utilization of therapies involving expenses.

CONCLUSIONS:

Complementary and alternative medicine is used by a significant number of those interviewed. Gender, religion, marital status, income and education were positively associated with utilization of complementary and alternative medicine. Access of those with less income and education could increase the utilization of the options that involve expenses.

PMID: 19629349

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

34. Reasons for referrals of children and adolescents to alternative medicine in southern Israel.

Erez C, Reuveni H, Freud T, Peleg R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19489708

 

Source

Soroka Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased over recent years. Little is known about the use of CAM by children and adolescents. The study objectives were to characterize reasons for referrals and types of therapy for children and adolescents who turned to a CAM clinic.

DESIGN:

An observational study with prospective collection of data through interviews with the parents conducted by the clinic triage physician using questionnaires.

SUBJECTS:

Parents of children and adolescents who came for treatment to a CAM clinic.

INTERVENTION:

None.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The medical reasons for using CAM.

RESULTS:

The parents of 86 (55%) of the children who came for CAM in the study period, November 2005 to June 2006, participated in the study (54 males, 62.8%). The mean patient age was 6.75 years (median, 4.79). The most common reasons for CAM were immunological and allergy problems (30%), infectious diseases (21.4%), and attention deficit and concentration disorders (14.6%). The most common treatment modalities for children and adolescents were homeopathy (33.7%), reflexology (29.7%), and acupuncture (18.8%). Most of the immunological problems (58.1%) and the infectious diseases (66.7%) were referred for homeopathy, and most of the attention deficit and concentration disorders (66.7%) were treated by reflexology. Nonmedical reasons for CAM included disappointment with the results of conventional treatment; the desire for effective, innocuous, supplemental therapy; and previous experience among parents, friends, and family members.

CONCLUSIONS:

Demand for CAM therapy for children is driven by universal factors. CAM can be an adjuvant therapy for children with common chronic pediatric problems.

PMID: 19489708

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

35. A survey of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) awareness among neurosurgeons in Washington State.

Wu C, Weber W, Kozak L, Standish LJ, Ojemann JG, Ellenbogen RG, Avellino AM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19450166

 

Source

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by the U.S. population increased significantly in the past 2 decades. To maximize a patient's recovery from a neurosurgical procedure, it is critical that neurosurgeons be aware of the benefits and potential adverse complications of CAM therapies. The survey's purpose was to assess the current patterns of CAM utilization by neurosurgery patients and neurosurgeon knowledge of CAM therapies among Washington State Association of Neurological Surgeons (WSANS) members.

METHODS:

Members of the WSANS were surveyed in 2005. The survey was sent via e-mail and the data were anonymously collected using an online survey tool, Catalyst WebQ.

RESULTS:

The majority of responses (79%) stated that their neurosurgery practice was > or =75% adults. Acupuncture, herbs, massage therapy, prayer, and yoga were the most common CAM treatments patients used or discussed with their neurosurgeon. Fifty percent (50%) of neurosurgeons discussed the use of acupuncture among their colleagues. Concerning prayer and spirituality, 38% of the surveyed neurosurgeons stated that > or =25% of their patients have disclosed that they pray for their health; 42% stated that spirituality and prayer may affect neurosurgery outcome; and 38% stated that they pray for their patients. Overall, 63% of surveyed neurosurgeons stated that CAM treatments have a role in neurosurgery.

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of CAM may influence neurosurgical care; and the role of spirituality and prayer should be further explored. Because CAM utilization is ubiquitous, open discussion and familiarity with CAM treatments are becoming increasingly important in the field of neurosurgery.

PMID: 19450166

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

36. Delphi-derived development of a common core for measuring complementary and alternative medicine prevalence.

Lachance LL, Hawthorne V, Brien S, Hyland ME, Lewith GT, Verhoef MJ, Warber S, Zick S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19422299

 

Source

Center for Managing Chronic Disease, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029, USA. lauriel@umich.edu

Abstract

Assessing complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use remains difficult due to many problems, not the least of which is defining therapies and modalities that should be considered as CAM. Members of the International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR) participated in a Delphi process to identify a core listing of common CAM therapies presently in use in Western countries. Lists of practitioner-based and self-administered CAM were constructed based on previous population-based surveys and ranked by ISCMR researchers by perceived level of importance. A total of 64 (49%) ISCMR members responded to the first round of the Delphi process, and 39 of these (61%) responded during the second round. There was agreement across all geographic regions (United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Western Europe) for the inclusion of herbal medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), chiropractic, naturopathy, osteopathy, Ayurvedic medicine, and massage therapy in the core practitioner-based CAM list, and for homeopathy products, herbal supplements, TCM products, naturopathic products, and nutritional products in the self-administered list. This Delphi process, along with the existing literature, has demonstrated that (1) separate lists are required to measure practitioner-based and self-administered CAM; (2) timeframes should include both ever use and recent use; (3) researchers should measure and report prevalence estimates for each individual therapy so that direct comparisons can be made across studies, time, and populations; (4) the list of CAM therapies should include a core list and additionally those therapies appropriate to the geographic region, population, and the specific research questions addressed, and (5) intended populations and samples studied should be defined by the researcher so that the generalizability of findings can be assessed. Ultimately, it is important to find out what CAM modality people are using and if they are being helped by these interventions.

PMID: 19422299

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

37. Derivative benefits: exploring the body through complementary and alternative medicine.

Baarts C, Pedersen IK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19392940

 

Source

Department of Sociology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. cba@soc.ku.dk

Abstract

Since the 1960s, in Western societies, there has been a striking growth of consumer interest in complementary or alternative medicine (CAM). In order to make this increased popularity intelligible this paper challenges stereotypical images of users' motives and the results of clinical studies of CAM by exploring bodily experiences of acupuncture, reflexology treatments, and mindfulness training. The study draws on 138 in-depth interviews with 46 clients, client diaries and observations of 92 clinical treatments in order to identify bodily experiences of health and care: experiences that are contested between forces of mastery, control and resistance. We discuss why clients continue to use CAM even when the treatments do not help or even after they have been relieved of their physiological or mental problems. The encounter between the client and CAM produces derivative benefits such as a fresh and sustained sense of bodily responsibility that induces new health practices.

PMID: 19392940

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

38. Complementary and alternative medicine use among adults and children: United States, 2007.

Barnes PM, Bloom B, Nahin RL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19361005

 

Source

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This report presents selected estimates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among U.S. adults and children, using data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Trends in adult use were assessed by comparing data from the 2007 and 2002 NHIS.

METHODS:

Estimates were derived from the Complementary and Alternative Medicine supplements and Core components of the 2007 and 2002 NHIS. Estimates were generated and comparisons conducted using the SUDAAN statistical package to account for the complex sample design.

RESULTS:

In 2007, almost 4 out of 10 adults had used CAM therapy in the past 12 months, with the most commonly used therapies being nonvitamin, nonmineral, natural products (17.7%) and deep breathing exercises (12.7%). American Indian or Alaska Native adults (50.3%) and white adults (43.1%) were more likely to use CAM than Asian adults (39.9%) or black adults (25.5%). Results from the 2007 NHIS found that approximately one in nine children (11.8%) used CAM therapy in the past 12 months, with the most commonly used therapies being nonvitamin, nonmineral, natural products (3.9%) and chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation (2.8%). Children whose parent used CAM were almost five times as likely (23.9%) to use CAM as children whose parent did not use CAM (5.1%). For both adults and children in 2007, when worry about cost delayed receipt of conventional care, individuals were more likely to use CAM than when the cost of conventional care was not a worry. Between 2002 and 2007 increased use was seen among adults for acupuncture, deep breathing exercises, massage therapy, meditation, naturopathy, and yoga. CAM use for head or chest colds showed a marked decrease from 2002 to 2007 (9.5% to 2.0%).

PMID: 19361005

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

39. Nurses' experiences of practicing the HeartTouch technique for one month.

Jelonek Walker M.

Source

Lauterstein-Conway School of Massage, Austin, TX 78736, USA. walkerj@io.com

Abstract

Stress plays a significant role in almost every aspect of health. Appraisal (thoughts and feelings) of a situation determines the level of stress experienced.

PURPOSE:

To describe the nurses' experiences of practicing the HeartTouch (HRTT) technique, an internal tool designed to help nurses change their thoughts and feelings, especially in stressful situations.

METHOD:

After an education session discussing the effects of thoughts and feelings on stress and health, nurses learn HRTT. After practicing HRTT for 1 month during their daily life, 48 nurses answer 7 open-ended questions about their experience. Content analysis is used to analyze the data.

FINDINGS:

Nurses notice physical, mental, and emotional benefits for themselves, patients, colleagues, and family members. Nurses feel less stressed and experience an increased sense of control and ability to notice and change their thoughts and feelings. Nurses also discuss meaningful connections with self, others, and a Higher Power and greater work satisfaction.

PMID: 19126880

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

40. Complementary and alternative medicine: attitudes and patterns of use by German physicians in a national survey.

Stange R, Amhof R, Moebus S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19123879

 

Source

Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. r.stange@immanuel.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To generate valid data on attitudes about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as well as patterns of use in a large stochastic sample of general practitioner physicians and specialists.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey in a large random sample of 516 German outpatient care physicians with qualifications in 13 medical fields representative of a basic population of 118,085 statutory health insurance physicians.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Telephone interviews with 36 wide-ranging questions about CAM attitudes and preferred techniques were conducted in November and December 2005 as part of a national healthcare survey.

RESULTS:

In our sample, 51% were in favor of CAM use (26% were very much in favor, 25% were in favor). The methods most frequently prescribed (combining answers for "very often" and "at times") were physical therapy (71%), phytomedicine (67%), exercise (63%), nutrition and dieting (62%), massage (61%), relaxation techniques (55%), followed by more typical CAM interventions such as homeopathy (38%), acupuncture (37%), and traditional Chinese medicine (18%). Primary care physicians were significantly more inclined to use CAM than were specialists. No striking differences were observed with respect to gender or age.

CONCLUSIONS:

This survey demonstrates a broader acceptance and practice of CAM by physicians than hitherto believed. Methods traditionally known as "natural medicine" were more frequently used than more typical CAM procedures. Further research should focus on physicians' differing motivations and observed results.

Comment in

PMID: 19123879

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

41. Classification of complementary and alternative medical practices: Family physicians' ratings of effectiveness.

Fries CJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19005130

 

Source

Department of Sociology, 317 Isbister Bldg, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB. CJ_Fries@umanitoba.ca

Abstract

ABSTRACTOBJECTIVETo develop a classification of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices widely available in Canada based on physicians' effectiveness ratings of the therapies.DESIGNA self-administered postal questionnaire asking family physicians to rate their "belief in the degree of therapeutic effectiveness" of 15 CAM therapies.SETTINGProvince of Alberta.PARTICIPANTSA total of 875 family physicians.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESDescriptive statistics of physicians' awareness of and effectiveness ratings for each of the therapies; factor analysis was applied to the ratings of the 15 therapies in order to explore whether or not the data support the proposed classification of CAM practices into categories of accepted and rejected.RESULTSPhysicians believed that acupuncture, massage therapy, chiropractic care, relaxation therapy, biofeedback, and spiritual or religious healing were effective when used in conjunction with biomedicine to treat chronic or psychosomatic indications. Physicians attributed little effectiveness to homeopathy or naturopathy, Feldenkrais or Alexander technique, Rolfing, herbal medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, and reflexology. The factor analysis revealed an underlying dimensionality to physicians' effectiveness ratings of the CAM therapies that supports the classification of these practices as either accepted or rejected.CONCLUSIONThis study provides Canadian family physicians with information concerning which CAM therapies are generally accepted by their peers as effective and which are not.

PMID: 19005130

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2592334

Free PMC Article

 

42. Complementary and alternative medicine use among Chinese and white Canadians.

Quan H, Lai D, Johnson D, Verhoef M, Musto R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19005129

 

Source

University of Calgary, Community Health Sciences, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, AB. hquan@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

ABSTRACTOBJECTIVEThis study aimed to describe the level of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and the factors associated with CAM use among Chinese and white Canadians.DESIGNA cross-sectional telephone survey conducted in English, Cantonese, and Mandarin.SETTINGCalgary, Alta.PARTICIPANTSChinese and white residents of Calgary aged 18 or older.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESRates of use of 11 CAM therapies, particularly herbal therapy, massage, chiropractic care, and acupuncture; reasons for use of CAM therapies.RESULTSSixty percent of 835 Chinese respondents (95% confidence interval [CI] 56.5% to 63.2%) and 59% of 802 white respondents (95% CI 55.1% to 62.0%) had used CAM in the past year. Chinese respondents were more likely to use herbal therapy than white respondents were (48.7% vs 33.7%, P < .001), less likely to use massage (17.1% vs 30.4%, P < .001) and chiropractic care (8.4% vs 21.2%, P < .001), but equally likely to use acupuncture (8.3% vs 7.9%, P = .173). The common factor associated with herbal therapy, acupuncture, or massage use among Chinese and white respondents was receiving a CAM recommendation from a family member or friend. Factors unique to either Chinese or white CAM users varied by therapy. For example, herbal therapy use for Chinese respondents was associated with the presence of chronic disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.15, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.24 for having 3 diseases compared with those without chronic disease), beliefs about the effectiveness of herbal therapy (AOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.17), and trust in herbal therapy practitioners (AOR 1.72, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.37). Herbal therapy use for white respondents was associated with the beliefs that herbal treatment had fewer side effects than prescription drugs (AOR 1.81, 95% CI 1.31 to 2.50) and that herbalists took a holistic approach (AOR 2.07, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.87).CONCLUSIONWhile the percentage of CAM use was similar in both groups, Chinese Canadians mainly used herbal therapy and white Canadians used a range of CAM therapies. Factors associated with CAM use varied with ethnicity and type of CAM therapy. Presence of chronic disease, however, was an important factor for Chinese Canadians. That finding suggests that Chinese Canadians use CAM for the treatment of chronic disease, while white Canadians use such therapies for disease treatment and health maintenance.

PMID: 19005129

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2592333

Free PMC Article

 

43. Complementary and alternative medicine use among older urban African Americans: individual and neighborhood associations.

Ryder PT, Wolpert B, Orwig D, Carter-Pokras O, Black SA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18942280

 

Source

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21201, USA. pryder@rx.umaryland.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Older African Americans may be vulnerable to risks due to impaired healthcare access and understudied complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and other traditions. We describe CAM use among older African Americans in Baltimore, MD, examining associations among CAM and sociodemographic, health status, healthcare utilization and neighborhood factors.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional telephone survey of 95 African Americans ages > or =60 on use of CAM modalities (herb/home remedies, prayer, group spiritual practices, meditation/visualization, massage, chiropractic, acupuncture, relaxation/biofeedback) in prior year.

RESULTS:

A large majority (88.4%) reported CAM use in the previous year: 50.5% reported CAM use excluding individual prayer. The most commonly reported modalities were individual prayer (96.8%), herbs/home remedies (29.5%) and group spiritual practices (17.0%). Most (77.3%) herbal/home remedy users disclosed use to providers. In multivariable logistic regression at the individual level, CAM was associated with higher number of comorbidities (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06-1.45), older age (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.17) and more years of education (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.03-1.49). Adding neighborhood variables attenuated effects of comorbidity (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.99-1.39); residence in more racially integrated neighborhoods (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.00-1.06; p = 0.047) was also important.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM use was greater than expected. Although disclosure of herb use was high, providers should probe for CAM use.

PMID: 18942280

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

44. Inpatients' use, understanding, and attitudes towards traditional, complementary and alternative therapies at a provincial New Zealand hospital.

Evans A, Duncan B, McHugh P, Shaw J, Wilson C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18670472

 

Source

School of Pharmacy, University of Auckland, Private Bag , Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

AIM:

To assess the use and attitudes towards traditional, complementary and alternative medicine and therapies (TCAM) by inpatients of a provincial hospital.

METHODS:

Ninety-two Gisborne Hospital inpatients were interviewed face-to-face over a 4-week period using a standardised questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Of the 92 people interviewed, 84 patients (91%) had used an average of 6.4 TCAM modalities. Most common therapies used were massage (n=62), vitamins (n=5), chiropractor (n=45), and herbal therapies (n=41). Of the 84 people who have used TCAM, 79 (94%) used more than one therapy. Nineteen patients (23%) used 10 or more different therapies. Maori and Non-Maori respondents used the majority of TCAM modalities equally apart from a few notable exceptions. Only 10 (11%) of the 92 patients in this study recalled having been asked by a doctor if they were using TCAM. Fifty-five (65%) of those who use TCAM believed that it is safe.

CONCLUSION:

This study of in-patients interviewed at Gisborne Hospital had the highest rate of TCAM use published to date. Most of these patients intend to continue using TCAM (86%), seek pluralistic care for their maladies and select from a broad array of modalities rooted in the community. Patients are not telling their doctors about this use, not because patients fear disapproval, but they are simply not being asked. Patients do not volunteer this information because they believe that TCAM use is safe and are unaware of its potential risks. There are ethnic trends in the selection of TCAM modalities and potential exists to reach some hard to reach populations through integrated care. The high prevalence of TCAM use in an in-patient population and patients' naivety regarding risks and interactions underscores the need for greater cooperation between orthodox and complementary practitioners, effective regulation with emphasis given to public safety, the need for new funding for TCAM research, increased undergraduate and postgraduate medical TCAM education, and better information made available to the public.

Comment in

PMID: 18670472

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

45. Clinical holistic medicine: avoiding the Freudian trap of sexual transference and countertransference in psychodynamic therapy.

Ventegodt S, Kandel I, Merrick J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454245

 

Source

Quality of Life Research Center, Classensgade 11C, 1 sal, DK-2100 Copenhagen O,Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org

Abstract

Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an "idealized father" figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem "Freud's Trap". Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient's internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

PMID: 18454245

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

46. Patterns of complementary and alternative medicine use amongst outpatients in Tokyo, Japan.

Hori S, Mihaylov I, Vasconcelos JC, McCoubrie M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18433476

 

Source

Department of Urology, West Suffolk Hospital, Bury St, Edmunds, UK. satoshi@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been increasing rapidly throughout the world during the past decade. The use of CAM in the general Japanese population has been previously reported to be as high as 76%. This study aims to investigate the patterns of CAM use, perceived effectiveness and disclosure of CAM use to orthodox medical practitioners amongst patients attending typical primary and secondary care clinics in a busy district general hospital in Tokyo, Japan.

METHODS:

The authors analysed data collected during March 2002 on patients attending general outpatient clinics held at Shiseikai Daini Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Data was collected by use of self-completed questionnaires distributed to patients in the outpatient clinics waiting area. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square tests of independence.

RESULTS:

515 adults were approached to participate in this study and the overall response rate was 96% (n = 496). 50% of the patients were using or have used at least 1 CAM therapy within the last 12 months. The 5 most commonly used therapies were massage (n = 106, 43%), vitamins (n = 85, 35%), health foods including dietary supplements (n = 56, 23%), acupressure (n = 51, 21%) and kampo (n = 46, 19%). The majority of CAM users (75%, n = 145) found their CAM treatment to be effective (95% CI = 68-81%). Patients who were more likely to use CAM were females (p = 0.003) and those with a high number of medical conditions (p = < 0.0001). Only a small proportion of patients reported their CAM use to their physician (42%, n = 74). There was no significant difference in CAM use for the different age groups (p = 0.85), education level (p = 0.30) and financial status (p = 0.82).

CONCLUSION:

Patterns of CAM usage in the sample surveyed was high (50%). Despite this high prevalence rate and presumed acceptance of CAM in Japan, the reporting of CAM use by patients to their physicians was low (42%). It is therefore important that physicians are aware of the possibility that their patients may be using CAM and also increase their knowledge and understanding of these treatments.

PMID: 18433476

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2375857

Free PMC Article

 

47. Use of complementary medicinal therapies in West Pomerania: a population-based study.

Schwarz S, Messerschmidt H, Völzke H, Hoffmann W, Lucht M, Dören M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18365855

 

Source

Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Clinical Research Center of Women's Health, Berlin.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Prior studies suggested a high prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Germany. The objectives of this study were (1) to describe in more detail the utilization of CAM, (2) to compare characteristics between CAM users and non-users, and (3) to delineate information on source of prescription and insurance coverage of 14 specific CAM therapies.

METHODS:

We extracted information derived from a computer-aided personal interview on the use of CAM, medical history, behavioral, and sociodemographic characteristics, all of which were generated by the Study of Health in Pomerania (formerly part of East Germany), a cross-sectional population-based survey. We analyzed data from 4291 individuals aged 20-79 years.

RESULTS:

Use of any CAM within the previous year was reported by 6.0% of the population. The modality used most widely among CAM users was active and passive exercise therapy (including various massage therapies). CAM users, when compared to non-users, were more likely to be female, experienced more years of education, were more physically active, less often overweight, reported a lower self-rated physical health status, and were more likely to visit an outpatient facility during the last year. There were higher proportions of several chronic diseases in CAM users than non-users. The results of this survey suggest that CAM therapies were most often utilized to alleviate pain. Most CAM therapies were prescribed by a physician. Reimbursement schemes were complex and differed according to therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

The low estimate of CAM use might be explained by specific characteristics of the study region, including changes after the German reunification. CAM users and non-users differ with respect to several behavioral, sociodemographic and medical characteristics.

PMID: 18365855

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

48. Complementary and alternative medicine use by older Australians.

Zhang AL, Xue CC, Lin V, Story DF.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17986583

 

Source

Division of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, P.O. Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia. tony.zhang@rmit.edu.au

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by Australians is substantial and increasing, but little is known about its use by the elderly. We here present the findings for the elderly cohort in our recently conducted national survey on CAM use by adult Australians. In May and June 2005, computer-assisted telephone interviews, using random-digit telephone dialing, were employed to gather data on CAM use in the last 12 months. Of 1067 adult participants interviewed, 178 were 65 or older. More than half of these (57.8%; 95% CI, 50.7%-64.9%) had used at least one of 17 common forms of CAM and 60.4% of the CAM users had consulted CAM practitioners. Clinical nutrition, chiropractic, massage therapy, meditation, and herbal medicine were the most common forms of CAM used by the elderly. A higher proportion of the elderly had always used both CAM and conventional medical treatments (37.9%) than had those aged 18-34 (15.7%) and 35-64 (26.9%). Elderly CAM users (60.2%) were more likely than younger users to discuss their use with their doctors. Of those who did not do so, 24.1% were not asked by their doctors and 16.0% considered that their doctor would disapprove. In conclusion, we found that a substantial proportion of older Australians use CAM. The elderly are also more likely than younger adults to discuss their use of CAM with their doctors, but doctors need to play a more active role in initiating such communication.

PMID: 17986583

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

49. Personality does not predict treatment preference, treatment experience does: a study of four complementary pain treatments.

Blasche G, Melchart H, Leitner D, Marktl W.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17971668

 

Source

Department of Physiology, University of Vienna, Schwarzspanierstrasse 17, 1090 Vienna, Austria. gerhard.blasche@meduniwien.ac.at

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which personality and treatment experience affect patients' appraisals of 4 complementary treatments for chronic pain.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 232 chronic pain patients (164 females, 68 males, average age 56.6 years) visiting a spa clinic in Austria returned a questionnaire on patient characteristics and personality (autonomy, depressiveness, assertiveness, self-control) as well as attitudes towards (i.e. appealing, effective, pleasant) and experience of the treatments. Results were analysed by use of linear regression analysis and confidence intervals.

RESULTS:

Although all treatments were appraised positively, the passive treatments (thermal water tub baths, classical massage) were favoured more than the active treatments (relaxation training or exercise therapy). Treatment appraisal was not predicted by any of the personality traits but to a large extent by treatment experience. Relaxing, not unpleasant treatments were the most highly esteemed treatments. How strenuous or tiring a treatment was only had a minor effect on its appraisal.

CONCLUSIONS:

Neither do dependent, passive patients prefer passive treatments, nor do conscientious patients prefer active treatments. Instead, the appraisal of treatments that induce specific somatosensory sensations is largely determined by treatment experiences, i.e. what the treatment feels like. Despite the popularity of CAM which encompasses many experientially intensive treatments, treatment experience has to date been a neglected topic of treatment research.

PMID: 17971668

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

50. Predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use among older Mexican Americans.

Loera JA, Reyes-Ortiz C, Kuo YF.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17950177

 

Source

Department of Internal Medicine-Geriatrics Division, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0460, USA. jloera@utmb.edu

Abstract

To determine predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, we used a cohort of 1445 non-institutionalized Mexican Americans aged 65 and older from the first wave (1993-1994) of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, followed until 2000-2001. The main outcome was use of any CAM (herbal medicine, chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy, relaxation techniques or spiritual healing) in the past 12 months and was assessed at 7 years of follow-up. Potential predictors of CAM use at baseline included sociodemographics, acculturation factors, and medical conditions. The overall rate of CAM use among older Mexican Americans was 31.6%. Independent predictors of higher CAM use were female gender, being on Medicaid, frequent church attendance and higher number of medical conditions. In contrast, subjects who were born in US and spoke either Spanish or English at interview had lower CAM use compared with subjects who were born in Mexico.

PMID: 17950177

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2100426

Free PMC Article

 

51. Herbal and other complementary medicine use by Texas midwives.

Bayles BP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17826710

 

Source

Center for Integrative Health, Department of Family and Community Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA. baylesb@uthscsa.edu

Abstract

This cross-sectional survey sought to document complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by Texas midwives, as well as to determine whether licensed direct-entry midwives (LMs) and certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) differed significantly in their patterns of use. All respondents (n = 69) indicated that they used, recommended, or referred their clients for at least one CAM therapy during the preceding year. Ninety percent (90%) of respondents used, recommended, or referred their clients for an herbal remedy (not including homeopathic tinctures). Herbal therapies were among the top three modalities recommended for 7 of 12 (58%) clinical indications. Herbs were the most salient CAM therapy used for cervical ripening (83%), followed closely by use for nausea, vomiting, and hyperemesis (80%), and labor induction (77%). Herbal therapies also constituted 50% or more of the CAM therapies used for the following indications: anemia/iron supplementation (70%), perineal healing (66%), and anxiety/stress/fatigue (50%). LM respondents used, recommended, or referred their clients for a greater number of herbal therapies compared to CNMs. While several of the CAM modalities used or recommended by Texas midwives show potential for clinical benefit, few have been studied sufficiently to determine their efficacy or safety during pregnancy.

PMID: 17826710

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

52. Prophylactic role for complementary and alternative medicine in perinatal programming of adult health.

Hodgson DM, Nakamura T, Walker AK.’

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17464160

 

Source

Laboratory of Neuroimmunology, School of Psychology, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia. Deborah.Hodgson@newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The health status of an individual in adulthood is proposed to be determined by events occurring in the prenatal and early postnatal period. A common early life event proven to have long lasting effects on the developing fetus is stress, including pain. Exposure of fetal and neonatal infants to repetitive psychological (e.g., maternal stress) or physiological (e.g., pain, infection, and noise) stress during this period is proposed to alter mechanisms involved in the regulation of stress, immunological maturation, pain perception, and cognition. Such changes, which persist into adulthood, may occur via alterations in the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This process is typically referred to as 'perinatal programming'. Ontogenic alterations in the development of the HPA-axis have been related to a number of adult pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma, as well as psychopathologies such as anxiety and depression. OBJECTIVE: In this review, the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as music, dietary supplements, massage and aromatherapy, in reducing perinatal stress in mothers and infants is examined. An emphasis is placed on these therapies as preventative measures which may be of value to individuals at risk of developing disease profiles associated with the consequences of adverse perinatal programming. The widening interest in perinatal programming and CAM suggests the potential for CAM to become a valuable tool in offsetting negative adult health outcomes resulting from perinatal programming associated with adverse gestational early life environments.

PMID: 17464160

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

53. Physical medicine and complementary approaches.

Venesy DA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=%22Venesy%20DA%22[Author]

 

Source

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. venesyd@ccf.org

Abstract

Medical approaches to the treatment of spine pain are the cornerstone of therapy for neck and back pain. Although these techniques are used widely, seldom have they been subjected to the scrutiny of careful randomized and controlled clinical trials. The costs of complementary treatments, such as spinal manipulation, massage therapy, and acupuncture, now are reimbursed by many medical insurance providers, but these modalities lack much scientific support. Physical medicine and complementary treatment modalities and some of the scientific studies aimed at assessing their effectiveness are reviewed.

PMID: 17445742

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

54. Tradition and modernity in Cameroon: the confrontation between social demand and biomedical logics of health services.

Beninguisse G, De Brouwere V.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17348333

 

Source

Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Santé (GRIS) and Unité de Santé Internationale, University, of Montreal, Edifice Saint-Urbain, 3875 rue Saint-Urbain 5e etage, Montreal, Quebec H3W 1V1, Canada. gervais.beninguisse@umontreal.ca

Abstract

This paper examines the cultural acceptability of biomedical obstetrical services and care across an anthropological literature review and a qualitative survey carried out in North Cameroon. The results reveal that cultural acceptability of biomedical services is impaired by a series of requirements such as a too early first prenatal visit; use in common of delivery rooms, wards and obstetrical tools; the absence of traditional healing like massage after delivery; refusal to hand over the placenta and umbilical cord to the family; and hindering the presence of family members during delivery. These evidences support a transition from normative medical system to an efficient and flexible medical system related to the expectations of the population established with its participation. This is commonly called patient-centred care.

PMID: 17348333

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

55. The impact of acupuncture and craniosacral therapy interventions on clinical outcomes in adults with asthma.

Mehl-Madrona L, Kligler B, Silverman S, Lynton H, Merrell W.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17234566

 

Source

Department of Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. lewis.mehl-madrona@usask.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Synergy has been proposed between modalities operating at different levels of action. Acupuncture and craniosacral therapy are two very different modalities for which synergy has been proposed. This study sought to test for such synergy and to determine if complementary therapies would improve pulmonary function and quality of life for people suffering from asthma, as well as reducing anxiety, depression, and medication usage.

DESIGN:

Subjects were randomly assignment to one of five groups: acupuncture, craniosacral therapy, acupuncture and craniosacral, attention control, and waiting list control.

METHODS:

Subjects received 12 sessions of equal length with pretreatment and posttreatment assessment of pulmonary function, asthma quality of life, depression, and anxiety. Medication use was also assessed.

RESULTS:

Synergy was not demonstrated. When treatment was compared with the control group, statistically treatment was significantly better than the control group in improving asthma quality of life, whereas reducing medication use with pulmonary function test results remained the same. However, the combination of acupuncture and craniosacral treatment was not superior to each therapy alone. In fact, although all active patients received 12 treatment sessions, those who received all treatments from one practitioner had statistically significant reductions in anxiety when compared with those receiving the same number of treatments from multiple practitioners. No effects on depression were found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acupuncture and/or craniosacral therapy are potentially useful adjuncts to the conventional care of adults with asthma, but the combination of the two does not provide additional benefit over each therapy alone.

PMID: 17234566

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

56. Auditing outcomes and costs of integrated complementary medicine provision--the importance of length of follow up.

Robinson N, Donaldson J, Watt H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17030296

 

Source

Centre for Complementary Healthcare & Integrated Medicine (CCHIM), Faculty of Health & Human Sciences, Thames Valley University, Walpole House, 4th Floor, 18-22 Bond Street, Ealing, London W5 5AA, UK. nicky.robinson@tvu.ac.uk

Abstract

A retrospective audit was carried out on 58 patients with chronic health problems who were referred by 22 general practitioners (GPs) for acupuncture, aromatherapy, homeopathy, massage and osteopathy, or a combination. Costs of GP consultations, prescriptions, secondary care referrals, and diagnostic tests from records of 33 of these patients were compared pre (24 months), during (mean 4.3 months) and post (mean 5.7 months) complementary medicine (CM) treatment. Patient centred outcome data included the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP) and content analysis of patient and practitioner comments. Costs of GP consultations/patient/month were significantly higher during (20.10 pounds, p<0.001) and post (17.53 pounds, p<0.01) CM treatment compared with pre-treatment costs (11.27 pounds). Total prescription costs were not significantly higher during and post-treatment than pre-treatment. Prescription costs for referred conditions were lower during (2.26 pounds) and higher post-treatment (3.75 pounds) compared with costs pre-treatment (3.24 pounds). Pre- and post-treatment MYMOP scores indicated significant improvements in health and well-being. Longer follow up, is required in order to demonstrate significant cost savings related to CM provision. Cost comparisons with conventional medicine should consider quantitative and qualitative data to capture the wider benefits experienced by patients.

PMID: 17030296

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

57. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in the general population: results from a longitudinal community study.

Rössler W, Lauber C, Angst J, Haker H, Gamma A, Eich D, Kessler RC, Ajdacic-Gross V.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16999879

 

Source

Psychiatric University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. roessler@spd.unizh.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many patients with psychological or physical problems are interested in non-medical approaches. The reasons for the growing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are not well understood considering that evidence of the effectiveness of conventional therapies is greater than ever before. We have examined data from the Zurich Study to determine trends and predictors of CAM use in Switzerland.

METHOD:

The Zurich Study is a longitudinal community study that was started in 1979 with a sample of 591 participants born in 1958 and 1959. In 1999, the last of six interview waves with face-to-face interviews was conducted. CAM use was analyzed with data from interviews in 1993 and 1999. Polytomous logistic regression analysis focused on the personal, demographic and sociocultural background of CAM users.

RESULTS:

CAM use in the last 12 months was reported by 21.9% of the participants in 1993 and by 29.5% in 1999. CAM use among those exhibiting either physical or psychological problems was in the ratio of two to one. There was a trend from alternative variants of CAM (homeopathy) to complementary ones (massage, osteopathy, acupuncture). The vast majority of CAM use was in addition to conventional therapies. Predictors of CAM use were, among others, attribution of physical complaints to stress and other psychological variables, very low education level in parents, and lacking political interest.

CONCLUSIONS:

Besides the sociocultural background, characteristics such as the psychological attribution style play an important role in CAM use. CAM use in Switzerland is mainly of a complementary rather than an alternative nature.

PMID: 16999879

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

58. Self-care dimensions of complementary and alternative medicine use among older adults.

Votova K, Wister AV.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16960457

 

Source

Department of Sociology, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of understanding about the patterns and rates of CAM use among older adults owing to a lack of research on specific types of CAM.

OBJECTIVES:

This study examines several dimensions of self-care deemed to be associated with CAM. Unmet health care needs, self-care attitudes, and spirituality are interpreted as health belief structures underlying CAM.

METHODS:

Logistic regression analysis was used to examine use of three groups of practitioner-based CAM: (a) chiropractic; (b) massage, and (c) acupuncture, homeopathy and/or naturopathy use. We analyze a subsample of 4,401 older adults drawn from the 1996/1997 and 1998/1999 waves of the Canadian National Population Health Survey.

RESULTS:

The logistic regression analyses indicate that self-care attitude and spirituality represent important predictors of practitioner-based CAM use. The associations for unmet health care needs were not supported. The strongest factors associated with CAM use were the illness context variables, which suggest that measures of need are key factors in leading individuals to seek other forms of health care.

DISCUSSION:

Practitioner-based CAM use among older adults is influenced by self-care attitude and spirituality, in addition to health status, but to varying degrees depending on the type of CAM. Support of these self-care facets suggests that there is a desire on the part of consumers to exercise choice and to participate in health care decisions when considering CAM.

Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 16960457

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

59. Complementary and alternative therapies: the nurse's role.

Fowler S, Newton L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16925002

 

Source

Morristown Memorial Hospital, NJ, USA. susan.fowler@ahsys.org

Abstract

One objective of Healthy People 2010 is to increase both quality and years of healthy life. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) encompasses strategies that can help individuals meet this goal. CAM includes therapies such as acupuncture, dietary supplements, reflexology, yoga, massage, chiropractic services, Reiki, and aromatherapy. Many CAM therapies focus on the concept of energy. The literature describes the use of CAM in individuals with neurological diseases such as dementias, multiple sclerosis, neuropathies, spinal cord injury, and epilepsy. Nurses have a unique opportunity to provide services that facilitate wholeness. They need to understand all aspects of CAM, including costs, patient knowledge, and drug interactions, if they are to promote holistic strategies for patients seeking to achieve a higher quality of life.

PMID: 16925002

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

60. Traditional Chinese medicine and Kampo: a review from the distant past for the future.

Yu F, Takahashi T, Moriya J, Kawaura K, Yamakawa J, Kusaka K, Itoh T, Morimoto S, Yamaguchi N, Kanda T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16866016

 

Source

Department of General Medicine, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan.

Abstract

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a complete system of healing that developed in China about 3000 years ago, and includes herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion and massage, etc. In recent decades the use of TCM has become more popular in China and throughout the world. Traditional Japanese medicine has been used for 1500 years and includes Kampo-yaku (herbal medicine), acupuncture and acupressure. Kampo is now widely practised in Japan and is fully integrated into the modern health-care system. Kampo is based on TCM but has been adapted to Japanese culture. In this paper we review the history and characteristics of TCM and traditional Japanese medicine, i.e. the selection of traditional Chinese herbal medicine treatments based on differential diagnosis, and treatment formulations specific for the 'Sho' (the patient's symptoms at a given moment) of Japanese Kampo--and look at the prospects for these forms of medicine.

PMID: 16866016

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

61. Complementary and alternative medicine usage by intercollegiate athletes.

Nichols AW, Harrigan R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16778544

 

Source

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96813-5534, USA. nicholsa@hawaii.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and types of provider-delivered complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used by intercollegiate student athletes attending a Division I NCAA University.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Survey methodology within a group of intercollegiate student athletes at a Division I NCAA university during the fall semester of 2004.

PARTICIPANTS:

All incoming and returning intercollegiate student athletes were invited to participate. Surveys were completed by 309 (122 women, 187 men) of 482 (64.1%) student athletes representing 20 sports (11 women's, 9 men's teams).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

A 28-item reliable and valid survey instrument that measured the use of provider delivered CAM and allopathic medical care was administered. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi2 tests, and logistic regressions.

RESULTS:

Fifty-six percent of subjects reported using CAM within the past 12 months, including a significantly higher percentage of women (67%) than men (49%) (P < 0.01). Massage was the most commonly used type (38%), followed by chiropractic (29%), Lomilomi (14%), and acupuncture (12%). CAM usage overall did not differ significantly by sport, year in college, nor ethnicity. Hawaiian, Samoan, and Tongan subjects were more likely to use the Hawaiian-originated forms of CAM. Sixty percent of respondents have a regular medical doctor, eighty percent of which are family practitioners. Forty-two percent of subjects were referred to a medical specialist within the previous three years.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM usage is common among collegiate student athletes and rates are higher than in adults nationwide and within the state of Hawai'i. This study and future investigations will increase the awareness of CAM use patterns by collegiate athletes, and hopefully improve allopathic physicians' abilities to provide optimal athletic health care.

PMID: 16778544

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

62. Use of complementary and alternative medicine and health problems.

[Article in Japanese]

Fukuda S, Watanabe E, Ono N, Tsubouchi M, Shirakawa T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16761690

 

Source

Department Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Public Health.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Remarkable growth in use of alternative and complementally medicine (CAM) has recently been noted from consume to trends, detail surveys are limited. In this study, to clarify the actual state of use of CAM and associated problem, we performed a cross sectional study in a town using a self-administrated questionnaire.

METHODS:

The questionnaire including demographic variables, subjective health status and health practices was addressed by people in Oguni town in Kumamoto. Use of kampo, supplements/healthy food, chiropractic, massage, yoga/meditation, acupuncture, kiko/thai-chi, aromatherapy/herbal medicine and hot springs was assessed in the questionnaire in terms of frequency, prescription or advice from physicians, purpose, and satisfaction.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 83.33%. Use increased with aging and female employed CAM more frequently than male subjects. Most frequently consumed were supplement/health foods in both females (47.0%) and males (35.3%). The most prescribed was Kampo in both sexes (24.8% and 11.4%) About 70% of the subjects had visited chiropractics therapies.

CONCLUSION:

From 57.0% of subjects had used at least one CAM in the past six months, a high value compared with results from other countries. The rates were particularly large in female and elderly subjects. It is thus possible that the impact of CAM on health promotion policy is not inconsequential.

PMID: 16761690

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

63. Health costs in anthroposophic therapy users: a two-year prospective cohort study.

Hamre HJ, Witt CM, Glockmann A, Ziegler R, Willich SN, Kiene H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16749921

 

Source

Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Böcklerstr, 5, 79110 Freiburg, Germany. harald.hamre@ifaemm.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anthroposophic therapies (counselling, special medication, art, eurythmy movement, and rhythmical massage) aim to stimulate long-term self-healing processes, which theoretically could lead to a reduction of healthcare use. In a prospective two-year cohort study, anthroposophic therapies were followed by a reduction of chronic disease symptoms and improvement of quality of life. The purpose of this analysis was to describe health costs in users of anthroposophic therapies.

METHODS:

717 consecutive outpatients from 134 medical practices in Germany, starting anthroposophic therapies for chronic diseases, participated in a prospective cohort study. We analysed direct health costs (anthroposophic therapies, physician and dentist consultations, psychotherapy, medication, physiotherapy, ergotherapy, hospital treatment, rehabilitation) and indirect costs (sick leave compensation) in the pre-study year and the first two study years. Costs were calculated from resource utilisation, documented by patient self-reporting. Data were collected from January 1999 to April 2003.

RESULTS:

Total health costs in the first study year (bootstrap mean 3,297 Euro; 95% confidence interval 95%-CI 3,157 Euro to 3,923 Euro) did not differ significantly from the pre-study year (3,186 Euro; 95%-CI 3,037 Euro to 3,711 Euro), whereas in the second year, costs (2,771 Euro; 95%-CI 2,647 Euro to 3,256 Euro) were significantly reduced by 416 Euro (95%-CI 264 Euro to 960 Euro) compared to the pre-study year. In each period hospitalisation and sick-leave together amounted to more than half of the total health costs. Anthroposophic therapies and medication amounted to 3%, 15%, and 8% of total health costs in the pre-study year, first year, and second study year, respectively. The cost reduction in the second year was largely accounted for by a decrease of inpatient hospitalisation, leading to a hospital cost reduction of 519 Euro (95%-CI 377 Euro to 904 Euro) compared to the pre-study year.

CONCLUSION:

In patients starting anthroposophic therapies for chronic disease, total health costs did not increase in the first year, and were reduced in the second year. This reduction was largely explained by a decrease of inpatient hospitalisation. Within the limits of a pre-post design, study findings suggest that anthroposophic therapies are not associated with a relevant increase in total health costs.

PMID: 16749921

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC1513220

Free PMC Article

 

64. Alternative therapies in Denmark--use, users and motives for the use.

[Article in Danish]

Lønroth HL, Ekholm O.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16494807

 

Source

Videns- og Forskningscenter for Alternativ Behandling (ViFAB), Arhus. hlo@vifab.dk

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study was to examine the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Denmark, possible associations between the use of CAM and various socio-economic variables, and motives for the use of CAM.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Our data derived from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey, 2003. The sample consisted of 4,000 Danish citizens aged 18 years or older, of whom 2,593 (65%) completed the interviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between the use of CAM and various socio-economic variables.

RESULTS:

The survey revealed that 40.2% had ever used CAM and 20.1% had used CAM within the last year. Of those reporting having used CAM ever, reflexology (22.7%), massage/osteopathy/other manipulative techniques (16.5%) and acupuncture (16.2%) were the most frequently used. The use of CAM was more common among women than men, among people aged 30-66 years and among people with 13-14 years of education. There was no association between marital status and CAM. Thirty-nine percent of those having ever used CAM stated that CAM is a supplement to the treatment received in the conventional Danish health care system. CAM was used mainly to treat mild symptoms/diseases (39%) and as prevention or for increased well-being (22%). More women than men stated that they wished to take an active part in their own treatment (30% versus 14%) and cited the unwanted side effects of conventional medicine (16% versus 7%) as a motive for using CAM.

CONCLUSION:

This study shows that the use of CAM is not a hot trend but the continuation of a trend that shows no signs of slowing down.

PMID: 16494807

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

65. Other complementary and alternative medicine modalities: acupuncture, magnets, reflexology, and homeopathy.

Carpenter JS, Neal JG.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16414335

 

Source

School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. carpentj@iupui.edu

Abstract

We sought to evaluate evidence for the benefits and risks of acupuncture, magnets, reflexology, and homeopathy for menopause-related symptoms. Search strategies included electronic searches of online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Medline), direct searches of target journals, and citation-index searches. A total of 12 intervention studies were identified for review. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments resulted in few side effects. The design, study populations, and findings across acupuncture studies varied. In uncontrolled studies, acupuncture improved subjective measures of hot flash frequency and vasomotor, somatic, physical, and psychological symptoms; however, improvements were not consistent. Controlled studies of acupuncture yielded even less consistent findings. Overall, controlled studies of acupuncture did not reliably improve hot flashes, sleep disturbances, or mood when compared with nonspecific acupuncture, estrogen therapy, or superficial needling. Homeopathy significantly improved subjective measures of hot flash frequency and severity, mood, fatigue, and anxiety in uncontrolled, open-label studies. Controlled studies of magnets and reflexology failed to demonstrate any increased benefit of treatment over placebo. There is a need for additional investigations of acupuncture and homeopathy for the treatment of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. However, existing evidence does not indicate a beneficial effect of magnets or reflexology in the treatment of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. Understanding whether, for whom, and how these interventions work is crucial to building the evidence base needed to evaluate any potential for these CAM therapies in the management of menopause-related symptoms.

PMID: 16414335

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

66. Use of complementary and alternative medicines among factory workers: investigation of workers in manufacturing].

[Article in Japanese]

Sawazaki K, Sakuraba H, Masudai F, Ishii C, Yokoyama K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16408437

 

Source

Faculty of Oriental Medicine, Department of Acupuncture Medicine, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001-1 Kishioka, Suzuka, Mie 510-0293, Japan. sawazaki@suzuka-u.ac.jp

Abstract

To elucidate the situation of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) in an occupational health setting, workers in a factory of a housing construction business were surveyed using self-administered questionnaires on their utilization of CAM in the past 12 months, out-of-pocket expenditures on CAM and ordinary western medicines (OWM), and reasons for the use of CAM. A total of 263 workers (84.3%) completed the questionnaires. Among them, 134 (51%) had received CAM therapy in the last 12 months: i.e. nutritional and tonic drinks (35.4%), supplements (16.3%), massage (13.7%), chiropractic or osteopathy (8.7%), health-related appliances (6.5%), herb or kampo (3.4%), aromatherapy (1.9%), acupuncture (1.9%), or other therapy (1.5%). Reasons for the use of CAM was "the condition was not serious enough to warrant OWM" and "expectation of health promotion or disease prevention" for 70 (51.9%) and 53 (39.3%) subjects, respectively. Average annual out-of-pocket expenditures for CAM and OWM were 17,500 and 21,300 yen, respectively. It seems important to further widen awareness and knowledge of CAM in occupational health.

PMID: 16408437

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

67. The integration of complementary therapies in Australian general practice: results of a national survey.

Cohen MM, Penman S, Pirotta M, Da Costa C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16398590

 

Source

School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia. marc.cohen@rmit.edu.au

Abstract

METHODS:

Australian general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward and use of a range of complementary therapies (CTs) were determined through a self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 2000 Australian GPs. The survey canvassed GPs' opinions as to the harmfulness and effectiveness of CTs; current levels of training and interest in further training; personal use of, and use in practice of, CTs; referrals to CT; practitioners; appropriateness for GPs to practice and for government regulation; perceived patient demand and the need for undergraduate education.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 33.2%. Based on GPs' responses, complementary therapies could be classified into: nonmedicinal and nonmanipulative therapies, such as acupuncture, massage, meditation, yoga, and hypnosis, that were seen to be highly effective and safe; medicinal and manipulative therapies, including chiropractic, Chinese herbal medicine, osteopathy, herbal medicine, vitamin and mineral therapy, naturopathy, and homeopathy, which more GPs considered potentially harmful than potentially effective; and esoteric therapies, such as spiritual healing, aromatherapy, and reflexology, which were seen to be relatively safe yet also relatively ineffective. The risks of CTs were seen to mainly arise from incorrect, inadequate, or delayed diagnoses and interactions between complementary medications and pharmaceuticals, rather than the specific risks of the therapies themselves.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nonmedicinal therapies along with chiropractic are widely accepted in Australia and can be considered mainstream. GPs are open to training in complementary therapies, and better communication between patients and GPs about use of CTs is required to minimize the risk of adverse events. There is also a need to prioritize and provide funding for further research into the potential adverse events from these therapies and other therapies currently lacking an evidence base.

PMID: 16398590

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

68. Health care choices: complementary therapy, chronic illness, and older rural dwellers.

Nichols E, Sullivan T, Ide B, Shreffler-Grant J, Weinert C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16251488

 

Source

Montana State University-Bozeman.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To better understand elderly rural dwellers use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAM), perception of efficacy, and their sources of information.

METHOD:

Ten participants between ages 60 and 80 years were interviewed by telephone. Qualitative analysis for content and themes was done.

FINDINGS:

Self-directed practices such as vitamin, mineral, and herbal supplements, taken to compensate for perceived dietary deficiencies, were cited most frequently. Therapies used included biofeedback, massage, chiropractic, and podiatry. Information was obtained from the physician or nurse practitioner and supplemented with material from other sources.

CONCLUSIONS:

Respondents were discriminating users of the products they selected and were satisfied with the results, although they did not always have accurate understanding of the effects of the supplement or therapy.

IMPLICATIONS:

Health professionals need to have knowledge about CAM and to include questions about use during patient encounters. Providers must take time to answer questions and provide user friendly information.

PMID: 16251488

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

69. Use of traditional medicine in Lao PDR.

Sydara K, Gneunphonsavath S, Wahlström R, Freudenthal S, Houamboun K, Tomson G, Falkenberg T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16150374

 

Source

Traditional Medicine Research Center, Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Laos.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Exploring the attitudes and knowledge of household members and health staff in Lao PDR regarding the use of traditional medicine.

BACKGROUND:

Along with modern medicine, traditional medicine utilisation is officially supported in Laos, being part of the cultural heritage and considered useful for this low-income country in relation to the problems with access to modern pharmaceuticals.

METHODS:

The study population comprised 600 households from one lowland (Pakse) and one mountainous (Paksong) district. In a stratified two-stage sampling procedure, household surveys were conducted and focus group discussions (FGD) were performed among health staff and villagers in the same districts.

RESULTS:

Seventy-seven per cent of the households stated the ever use of traditional medicine including herbal medicines, sauna, massage and acupuncture. The main reason given was perceived efficacy. Traditional medicine was used for both chronic and acute diseases. The FGD revealed the perceived need to have training courses for traditional medicine providers and to have a medicinal garden in the villages. Utilisation was similar in lowland and mountainous districts as well as in urban and rural areas.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study indicates that traditional medicine is widely used and perceived as effective by a fairly large proportion of Lao people. The findings may form a basis for health sector reforms that are congruent with perceived local needs, e.g. in establishing a strategic plan for the development of the traditional medicine sector in Lao PDR.

PMID: 16150374

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

70. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in the Scandinavian countries.

Hanssen B, Grimsgaard S, Launsø L, Fønnebø V, Falkenberg T, Rasmussen NK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16025876

 

Source

National Research Centre in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the prevalence of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Norway, Denmark and Stockholm County.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND SUBJECTS:

In Norway, a national representative sample of 1000 participants completed telephone interviews regarding their CAM use in 1997 (response rate 51). In Denmark, a national representative sample of 16 690 participants completed questionnaires and interviews regarding their health and morbidity in 2000 (response rate 74). In Stockholm County, a randomly selected sample of 1001 participants completed telephone interviews about their CAM use in 2000 (response rate 63).

RESULTS:

Prevalence of ever-use of CAM was 34% in Norway, 45% in Denmark, and 49% in Stockholm. Use of CAM is associated with poor self-reported health in all three studies, and with visits to a medical doctor in Denmark and Norway. More women than men, and more with higher education, reported use of CAM. Most frequently used CAM therapy was homeopathy in Norway, reflexology in Denmark, and massage in Stockholm County.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of CAM is common in the Scandinavian countries, and there are national differences regarding therapy preferences. Many individuals use both CAM and conventional health services.

PMID: 16025876

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

71. A century of CAM in New Zealand: a struggle for recognition.

Duke K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15984218

 

Source

New Zealand School of Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Graduate School of Nursing and Midwifery, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. kate.duke@vuw.ac.nz

Abstract

This paper highlights the emergence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within New Zealand. The historical path of development and acceptance of CAM from 1908 will be outlined, with reference to the development of current legislation and government policy. Emphasis will be placed on rapid changes occurring over the last decade. Acupuncture, osteopathy, chiropractics and therapeutic massage are presented as examples of CAM development and practice within New Zealand. Appendix A represents those modalities currently practiced in New Zealand.

PMID: 15984218

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

72. Attitudes of Australian pharmacists toward complementary and alternative medicines.

Naidu S, Wilkinson JM, Simpson MD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15972324

 

Source

School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by the general public has led to increasing interest in how health professionals view these therapies.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacists toward CAM.

METHODS:

An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was designed and mailed to 1500 randomly selected pharmacists in New South Wales, Australia.

RESULTS:

Four hundred eighty-four responses were received, with 77% of respondents indicating that they had personally used CAM and 60% correctly identifying that CAM was comprised of more than just botanicals and nutritional agents. The most commonly used CAMs were herbal and vitamin supplements (74%), which was significantly above use of the next most frequent CAM, massage therapy (6%). Most pharmacists (71%) reported offering CAM products for sale; however, 27% of these practices did not have access to CAM information for pharmacy staff or patients. Pharmacists generally viewed CAM positively and believed that they enhanced the customers' image of pharmacy (57%), increased customer numbers (87%), and could increase annual sales (72%). Ninety-one percent of respondents believed that it is necessary for pharmacists to have knowledge of both CAM and conventional medicine to be able to inform patients about their treatment options. Books and journal articles were their primary information sources, with the main reasons for recommending CAM evidence of efficacy and to maintain general health.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM use is prevalent among Australian pharmacists. While pharmacists are aware of their role as educators about both CAM and conventional medicines, there is a need for greater access to CAM resources and education on these therapies.

PMID: 15972324

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

73. Community pharmacists' actions when patients use complementary and alternative therapies with medications.

Brown CM, Barner JC, Shah S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15730116

 

Source

University of Texas at Austin, PHAR-Pharmacy Administration, Austin, TX 78712-0127, USA. cmbrown@mail.utexas.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess actions of community pharmacists in response to their patients' concurrent use of prescription medications and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

DESIGN:

Nonexperimental, cross-sectional mail survey.

SETTING:

Texas.

PARTICIPANTS:

107 community pharmacists.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pharmacists' self-reported rate of patient inquiry about CAM use and actions taken in response to CAM use.

RESULTS:

A majority (71.0%) of pharmacists had encountered patients who were using CAM, which was defined broadly in the survey to include herbal products, vitamins and minerals, homeopathic products, massage, meditation, and other types of CAM. Pharmacists documented CAM use by patients in 11.0% of cases and reported monitoring for drug-related problems in 38.4% of users. Among CAM users, pharmacists most often encouraged CAM use if medically appropriate. Pharmacists were not comfortable with responding to CAM inquiries but believed they needed adequate knowledge about CAM. In general, pharmacists rarely asked patients about their CAM use. Pharmacists' rate of inquiry about CAM use increased significantly when this information could be documented in patient profiles and when pharmacists had additional training in CAM. Also, in pharmacies that stocked herbal or homeopathic products, pharmacists were significantly more likely to encourage the use of CAM when medically appropriate and to recommend other CAM therapies appropriate for patients' conditions. When no references were available to research CAM, pharmacists tended to neither encourage nor discourage CAM use based on lack of scientific evidence of their effectiveness.

CONCLUSION:

Most community pharmacists had patients who used CAM, but they were not proactive in inquiring about or documenting this use. They most often encouraged CAM use if deemed medically appropriate. Pharmacists' actions differed on the basis of professional and practice setting characteristics. To ensure optimal drug therapy outcomes, pharmacists should be more proactive in identifying and documenting CAM use by patients.

PMID: 15730116

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

74. Use and acceptance of classical natural and alternative medicine in Germany--findings of a representative population-based survey].

[Article in German]

Härtel U, Volger E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15604623

 

Source

Europäisches Gesundheitszentrum für Naturheilverfahren, Sebastian Kneipp Institut GmbH, Bad Wörishofen, Deutschland. haertel@lrz.uni-muenchen.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of classical natural therapies and alternative medicine is becoming increasingly popular in Germany and other European countries. Only few population-based studies in Germany have investigated the use and acceptance of a variety of classical and alternative methods, including their possible determinants.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of men and women aged 18 to 69 years, applying a standardized self-administered questionnaire, that included questions on 21 different healing methods, on personal reasons for use, on individual attitudes to natural therapies, and on the socioeconomic background.

RESULTS:

Overall, 70% of women and 54% of men had used at least one classical natural or alternative healing method (including homeopathic and anthroposophic medicine) during the 12 months preceding the study. The most frequently used methods were classical therapies such as exercise therapy (32% of women, 26% of men), herbal medicine (33% of women, 20% of men), hydrotherapy (24% of women, 17% of men), and medical massage (22% of women, 15% of men). About 20% of women and 10% of men had applied homeopathic therapies, and about 9% (11% women, 6% men) had used acupuncture. In multivariate logistic regression analyses gender and education were the best predictors of classical and alternative medicine use. Women and persons with at least high-school education used these methods significantly more often than men and persons with lower education. Age-stratified analyses revealed that the age-group of the 40-49-year-old people used classical and alternative methods significantly more often than younger or older age-groups. The most frequently reported health problems for which natural therapies had been applied were back pain (57%), cold (29%), headaches (19%), strain (15%) and gastrointestinal ailments (12%). Overall, the efficacy and usefulness of natural healing methods was evaluated positive by the majority of the study population. 58% would appreciate it if physicians would more often prescribe such therapies, and 48% would like to have more information about the benefit of natural healing methods.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of use of natural medicine varies substantially across different types of healing methods. The observed overall acceptance together with the marked need for more information should be used more intensively for the development of health promotion strategies and underpins the necessity of reinforced research activities in this field.

PMID: 15604623

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

75. Determinants of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) use.

Al-Windi A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15561519

 

Source

Family Medicine Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels allé 12, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden. ahmad.al-windi@slpo.sll.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) and identify the determinants of CAM use in a multi-ethnic Swedish primary health care practice population.

METHODS:

A questionnaire was handed out to 1433 patients aged 16 years and above who visited the Jordbro Health Centre (JHC) in Stockholm, Sweden, between 14 January and 30 June 2002. The results were linked to computerised medical records.

RESULTS:

Seventeen percent of respondents had consulted a CAM provider during the preceding year and many patients had consulted several types of CAM providers. The most frequently CAM used was massage, followed by acupuncture, chiropractic and naprapathy. In the logistic regression, when adjusting for the influence of possible confounders, chronic disease and physical activity were the most important predictors of consultations with CAM providers. Users of CAM had had a higher number of consultations with medical professionals than had non-users of alternative medicine.

CONCLUSIONS:

In our study population CAM, defined here as "manual therapy", was used in addition to traditional therapies and was related to high use of health care services. Chronic disease and physical activity were significantly and independently related to use of CAM.

PMID: 15561519

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

76. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among United States adults: the influences of personality, coping strategies, and social support.

Honda K, Jacobson JS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15530580

 

Source

Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. kh2086@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although patterns of utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the community have begun to be described, few studies have addressed the relationships between dispositional psychological factors and the use of CAM. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between CAM use and personality, coping strategies, and perceived social support in a representative sample of adults in the United States.

METHODS:

Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States Survey (MIDUS), a representative sample of 3,032 adults aged 25-74 in the US population. We analyzed use of acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic, energy healing, exercise/movement therapy, herbal medicine, high-dose megavitamins, homeopathy, hypnosis, imagery techniques, massage, prayer/spiritual practice, relaxation/mediation, and special diet within the last year. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of personality, dispositional coping strategies (primary and secondary control), and perceived social support and strain with CAM use, controlling for sociodemographic factors, medical care access, and physical and mental disorders.

RESULTS:

Openness was positively associated with the use of all types of CAM except manipulative body-based methods. Extroversion was inversely correlated with the use of mind-body therapies. Primary control was inversely and secondary control directly correlated with the use of CAM. Perceived friend support was positively associated with the use of mind-body therapies, manipulative body-based methods, and alternative medical systems. Perceived partner strain was positively associated with the use of biologically based therapies, and family strain increased the odds of manipulative body-based methods.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study is the first to document a significant association between specific domains of personality, coping strategies, and social support, and the use of CAM among adults in the general population. Understanding the relationships between psychological factors and CAM use may help researchers and health care providers to address patients' needs more effectively and to achieve better adherence to treatment recommendations.

PMID: 15530580

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

77. Adolescent use of complementary therapies.

Braun CA, Bearinger LH, Halcón LL, Pettingell SL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15963913

 

Source

Nursing Department, College of St. Benedict/St. John's University, St. Joseph, Minnesota 56374, USA. cbraun@csbsju.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Interest in alternative/complementary therapies (A/CTs) is on the rise, yet little is known about adolescents' use of A/CTs. The study purpose was to examine A/CT utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey of 401 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, was conducted in one Midwest urban adolescent ambulatory clinic in 2002.

RESULTS:

Overall, 68.1% of the adolescents reported using one or more A/CT; most commonly, herbal medicines (27.2%), massage therapy (26.7%), and megavitamins (21.7%). Use by friends and family was the primary influence for adolescent A/CT use; lack of familiarity was the greatest reason for nonuse (53.9%). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3%) was the most common desired health outcome. Few adolescents (13.8%) disclosed A/CT use to their health care providers. Insurance coverage was provided for 10.2% of the therapies and out-of-pocket costs averaged 67 dollars/month. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate analyses. Of these, only associations between A/CT use and race/ethnicity and health responsibility remained statistically significant after adjusting for the other variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents, yet very few disclosed their use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to gain a more complete understanding of health practices among adolescents in clinical settings. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use.

PMID: 15963913

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

78. Complementary and alternative medicine use among adults: United States, 2002.

Barnes PM, Powell-Griner E, McFann K, Nahin RL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15188733

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This report presents selected estimates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among U.S. adults, using data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

METHODS:

Data for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population were collected using computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). This report is based on 31,044 interviews of adults age 18 years and over. Statistics shown in this report were age adjusted to the year 2000 U.S. standard population.

RESULTS:

Sixty-two percent of adults used some form of CAM therapy during the past 12 months when the definition of CAM therapy included prayer specifically for health reasons. When prayer specifically for health reasons was excluded from the definition, 36% of adults used some form of CAM therapy during the past 12 months. The 10 most commonly used CAM therapies during the past 12 months were use of prayer specifically for one's own health (43.0%), prayer by others for one's own health (24.4%), natural products (18.9%), deep breathing exercises (11.6%), participation in prayer group for one's own health (9.6%), meditation (7.6%), chiropractic care (7.5%), yoga (5.1%), massage (5.0%), and diet-based therapies (3.5%). Use of CAM varies by sex, race, geographic region, health insurance status, use of cigarettes or alcohol, and hospitalization. CAM was most often used to treat back pain or back problems, head or chest colds, neck pain or neck problems, joint pain or stiffness, and anxiety or depression. Adults age 18 years or over who used CAM were more likely to do so because they believed that CAM combined with conventional medical treatments would help (54.9%) and/or they thought it would be interesting to try (50.1%). Most adults who have ever used CAM have used it within the past 12 months, although there is variation by CAM therapy.

PMID: 15188733

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

79. Use of complementary and alternative therapies among active duty soldiers, military retirees, and family members at a military hospital.

McPherson F, Schwenka MA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15185998

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Madigan Army Medical Center, Ft. Lewis, WA 98431, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To survey soldiers, retirees, and spouses about their use and interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies.

METHODS:

We used an anonymous, self-administered survey.

RESULTS:

Of 291 completed surveys, 81% used one or more CAM therapy. The most commonly used were massage and herbal/food supplements. The most common reasons were pain, stress, and anxiety. In addition, 69% wanted CAM therapies offered at the medical treatment facility (MTF), whereas 24% would pay for the services, and 44% were undecided.

CONCLUSION:

A high percentage of soldiers, retirees, and dependents are using CAM therapies and most would prefer that they be made available at the MTF. The implications of such high CAM usage within the military suggests a need for nurses and providers to become educated in CAM therapies to better assist patients in making appropriate choices between two very different forms of medical treatment options and for consideration to provide these services within the MTF.

PMID: 15185998

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

80. A survey of patients' out-of-pocket payments for complementary and alternative medicine therapies.

Bridevaux IP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15130572

 

Source

HSR&D VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA. ipb@u.washington.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Investigate the out-of-pocket payments for complementary and alternative therapies.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study using the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey.

SETTING:

Fourteen thousand and twenty-six US adults aged > or =25 years from 10,597 answering households. Respondents to the survey were only included in this analysis if they used a single CAM therapy which was not covered by insurance.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Reported out-of-pocket payments.

RESULTS:

Out of 836 users of alternative therapies, 577 used only a single therapy. Massage therapy (23.7%), spiritual healing (16.6%) and herbal therapy (14.7%) were the most frequently single used therapies. The out-of-pocket payments per visit for providers was on average $49 for nutritional advice, $44 for acupuncture, $33 for massage, $23 for herbal therapies, and $9 for spiritual healing.

CONCLUSIONS:

These are the first estimates of the out-of-pocket payments for specific complementary and alternative therapies. They can help understand the importance people place on these therapies.

PMID: 15130572

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

81. Complementary and alternative therapy use by older adults in three ethnically diverse populations: a pilot study.

King MO, Pettigrew AC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14976501

 

Source

Department of Nursing at Xavier University, College of Social Sciences in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

Americans have overwhelmingly embraced complementary and alternative therapies. Although the primary purpose of this study was to refine a questionnaire on complementary and alternative therapy use by older adults, the findings of this pilot study identified knowledge and use of complementary and alternative therapies in a convenience sample of 60 older adults, 54 to 92 years of age from three ethnically diverse senior centers. Eighty percent of the participants used two or more therapies. There were no significant differences in therapy use by ethnicity. The most commonly used therapies were prayer, vitamins, diet, massage, and meditation. The participants rated the effectiveness of therapies higher than their knowledge of the therapies. Older adults need accurate information from health care providers to make safe decisions regarding the combination of complementary therapies and prescribed treatments to reduce the risk of interaction.

PMID: 14976501

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

82. Use of complementary and alternative therapies: a national multicentre study of oncology health professionals in Norway.

Kolstad A, Risberg T, Bremnes Y, Wilsgaard T, Holte H, Klepp O, Mella O, Wist E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14767750

 

Source

Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0310, Oslo, Norway. arnkolst@online.no

Abstract

GOALS OF WORK:

It is well documented that an increasing proportion of cancer patients today use complementary and alternative medicine, mostly alongside conventional therapies. This study investigates the use of complementary and alternative medicine among oncology health workers and the reported effects.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In June 2002, we conducted a national multicentre survey including 828 Norwegian oncologists, nurses, clerks and therapeutic radiographers. The response rate was 61.5%.

MAIN RESULTS:

We found that females were more often users of both complementary and alternative methods than males (39% versus 15% and 47% versus 17%) and that few oncologists had tried such treatments compared to nurses, therapeutic radiographers and clerks (20/12% versus 50/40%, 41/33%,and 31/50%). Interestingly, the majority of those who had tried unconventional methods reported some or very good effects. Acupuncture, homeopathy, aromatherapy and massage were the most popular therapies. Sub-group analyses including only oncologists showed that female physicians were more often users of both complementary and alternative methods compared to males (33% versus 12%, 25% versus 3%). Moreover, participants below the age of 35 years and Christians more often reported use.

CONCLUSIONS:

This survey demonstrates that significant proportion of oncology health workers in Norway have used non-proven therapies and that most have had a positive experience. Differences in use is highly dependent on gender, profession, age and religion.

PMID: 14767750

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

83. Personal use of complementary and alternative therapies by critical care nurses.

Lindquist R, Tracy MF, Savik K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12943147

 

Source

University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 6-101 WDH 308 Harvard Street SE Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. lindq002@umn.edu

Abstract

Critical care settings are stressful to nurses, and exposure over time may contribute to stress-related symptoms and illnesses. Nurses' personal use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) may lessen the effects of stress and contribute to their overall well-being and health maintenance. A national survey of critical care nurses who are members of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses revealed that a majority (96.4%) of critical care nurse respondents were using one or more CAT for personal use or had consulted a provider for CAT therapy. The most common therapies used were exercise, diet, massage, and prayer (or spiritual direction). Nurses' personal use of CAT was related to having knowledge of more types of CAT, use of more CAT in practice, a perception of benefits of greater numbers of CAT, more openness to use, more types of CAT recommended to patients, and a perception of more barriers to use in their institutional setting. Data support our model that links nurses' personal use to use in practice. Educational programs to promote nurses' knowledge and personal use of CAT could lead to an increase in appropriate use of CAT in professional practice and potential benefits to critical care patients and their families.

PMID: 12943147

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]