1. A pilot study exploring the effects of reflexology on cold intolerance.

Zhang W, Takahashi S, Miki T, Fujieda H, Ishida T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20633515

 

Source

Department of Acupuncture, Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Mie, Japan.

Abstract

Cold intolerance is an inability to tolerate cold temperatures and is accompanied by symptoms including headache, shoulder discomfort, dizziness and palpitations. The current study was performed to examine whether reflexology therapy affected cold intolerance in human subjects and whether the treatment was systemically effective. Ten female volunteer examinees with subjective feelings of cold were examined. After a 5-minute foot bath, 10 minutes of reflexology therapy was performed on their left foot. Skin temperature and blood flow were estimated before and after treatment, together with an interview concerning their feelings of cold and daily habits. In addition, how the recovery rate was affected by the application of a chilled-water load was also estimated. Along with significant increases in skin temperature and blood flow compared with pre-treatment at the bilateral points of KI-1, LR-3, and BL-60, a faster recovery after the application of the chilled-water load was also seen in the lower limbs on both sides. From these results, we conclude that reflexology has systemic effects and is an alternative method for treating cold intolerance.

Copyright (c) 2010 Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by .. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20633515

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Reasons, perceived efficacy, and factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine use among Malaysian patients with HIV/AIDS.

Hasan SS, See CK, Choong CL, Ahmed SI, Ahmadi K, Anwar M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20973734

 

Source

Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. shahzad_hasan@imu.edu.my

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of use, reasons for use, and perceived effect of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), accompanied by identification and comparison of the factors that are potentially associated with CAM use.

DESIGN:

This cross-sectional study was carried out in 325 randomly sampled patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), at HIV/AIDS referral clinics in the Hospital Sungai Buloh, Malaysia. Simple random sampling was used, where randomization was done using patients' medical record numbers.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Semistructured face-to-face interviews were conducted using 38 questions pertaining to type, pattern, perceived efficacy, adverse effects, and influential factors associated with CAM use. In addition, CD4 count and viral load readings were recorded.

RESULTS:

Of 325 randomly sampled patients with HIV/AIDS, 254 of them were using some forms of CAM, resulting in a utilization rate of 78.2%. Vitamins and supplements (52.6%), herbal products (33.8%), and massage (16.6%) were the top three most frequently used CAM modalities. Sociodemographic factors including education level (p = 0.021, r(s) = 0.148), monthly income (p = 0.001, r(s) = 0.260), and family history of CAM use (p = 0.001, r(s) = 0.231) were significantly associated and positively correlated with CAM use. However, the majority of these patients (68%) did not disclose CAM use to health care professionals. About half of those who rated their health as good or very good perceived it as a result of CAM use.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study confirmed the range of 30%-100% CAM use among individuals infected with HIV/AIDS. Although, on the one hand some types of CAM reduced viral load and enhanced the immune system, on the other hand some forms of CAM produced a detrimental effect on the virological suppression, opening this platform to more research and investigation in order to optimize the use of CAM among patients with HIV/AIDS.

PMID: 20973734

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Traditional complementary and alternative medicine and antiretroviral treatment adherence among HIV patients in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

Peltzer K, Friend-du Preez N, Ramlagan S, Fomundam H, Anderson J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21304624

 

Source

Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa. KPeltzer@hrsc.ac.za

Abstract

Adherence to antiretroviral medication in the treatment of HIV is critical, both to maximize efficacy and to minimize the emergence of drug resistance. The aim of this prospective study in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM) by HIV patients and its effect on antiretroviral (ARV) adherence 6 months after initiating ARVs. 735 (29.8% male and 70.2% female) patients who consecutively attended three HIV clinics completed assessments prior to ARV initiation and 519 after six months on antiretroviral therapy (ART) Results indicate that the use of herbal therapies for HIV declined significantly from 36.6% prior to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation to 7.9% after being on ARVs for 6 months. Faith healing methods, including spiritual practices and prayer for HIV declined from 35.8% to 22.1% and physical/body-mind therapy (exercise and massage) declined from 5.0% to 1.9%. In contrast, the use of micronutrients (vitamins, etc.) significantly increased from 42.6% to 87.4%. In multivariate regression analyses, ARV non-adherence (dose, schedule and food) was associated with the use of herbal treatment, not taking micronutrients and the use of over-the-counter drugs. The use of TCAM declined after initiating ARVs. As herbal treatment for HIV was associated with reduced ARV adherence, patients' use of TCAM should be considered in ARV adherence management.

PMID: 21304624

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC3021154

Free PMC Article

 

4. Symptom management and self-care for peripheral neuropathy in HIV/AIDS.

Nicholas PK, Kemppainen JK, Canaval GE, Corless IB, Sefcik EF, Nokes KM, Bain CA, Kirksey KM, Eller LS, Dole PJ, Hamilton MJ, Coleman CL, Holzemer WL, Reynolds NR, Portillo CJ, Bunch EH, Wantland DJ, Voss J, Phillips R, Tsai YF, Mendez MR, Lindgren TG, Davis SM, Gallagher DM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17364396

 

Source

Brigham and Women's Hospital, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA. pnicholas@mghihp.edu

Abstract

Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological complication in HIV and is often associated with antiretroviral therapy. As part of a larger study on self-care for symptoms in HIV disease, this study analyzed the prevalence and characteristics of peripheral neuropathy in HIV disease, sociodemographic and disease-related correlates and self-care strategies. A convenience sample of 1,217 respondents was recruited from data collection sites in several US cities, Puerto Rico, Colombia and Taiwan. Results of the study indicated that respondents with peripheral neuropathy (n=450) identified 20 self-care behaviors including complementary therapies, use of medications, exercise and rest and/or elevation of extremities. Ratings of frequency and effectiveness were also included. An activities checklist summarized into five categories of self-care behaviors including activities/thoughts, exercise, medications, complementary therapies and substance was used to determine self-care behaviors. Taking a hot bath was the most frequent strategy used by those with peripheral neuropathy (n=292) and received the highest overall rating of effectiveness of any self-management strategies included in this study at 8.1 (scale 1-10). Other self-care strategies to manage this symptom included: staying off the feet (n=258), rubbing the feet with cream (n=177), elevating the feet (n=236), walking (n=262), prescribed anti-epileptic agent (n=80), prescribed analgesics (n=84), over-the-counter medications (n=123), vitamin B (n=122), calcium supplements (n=72), magnesium (n=48), massage (n=156), acupuncture (n=43), reflexology (n=23) and meditation (n=80). Several behaviors that are often deemed unhealthy were included among the strategies reported to alleviate peripheral neuropathy including use of marijuana (n=67), cigarette smoking (n=139), drinking alcohol (n=81) and street drugs (n=30).

PMID: 17364396

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Complementary and alternative medicine use in British Columbia--a survey of HIV positive people on antiretroviral therapy.

Dhalla S, Chan KJ, Montaner JS, Hogg RS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17030295

 

Source

Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. shayestadhalla@yahoo.com

Abstract

In 2002, the British Columbia (BC) Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS collected final detailed data on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in their HIV treatment program. This cross-sectional study of 682 participants examines types and determinants of CAM use in this program, and examines adverse effects associated with CAM use and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Among the 47% ever CAM users in the included population, vitamins/minerals (81%), meditation/yoga (36%), massage (31%), marijuana (30%), dietary supplements (24%), and herbal medicines (19%), were most commonly used. Multivariate analysis indicated CAM users were less likely to have low education (AOR=0.51), more likely to be unemployed (AOR=1.52), more likely to have been on ART longer (AOR=1.19), and more likely to experience objective, action-requiring (OA) side effects (AOR=1.45). CAM use is common. Both patients and health professionals should be aware of potential toxicities and drug interactions related to the use of CAM and HIV/AIDS treatment.

PMID: 17030295

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. The psychological effects of aromatherapy-massage in healthy postpartum mothers.

Imura M, Misao H, Ushijima H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16504900

 

Source

Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongoh, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

Abstract

This study examined the effect of aromatherapy-massage in healthy postpartum mothers. A quasi-experimental between-groups design was used. Mothers who received aromatherapy-massage were compared with a control group who received standard postpartum care. Thirty-six healthy, first-time mothers with vaginal delivery of a full-term, healthy infant participated in this study. Sixteen mothers received a 30-minute aromatherapy-massage on the second postpartum day; 20 mothers were in the control group. All mothers completed the following four standardized questionnaires before and after the intervention: 1) Maternity Blues Scale; 2) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; 3) Profile of Mood States (POMS); and 4) Feeling toward Baby Scale. In the aromatherapy-massage group, posttreatment scores significantly decreased for the Maternity Blues Scale, the State-Anxiety Inventory, and all but one of the Profile of Mood States subscales. Posttreatment scores in the intervention group significantly increased in Profile of Mood States-Vigor subscale and the Approach Feeling toward Baby subscale. Scores in the intervention group significantly decreased in Conflict Index of Avoidance/Approach Feeling toward Baby subscale. Our results suggest that aromatherapy-massage might be an effective intervention for postpartum mothers to improve physical and mental status and to facilitate mother-infant interaction.

PMID: 16504900

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. Complementary therapies for the treatment of HIV: in search of the evidence.

Mills E, Wu P, Ernst E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15969772

 

Source

Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, HSC-2C12, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada. millsej@mcmaster.ca

Abstract

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread. Yet, little is known about the evidence supporting its use in HIV/AIDS. We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of complementary therapies for HIV and HIV-related symptoms. Comprehensive literature searches were performed of seven electronic databases. Data were abstracted independently by two reviewers. Thirty trials met our predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria: 18 trials were of stress management; five of Natural Health Products; four of massage/therapeutic touch; one of acupuncture; two of homeopathy. The trials were published between 1989 and 2003. Most trials were small and of limited methodological rigour. The results suggest that stress management may prove to be an effective way to increase the quality of life. For all other treatments, data are insufficient for demonstrating effectiveness. Despite the widespread use of CAM by people living with HIV/AIDS, the effectiveness of these therapies has not been established. Vis à vis CAM's popularity, the paucity of clinical trials and their low methodological quality are concerning.

PMID: 15969772

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Depression in HIV-infected patients: allopathic, complementary, and alternative treatments.

Fulk LJ, Kane BE, Phillips KD, Bopp CM, Hand GA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15518668

 

Source

Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, 1300 Wheat Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this review article is to synthesize the current knowledge related to depression and HIV disease.

METHODS:

The research literature was critically evaluated for several selected therapies that are prescribed for HIV-infected persons to treat depression. These therapies included pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, alternative, and complementary therapies.

RESULTS:

Several therapies are currently available for the treatment of depression in HIV disease. When prescribing treatments, clinicians should be aware of problems associated with diagnoses, drug-drug interactions, and the benefits of some of the new therapies that are now available. Treatment regimes should be carefully designed to meet the individual needs of the patient and will optimally include a combination of approaches including psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, education, and/or complementary therapies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although HIV is now a treatable disease, the prevalence of depression in the HIV population remains high and should be continually addressed.

PMID: 15518668

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]