1. Correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in Chicago area children with diabetes (DM).

Miller JL, Cao D, Miller JG, Lipton RB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19615956

 

Source

University of Chicago, Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Chicago, IL 60613-2521, USA. jlrobbin@yahoo.com

Abstract

AIMS:

To correlate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children with diabetes mellitus (DM) with DM control and other family or disease characteristics.

METHODS:

Parents/guardians of children with DM were interviewed about demographics, clinical characteristics, CAM use, health care beliefs, psychosocial variables, and religious beliefs. The child's hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) value from the visit was collected. Statistical analyses included chi(2), Fisher's exact test, and 2-sample t-tests.

RESULTS:

106 families with type 1 DM were interviewed. 33% of children tried CAM in the last year; 75% of parents had ever tried CAM. Children most commonly tried faith healing or prayer; parents most commonly tried faith healing or prayer, chiropractic, massage, and herbal teas. Children were more likely to have used CAM if their parents or siblings used CAM or their family was more religious. They were more likely to have discussed CAM with their providers if they used CAM. Parents of child CAM users reported more problems with DM treatment adherence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with DM used CAM. There were no differences in DM control, demographics, healthcare beliefs, stress, or quality of life between CAM users and non-users. Practitioners should inquire about CAM use to improve DM care for children.

PMID:

19615956

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. National patterns and correlates of complementary and alternative medicine use in adults with diabetes.

Garrow D, Egede LE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17109581

 

Source

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Center for Health Disparities Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to determine national patterns and correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among adults with diabetes.

METHODS:

The authors compared CAM use in 2474 adults with and 28,625 adults without diabetes who participated in the most comprehensive national survey on CAM use (2002 National Health Interview Survey). Eight CAM use categories were created, including dietary, herbal, chiropractic, yoga, relaxation, vitamin, prayer, and other (acupuncture, Ayurveda, biofeedback, chelation, energy healing or Reiki therapy, hypnosis, massage, naturopathy, and homeopathy). An overall CAM use category also was created that excluded vitamins and prayer. Patterns of use were compared with chi-square and independent correlates of CAM use with multiple logistic regression controlling for relevant covariates. STATA was used for analysis to account for the complex survey design.

RESULTS:

Prevalence of overall use of CAM did not differ significantly by diabetes status (47.6 versus 47.9%, p = 0.81). Diabetes was not an independent predictor of overall use of CAM (OR 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83, 1.05). However, persons with diabetes were more likely to use prayer (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.05, 1.36), but less likely to use herbs (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75, 0.99), yoga (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.43, 0.72), or vitamins (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72, 0.93) than people without diabetes after controlling for relevant covariates. Independent correlates of overall use of CAM differed by age, income, employment, comorbidity, and health status between people with and without diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found that there has been a dramatic increase in overall use of CAM in adults with diabetes; diabetes was not an independent predictor of overall use of CAM; and people with diabetes were more likely to use prayer, but less likely to use herbs, yoga, or vitamins compared to persons without diabetes.

PMID: 17109581

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

3. The role of complementary and alternative medicine in diabetes.

Dham S, Shah V, Hirsch S, Banerji MA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16898580

 

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) describes a diverse group of medical and health care systems, practices, and products not currently considered to be part of conventional medicine. Inadequacies in current treatments for diabetes have led 2 to 3.6 million Americans to use CAM for diabetes treatment, despite limited studies of safety and efficacy of CAM methods. CAM is used mostly by West Indians, Africans, Indians, Latin Americans, or Asians. Prayer, acupuncture, massage, hot tub therapy, biofeedback, and yoga have been used as well as various plant remedies for treating diabetes. Several CAM practices and herbal remedies are promising for diabetes treatment, but further rigorous study is needed in order to establish safety, efficacy, and mechanism of action. In the meantime, it is important to be aware that many patients with diabetes may be using CAM and to consider potential interactions with conventional medicines being used.

PMID: 16898580

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Association between complementary and alternative medicine use, preventive care practices, and use of conventional medical services among adults with diabetes.

Garrow D, Egede LE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16373889

 

Source

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Cannon St., Suite 403, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the association between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, preventive care practices, and use of conventional medical services among adults with diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

We analyzed data on 2,474 adults with diabetes. We created an overall CAM-use category based on use of any of the following: diets, herbs, chiropractic care, yoga, relaxation, acupuncture, ayuverda, biofeedback, chelation, energy healing, Reiki therapy, hypnosis, massage, naturopathy, and homeopathy. We used multiple logistic regression to assess the effect of CAM use on preventive care practices (receipt of influenza and pneumonia vaccines) and use of conventional medical services (number of primary care and emergency department visits). STATA was used for statistical analysis to account for the complex survey design.

RESULTS:

A total of 48% of adults with diabetes used some form of CAM. CAM use was independently associated with receipt of pneumonia vaccination (odds ratio 1.56 [95% CI 1.26-1.94]) but not significantly associated with receipt of influenza vaccination (1.17 [0.92-1.48]). CAM use was independently associated with visiting the emergency department (1.34 [1.06-1.70]), having six or more primary care visits (1.44 [1.14-1.83]), and having eight or more primary care visits (1.66 [1.22-2.25]).

CONCLUSIONS:

In contrast to the findings of previous studies, CAM use appears to be associated with increased likelihood of receipt of preventive care services and increased emergency department and primary care visits. CAM use may not be a barrier to use of conventional medical services in adults with diabetes.

PMID: 16373889

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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