1. Complementary and alternative medicine and supportive care at leading cancer centers: a systematic analysis of websites.

Brauer JA, El Sehamy A, Metz JM, Mao JJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20180691

 

Source

Department of Medicine, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

With increasing frequency, patients with cancer and their family members are turning to the Internet to educate themselves about their disease and treatment options, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and supportive care. However, very little is known about how national leading cancer centers represent these therapies via their websites.

METHODS:

Simulating the perspective of an information-seeking patient or family member, we performed a systematic analysis of the websites of 41 National Cancer Institute designated comprehensive cancer centers. Two researchers independently evaluated websites, recorded CAM information, and rated quality of the websites using a 4-item Likert scale (overall, information, presentation, and navigation) with Cronbach's alpha = 0.97. Rating was adequately correlated between the two raters (correlation coefficient 0.8).

RESULTS:

Of 41 centers, 12 (29%) did not have functional websites with regard to information related to CAM. The most common CAM approaches mentioned were: acupuncture (59%), meditation/nutrition/spiritual support/yoga (56% for each), massage therapy (54%), and music therapy (51%). Twenty-three (23; 56%) presented information on support groups, 19 (46%) on patient seminars, 18 (44%) on survivorship effort, and 17 (41%) on symptom management clinics. Twenty-nine (29) (71%) of these websites had a telephone number available, 22 (54%) mentioned at least one ongoing research opportunity, and 19 (46%) provided links to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine website. Median rating of the quality of websites was 50 of 100, with only 7 (17%) of centers receiving a composite score 80 (excellent) or better.

CONCLUSIONS:

While a growing number of leading cancer centers provide information about CAM and supportive oncology information for patients via their websites, the quality and ease of navigation of these sites remain highly variable. Effective development and redesign of many of the websites is needed to better inform and empower patients and families seeking CAM and supportive care information.

PMID: 20180691

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Complementary therapies in palliative cancer care.

[Article in Turkish]

Yildirim YK, Fadiloğlu C, Uyar M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16783665

 

Source

EgeUniversityNursingSchool, Department of Internal Medicine Nursing,Izmir,Turkey. yasemin.kyildirim@ege.edu.tr

Abstract

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has grown in popularity both among the general population and among the cancer patients. Cancer patients often use CAM, which is a treatment that is not commonly used in the conventional setting. However, the prevalence of CAM use appears to vary substantially, with reported frequency of use of at least one CAMtherapy ranging from 20% to 83.3%. Complementary medicine has become an important aspect of palliative cancer care. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, homeopathy, hypnotherapy, massage, reflexology, relaxation techniques, and spiritual healing are frequently used forms of treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide information about some complementary therapies that are commonly used by cancer patients in the palliative care.

PMID: 16783665

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Proportion of gynecologic cancer patients using complementary and alternative medicine.

Supoken A, Chaisrisawatsuk T, Chumworathayi B.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20104968

 

Source

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Khon Kaen University, Thailand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of cancer and for supportive care of cancer patients must be clearly separated. There is encouraging evidence for CAM in the latter area, such as acupuncture and progressive muscle relaxation for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, and aromatherapy for decreasing anxiety and increasing quality of life. However, there are limited data about CAM used by gynecologic cancer patients, especially in Thai women. Therefore, the authors aimed to investigate the proportion and types of CAM using in our gynecologic cancer patients.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional survey was conducted between October to December, 2008. Totals of 50 admitted and 50 walk-in gynecologic cancer patients 1 month after diagnosis, aged more than 20 years and able to give informed consent, were selected for one-by-one interview by random walking survey.

RESULTS:

Among the 100 interviewed patients, aged 21-69 (mean=50.12), there were 46 cases of cervical cancers, 35 of ovarian cancers, 18 of endometrial cancers (two of these also had ovarian cancers), 2 of malignant gestational trophoblastic diseases, 1 of vulvar cancer, and 1 liver cancer (in a patient with ovarian cancer). Some 67% (95% CI, 57.8-76.2%) of them used CAM. As diet modifications, 11 used Chinese vegetarian, 8 common vegetarian, 5 Cheewajit, and 1 macrobiotics. Five of them used dietary supplements while colonic detoxification was emplyed in three. As herbal medicines, 27 used Thai herbs, 4 Chinese herbs, and 1 a herbal sauna. Twelve were receiving Thai massage. As exercises, 23 used aerobics and 5 stretching. Interestingly, 62 of them used Buddhist praying while only 3 employed native magic.

CONCLUSIONS:

The three most common forms of CAM used by our gynecologic cancer patients were Buddhist praying (62/67, 92.5%), followed by herbal medicines (27/67, 40.3%) and exercises (25/67, 37.3%).

PMID: 20104968

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Complementary and alternative medicine use among long-term lymphoma survivors: a pilot study.

Habermann TM, Thompson CA, LaPlant BR, Bauer BA, Janney CA, Clark MM, Rummans TA, Maurer MJ, Sloan JA, Geyer SM, Cerhan JR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19894247

 

Source

Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

No published survey has specifically addressed the beliefs, knowledge, and usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in long-term (5-20 years) lymphoma survivors alone. In this pilot project, 95 subjects were randomly selected from a population of 2,475 long-term lymphoma survivors and mailed a questionnaire. The median time from lymphoma diagnosis to completion of the questionnaire was 11 years (range 6-20). Overall, 68% (95% CI: 54-80%) of the long-term lymphoma survivors reported that they have used CAM, a rate higher than the estimated usage rate reported for the general population The most commonly used modalities were chiropractic (39%, 95% CI: 27-53%) and massage therapy (21%, 95% CI: 12-34%). Less than 10% used meditation (5%, 95% CI: 1-15%) and relaxation (7%, 95% CI: 2-17%). In terms of common herbal usage, 5% (95% CI: 1-15%) had used St. John's Wort and 7% (95% CI: 2-17%) had used shark cartilage. Although none of the patients reported that CAM usage was directed specifically towards treating their lymphoma, 4% (95% CI: 0-12%) of patients reported that CAM could cure cancer, and 14% (95% CI: 6-26%) reported that CAM could increase their feeling of control over their health. This pilot study suggests that long-term lymphoma survivors appear to use CAM at a rate higher than the general population. The use of potential agents of risk by the survivors and the lack of access to potentially beneficial modalities highlights the need for further study of CAM in this population.

(c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Comment in

PMID: 19894247

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Integrative Tumor Board: a case report and discussion from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Lu W, Ott MJ, Kennedy S, Mathay MB, Doherty-Gilman AM, Dean-Clower E, Hayes CM, Rosenthal DS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19815593

 

Source

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

A 34-year-old woman carrying a BRCA1 gene and a significant family history was diagnosed with T1c, N1 breast cancer. The tumor was estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER-2/Neu negative. The patient received dose-dense chemotherapy with Adriamycin and Cytoxan followed by Taxol, and left breast irradiation. Later, a bilateral S-GAP flap reconstruction with right prophylactic mastectomy and left mastectomy were performed. During her treatment, the patient had an integrative medicine consultation and was seen by a team of health care providers specializing in integrative therapies, including integrative nutrition, therapeutic massage, acupuncture, and yoga. Each modality contributed unique benefit in her care that led to a satisfactory outcome for the patient. A detailed discussion regarding her care from each modality is presented. The case elucidates the need for integrative approaches for cancer patients in a conventional medical setting.

PMID: 19815593

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2831080

 

6. Is there a role for complementary therapy in the management of leukemia?

Wesa KM, Cassileth BR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19761428

 

Source

Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1429 First Avenue, NY 10021, USA. wesak@mskcc.org

Abstract

Patients with leukemia often seek additional treatments not prescribed by their oncologist in an effort to improve their cancer treatment outcome or to manage symptoms. Complementary therapies are used in conjunction with traditional cancer treatments to decrease symptoms and side effects associated with cancer or cancer treatment, and to improve patients' overall quality of life. Complementary therapies are distinct from so-called 'alternative' therapies, which are unproven, ineffective and may postpone or interfere with mainstream cancer treatment. Complementary therapies are pleasant, inexpensive, nonpharmacologic and effective. For patients with leukemia, the complementary therapies that are always appropriate include mind-body interventions, such as self-hypnosis, meditation, guided imagery and breath awareness. Massage and reflexology (foot massage) decrease symptoms with effects lasting at least 2 days following treatment. Acupuncture is very beneficial for symptom management without adverse consequences. Physical fitness with regular exercise and healthy dietary habits can significantly decrease side effects of cancer treatments and may prolong survival. Botanical extracts and vitamin supplements may interfere with active cancer treatments, and should be discussed with the oncologist or pharmacist before use.

PMID: 19761428

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2792198

 

7. Aqua lymphatic therapy in women who suffer from breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema: a randomized controlled study.

Tidhar D, Katz-Leurer M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19495810

 

 

Source

Department of Physical Therapy, "Maccabi Healthcare Services", Netivot, Israel.

Erratum in

  • Support Care Cancer. 2010 Mar;18(3):393.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lymphedema is an adverse effect of breast cancer surgery. Aqua lymphatic therapy (ALT) is a novel treatment for limb volume reduction.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine whether ALT is a safe method and whether there are differences in adherence, limb volume, and quality of life between women who perform only self-management treatment and women who participate as well in ALT.

DESIGN:

Design of the study was single-blind randomized clinical trial.

SETTING:

The setting was in a hydrotherapy pool, 1.2 m depth, and a temperature of 32-33 degrees capital ES, Cyrillic.

PATIENTS:

Forty-eight women (56 +/- 10 years), with a 12.8% lymphedema relative volume, participated in the study.

INTERVENTION:

The control group was instructed to perform the self-management treatment. The study group joined a weekly session of ALT for 3 months in addition to the self-management therapy.

MEASUREMENTS:

Adherence was assessed by a self-reported diary, limb volume by a water displacement device, quality of life by the Upper Limb Lymphedema Questionnaire (ULL27), prior to, and after the intervention period.

RESULTS:

There was no episode of arm infection or aggravation in limb volume during the study period. ALT had a positive, statistically and clinically significant immediate effect on limb volume but no long-term effect was noted. The adherence rate to ALT was significantly higher than the adherence to self-management therapy. QOL improved in the study group.

CONCLUSION:

ALT was found to be a safe method, with high adherence, in treating women who suffer from mild to moderate lymphedema. A significant immediate and insignificant long-term effect on limb volume was noted.

PMID: 19495810

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. The treatment of depression in patients with advanced cancer undergoing palliative care.

Price A, Hotopf M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19365163

 

Source

Department of Psychological Medicine, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Weston Education Centre, London, UK.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Depression is a common condition affecting those with advanced cancer, but evidence for effective treatment has been sparse. In recent years, there has been a welcome increase in research activity, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments being trialled.

RECENT FINDINGS:

This review assesses recent studies of pharmacological interventions including antidepressants and psychostimulants and nonpharmacological interventions including cognitive behavioural therapy, supportive expressive group therapy, couples therapy, complex interventions and aromatherapy massage for treatment of depression. Recent published systematic reviews of interventions for depression are also discussed.

SUMMARY:

Recent research efforts have paid particular attention to psychological interventions, with cognitive behavioural therapy approaches being most evaluated and showing some encouraging results. Pharmacological interventions remain challenging to assess using rigorous clinical trial methodology, and clinicians still rely upon data derived from studies using general populations and those with less advanced disease or other physical illness. Methodologically sound trials of pharmacological interventions for treatment of depression in advanced disease remains an area of research need.

PMID: 19365163

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

9. Developing a model for complementary therapy for patients with cancer.

Hews S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19331077

 

Source

University College London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

Abstract

This article outlines an initiative to offer complementary therapy to patients with cancer, describing how the service was set up and funded, and the model of care. it also highlights some findings from research evidence.

PMID: 19331077

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. Pediatric oncologists' views toward the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with cancer.

Roth M, Lin J, Kim M, Moody K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19262243

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. mroth@montefiore.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pediatric oncology patients commonly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), yet approximately only 50% of these patients discuss CAM with their oncologist.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to assess barriers to CAM communication in pediatric oncology.

DESIGN/METHODS:

A 33-question survey was sent via electronic mail to 358 pediatric oncologists in the United States.

RESULTS:

Ninety pediatric oncologists completed the survey. Ninety-nine percent of pediatric oncologists think it is important to know what CAM therapies their patients use. However, less than half of pediatric oncologists routinely ask their patients about CAM. This is primarily because of a lack of time and knowledge. Many physicians think some forms of CAM may improve quality of life, such as massage (74%) and yoga (57%). Over half of physicians thought that dietary supplements, herbal medicine, special diets, vitamins, and chiropractic might be harmful to patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric oncologists believe it is important to know which CAM therapies their patients use; however, they are not asking about them owing to lack of time and knowledge. To improve communication about CAM, increased physician education is needed. In addition, physicians should identify patients using potentially harmful CAM therapies. Furthermore, CAM research in pediatric oncology should focus on those modalities physicians believe may improve patient quality of life.

PMID: 19262243

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

11. Management of cancer pain with complementary therapies.

[No authors listed]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17508495

 

Source

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Integrative Medicine Service New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

Pain is one of the most feared consequences of cancer. Pain is a major symptom in 75% of hospitalized cancer patients. Poorly relieved pain contributes to the suffering of the patient and family, which may motivate them to seek additional complementary and alternative therapies. Evidence-based complementary therapies are being used for symptom control and to improve quality of life. There is recent research on several complementary therapies-acupuncture, mind-body therapies, massage, reflexology, and Reiki--that provides evidence for pain management. These therapies are not well utilized due to a lack of information on benefits, risks, and resources. There is a call for education to alert patients, families, nurses, and physicians to the benefits of evidence-based complementary therapies and to the dangers of "unproven" cancer therapies. Oncology nurses are ideally positioned to assess patients' pain, to educate patients, to determine with the patient and physician the most appropriate and safe complementary therapy for pain, to refer patients to appropriate resources, and in some cases to provide the therapy itself. This article will discuss specific complementary therapies for pain control and will arm nurses with the confidence to intervene with knowledge, referrals, and ideas for hands-on implementation.

PMID: 17508495

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

12. The conjoint use of music therapy and reflexology with hospitalized advanced stage cancer patients and their families.

Magill L, Berenson S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18662423

 

Source

School of Music, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. lucannem@uwindsor.ca

Abstract

Advanced stage cancer patients experience debilitating physical symptoms as well as profound emotional and spiritual struggles. Advanced disease is accompanied by multiple changes and losses for the patient and the family. Palliative care focuses on the relief of overall suffering of patients and families, including symptom control, psychosocial support, and the meeting of spiritual needs. Music therapy and reflexology are complementary therapies that can soothe and provide comfort. When used conjointly, they provide a multifaceted experience that can aid in the reduction of anxiety, pain, and isolation; facilitate communication between patients, family members, and staff; and provide the potential for a more peaceful dying experience for all involved. This article addresses the benefits of the combined use of music therapy and reflexology. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the application and benefits of this dual approach for patients and their families regarding adjustment to the end of life in the presence of anxiety and cognitive impairment.

PMID: 18662423

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

13. WITHDRAWN: Aromatherapy and massage for symptom relief in patients with cancer.

Fellowes D, Barnes K, Wilkinson SS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18843631

 

Source

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research and Development Unit, Marie Curie Cancer Care, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London, London, UK, NW3 2PF.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aromatherapy massage is a commonly used complementary therapy, and is employed in cancer and palliative care largely to improve quality of life and reduce psychological distress.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether aromatherapy or massage, or both, decreases psychological morbidity, lessens symptom distress and/or improves the quality of life in patients with a diagnosis of cancer.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002), MEDLINE (1966 to May week 3 2002), CINAHL (1982 to April 2002), British Nursing Index (1994 to April 2002), EMBASE (1980 to Week 25 2002), AMED (1985 to April 2002), PsycINFO (1887 to April week 4 2002), SIGLE (1980 to March 2002), CancerLit (1975 to April 2002) and Dissertation Abstracts International (1861 to March 2002). Reference lists of relevant articles were searched for additional studies.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We sought randomised controlled trials (RCTs); controlled before and after studies; and interrupted time series studies of aromatherapy or massage, or both, for patients with cancer, that measured changes in patient-reported levels of physical or psychological distress or quality of life using reliable and valid tools.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion in the review, assessed study quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted where information was unclear.

MAIN RESULTS:

The search strategy retrieved 1322 studies. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria and these represented eight RCTs (357 participants). The most consistently found effect of massage or aromatherapy massage was on anxiety. Four trials (207 participants) measuring anxiety detected a reduction post intervention, with benefits of 19 to 32% reported. Contradictory evidence exists as to any additional benefit on anxiety conferred by the addition of aromatherapy. The evidence for the impact of massage/aromatherapy on depression was variable. Of the three trials (120 participants) that assessed depression in cancer patients, only one found any significant differences in this symptom. Three studies (117 participants) found a reduction in pain following intervention, and two (71 participants) found a reduction in nausea. Although several of the trials measured changes in other symptoms such as fatigue, anger, hostility, communication and digestive problems, none of these assessments was replicated.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

Massage and aromatherapy massage confer short term benefits on psychological well being, with the effect on anxiety supported by limited evidence. Effects on physical symptoms may also occur. Evidence is mixed as to whether aromatherapy enhances the effects of massage. Replication, longer follow up, and larger trials are need to accrue the necessary evidence.

Update of

PMID: 18843631

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer patients - analysis of influencing factors in Turkey.

Malak AT, Karayurt O, Demir E, Yümer AS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20192589

 

Source

School of Health Sciences, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Canakkale, Turkey. arzutunamalak@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This cross-sectional and descriptive study analysed complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices of patients with cancer diagnoses and influencing factors.

METHODS:

The subjects consisted of 55 cancer patients hospitalized in Canakkale State Hospital between November 2008 and March 2009 and who were willing to participate in the study. Research data were collected using a sociodemographic characteristics form regarding CAM practices of cancer patients and the Beck Hopelessness Scale (total points 20, rising with the degree of hopelessness). Written consent from the head physician of Canakkale State Hospital and verbal consents of the patients were obtained in order for the research to be performed. The data were analysed using the SPSS 13.0 program (numbers and percentages, chi-squared and Mann Whitney U tests).

FINDINGS:

Of the patients (49.1% female and 50.9% male) 78.2% had been living with a cancer diagnosis for more than two years. Of the 23.6% of patients with breast cancer and 21.8% with lung cancer, 87.2% uses CAM (72.7% received alternative treatment and 65.5% complementary treatment). Alternative treatments apply herbal treatments concomitantly such as honey, garlic; balsam apple, iscum album, tar oil and 29.1% of them only use stinging nettle. As a complementary treatment; 60% of patients pray for healing and 16.4% of them have massage regularly. Patients explained that they were using the alternative medicine in order to mitigate effects of the disease, to prevent its recurrence, to increase blood values, to feel psychologically relieved; and they were using complementary medicine just to feel psychologically relieved. Of 60% patients chose not to share their CAM practice with doctors and nurses. 36.4% of them use CAM on friend advice, 20% under media influence, 36.4% on their own initiative and 21.8% under family influence. The satisfaction from CAM is 61.1%. The rate of those who find alternative medicine expensive is 21.8%. There is statistically no correlation between CAM practice and age, gender, marital status, location they live for a long time, education and financial status of patients (p>0.05). The average of total hopelessness score of patients is 8.09 +/- 2.59, there is no statistically meaningful correlation between hopelessness score average of patients who use CAM and who do not use (p>0.05). Conclusion: The cancer patients in the study who live in Canakkale province and in its districts use CAM. CAM practice does not vary by selected sociodemographic characteristics and the hope level. It is important that the health care professionals (nurses, doctors, etc) should be conscious of CAM-drug interactions and notify the patients about the risk.

PMID:

20192589

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

15. Anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy massage in patients with breast cancer.

Imanishi J, Kuriyama H, Shigemori I, Watanabe S, Aihara Y, Kita M, Sawai K, Nakajima H, Yoshida N, Kunisawa M, Kawase M, Fukui K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18955225

 

Source

Department of Microbiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Kamikyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566, Japan. imanishi-micro@nifty.com.

Abstract

We examined how aromatherapy massage influenced psychologic and immunologic parameters in 12 breast cancer patients in an open semi-comparative trial. We compared the results 1 month before aromatherapy massage as a waiting control period with those during aromatherapy massage treatment and 1 month after the completion of aromatherapy sessions. The patients received a 30 min aromatherapy massage twice a week for 4 weeks (eight times in total). The results showed that anxiety was reduced in one 30 min aromatherapy massage in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test and also reduced in eight sequential aromatherapy massage sessions in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) test. Our results further suggested that aromatherapy massage ameliorated the immunologic state. Further investigations are required to confirm the anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy in breast cancer patients.

PMID: 18955225

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC2644279

Free PMC Article

 

16. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with cancer and general and specialty pediatrics.

Post-White J, Fitzgerald M, Hageness S, Sencer SF. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18936292

 

Source

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55403, USA. postw001@ umn.edu

Abstract

The objective of this survey is to determine the frequency, reasons, and factors influencing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in general and specialty pediatrics within the same geographic area. Of the 281 surveys completed, CAM use was higher in children with epilepsy (61.9%), cancer (59%), asthma (50.7%), and sickle cell disease (47.4%) than in general pediatrics (36%). Children most often used prayer (60.5%), massage (27.9%), specialty vitamins (27.2%), chiropractic care (25.9%), and dietary supplements (21.8%). Parents who used CAM for themselves (68.7%) were more likely to access CAM for their child. Most parents (62.6%) disclosed some or all of their child's use of CAM to providers. This study confirms that within the same geographic region, children with chronic and life-threatening illness use more CAM therapies than children seen in primary care clinics. Children with cancer use CAM for different reasons than children with non-life-threatening illnesses.

PMID: 18936292

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17. A population-based study of prevalence of complementary methods use by cancer survivors: a report from the American Cancer Society's studies of cancer survivors.

Gansler T, Kaw C, Crammer C, Smith T.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18680170

 

Source

Health Promotions, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia 30303, USA. Ted.gansler@cancer.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of complementary methods (CMs) is widespread and increasing in the United States. Most literature on CM use among cancer survivors focuses on the treatment period, whereas only a few studies address use further along the cancer continuum.

METHODS:

This study analyzed the prevalence and the medical and demographic associations of CM use among cancer survivors surveyed 10 to 24 months after diagnosis. The study's sample-4139 survivors of 1 of 10 adult cancers-was selected from stratified random samples provided by statewide cancer registries and surveyed by mail and telephone. Three logistic regression models examined associations between medical and demographic factors and CM use among survivors of sex-specific and non-sex-specific cancers.

RESULTS:

Of the 19 CMs included in the survey, the CMs most frequently reported were prayer/spiritual practice (61.4%), relaxation (44.3%), faith/spiritual healing (42.4%), nutritional supplements/vitamins (40.1%), meditation (15%), religious counseling (11.3%), massage (11.2%), and support groups (9.7%). Among these 19 CMs, the least prevalent were hypnosis (0.4%), biofeedback therapy (1.0%), and acupuncture/acupressure (1.2%). Survivors more likely to use CMs were female, younger, white, higher income, and more educated.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides information regarding prevalence and medical-demographic determinants of CM use reported by a large, population-based sample of survivors of 10 cancers surveyed 10 to 24 months after diagnosis. These findings may be used by clinicians and researchers to inform their decisions regarding which CMs to address in practice and research.

(c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

PMID: 18680170

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

18. The conjoint use of music therapy and reflexology with hospitalized advanced stage cancer patients and their families.

Magill L, Berenson S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18662423

 

Source

School of Music, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. lucannem@uwindsor.ca

Abstract

Advanced stage cancer patients experience debilitating physical symptoms as well as profound emotional and spiritual struggles. Advanced disease is accompanied by multiple changes and losses for the patient and the family. Palliative care focuses on the relief of overall suffering of patients and families, including symptom control, psychosocial support, and the meeting of spiritual needs. Music therapy and reflexology are complementary therapies that can soothe and provide comfort. When used conjointly, they provide a multifaceted experience that can aid in the reduction of anxiety, pain, and isolation; facilitate communication between patients, family members, and staff; and provide the potential for a more peaceful dying experience for all involved. This article addresses the benefits of the combined use of music therapy and reflexology. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the application and benefits of this dual approach for patients and their families regarding adjustment to the end of life in the presence of anxiety and cognitive impairment.

PMID: 18662423

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. Cancer survivors with unmet needs were more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine.

Mao JJ, Palmer SC, Straton JB, Cronholm PF, Keddem S, Knott K, Bowman MA, Barg FK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18648980

 

Source

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. maoj@uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Despite advancements in cancer care, cancer survivors continue to experience a substantial level of physical and emotional unmet needs (UMN). This study aims to determine the relationship between patients' perceived UMN and their use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to help with cancer problems during and after treatment.

METHODS:

A mailed, cross-sectional survey was completed by 614 cancer survivors identified through the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry 3.5 to 4 years from initial diagnosis. Relationships among UMN and CAM use along with clinical and socio-demographic factors were examined.

RESULTS:

Respondents who identified any UMN were 63% more likely to report CAM use than those without UMN (58% vs. 36%), p < 0.001. UMN remained the only independent predictor (adjusted odds ratio = 2.30, 95% confidence interval = 1.57-3.36, p < 0.001) of CAM use in a multivariate logistic regression model that included age, sex, marital status, education, previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Adjusted for covariates, UMN in domains of emotional, physical, nutritional, financial, informational, treatment-related, employment-related, and daily living activities were all related to CAM use, whereas UMN in transportation, home care, medical staff, family and spirituality were not related to CAM use. Patients who experienced multiple types of unmet needs were also more likely to use multiple types of CAM (p < 0.001 for model).

CONCLUSIONS:

Cancer survivors who experienced unmet needs within the existing cancer treatment and support system were more likely to use CAM to help with cancer problems. Research is needed to determine if appropriate CAM use decreases unmet needs among cancer survivors.

PMID: 18648980

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

20. Use of complementary therapies by Australian women with breast cancer.

Kremser T, Evans A, Moore A, Luxford K, Begbie S, Bensoussan A, Marigliani R, Zorbas H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18534852

 

Source

National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre, Locked Bag 3, Strawberry Hills, NSW 2012, Australia.

Abstract

International research suggests complementary therapy usage is common in women with breast cancer. Comparable data do not exist for Australia. A self-completed questionnaire was used to survey Australian women with breast cancer about their usage of complementary therapies. The survey was mailed to members of two breast cancer consumer advocacy groups, and assessed type of therapy used, reasons for use, and sources of information about complementary therapies. Of 367 respondents with breast cancer, 87.5% had used complementary therapies, with many using four or more therapies. Most commonly used were vitamin supplements (54.2%), support groups (49.8%), massage (41.4%) and meditation (38.7%). Common reasons for use included improving physical (86.3%) and emotional (83.2%) wellbeing and boosting the immune system (68.8%). Women sought information about complementary therapies from a variety of sources. The range of therapies used and the diverse reasons for use emphasise the need for reliable, evidence-based information about complementary therapies for women and clinicians.

PMID: 18534852

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

21. Integrative oncology: complementary therapies for cancer survivors.

Wesa K, Gubili J, Cassileth B.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18395154

 

Source

Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1429 First Avenue (at 74(th) Street), New York, NY 10021, USA. gubilij@mskcc.org

Abstract

Cancer survivors experience a wide range of symptoms during and following completion of treatment, and some of these symptoms may persist for years or even decades. While pharmacologic treatments relieve many symptoms, they too may produce difficult side effects. Complementary therapies are noninvasive, inexpensive, and useful in controlling symptoms and improving quality of life, and they may be accessed by patients themselves. Rigorous scientific research has produced evidence that acupuncture, massage therapy, music, and mind-body therapies effectively and safely reduce physical and emotional symptoms. These therapies provide a favorable risk-benefit ratio and permit cancer survivors to help manage their own care.

PMID: 18395154

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

22. Using complementary therapy with a hemodialysis patient with colon cancer and a sense of hopelessness].

[Article in Chinese]

Yeh SC, Yeh HF.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17935052

 

Source

Hemodialysis Center, ANSN Clinic, ROC.

Abstract

Hemodialysis patients usually have a sense of hopelessness. This can affect their physical, mental and spiritual health, and can even be life- threatening. This article discusses a nursing experience involving a dialysis patient who also suffered from cancer had and a sense of hopelessness due to the distress caused by the two severe illnesses. The author assessed the patient by means of Roy's theory during the nursing period (5/7/2005-6/18/2005). Data were collected through physical assessments, interviews, observation of interaction with family members and a medical history review. The patient had characteristics of hopelessness, such as pessimism, moodiness, frequent sighing, frowning, eye-closing and negative thinking. The author applied a safe, easy, and non-invasive complementary therapy program including music therapy, aromatherapy and massage with essential oil to improve the patient's physical and mental states. Through these approaches, the patient learned to release stress, and to express his feelings, so that he could adapt to his current life, changed as it was by the illnesses, and face the impact of those illnesses with a positive attitude. The author would like to share this case report to provide nursing professionals with a source of reference for healthcare quality improvement.

PMID: 17935052

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

24. Complementary therapies and integrative oncology in lung cancer: ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (2nd edition).

Cassileth BR, Deng GE, Gomez JE, Johnstone PA, Kumar N, Vickers AJ; American College of Chest Physicians.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17873179

 

Source

Laurance S. Rockefeller Chair in Integrative Medicine, Chief, Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1429 First Ave at Seventy-Fourth St, New York, NY 10021, USA. Cassileth@mskcc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This chapter aims to differentiate between "alternative" therapies, often promoted falsely as viable options to mainstream lung cancer treatment, and complementary therapies, adjunctive, effective techniques that treat symptoms associated with cancer and its mainstream treatment, and to describe the evidence base for use of complementary therapies. Methods and design: A multidisciplinary panel of experts in oncology and integrative medicine evaluated the evidence for complementary (not alternative) therapies in the care of patients with lung cancer. Because few complementary modalities are geared to patients with only a single cancer diagnosis, symptom-control research conducted with other groups of patients with cancer was also included. Data on complementary therapies such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mind-body therapies, herbs and other botanicals, and exercise were evaluated. Recommendations were based on the strength of evidence and the risk-to-benefit ratio.

RESULTS:

Patients with lung and other poor-outlook cancers are particularly vulnerable to heavily promoted claims for unproved or disproved "alternatives." Inquiring about patients' use of these therapies should be routine because these practices may be harmful and can delay or impair treatment. Mind-body modalities and massage therapy can reduce anxiety, mood disturbance, and chronic pain. Acupuncture assists the control of pain and other side effects and helps reduce levels of pain medication required. Trials of acupuncture for chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and postthoracotomy pain show promising results. Herbal products and other dietary supplements should be evaluated for side effects and potential interactions with chemotherapy and other medications.

CONCLUSIONS:

Complementary therapies have an increasingly important role in the control of symptoms associated with cancer and cancer treatment.

PMID: 17873179

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

25. Trends in complementary/alternative medicine use by breast cancer survivors: comparing survey data from 1998 and 2005.

Boon HS, Olatunde F, Zick SM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17397542

 

Source

Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. heather.boon@utoronto.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by women with breast cancer is often said to be increasing, yet few data exist to confirm this commonly held belief. The purpose of this paper is to compare overall patterns of CAM use, as well as use of specific products and therapies at two different points in time (1998 vs 2005) by women diagnosed with breast cancer.

METHODS:

Surveys were mailed to women randomly selected from the Ontario Cancer Registry (Canada) in the spring of 1998 (n = 557) and again in the spring of 2005(n = 877).

RESULTS:

The response rates were 76.3% in 1998 and 63% in 2005. In 1998, 66.7% of women reported using either a CAM product/therapy or seeing a CAM therapist at some time in their lives as compared with 81.9% in 2005 (p = 0.0002). Increases were seen in both use of CAM products/therapies (62% in 1998 vs. 70.6% in 2005) and visits to CAM practitioners (39.4% of respondents in 1998 vs 57.4% of respondents in 2005). Women in 2005 reported that 41% used CAM for treating their breast cancer. The most commonly used products and practitioners for treating breast cancer as reported in 2005 were green tea, vitamin E, flaxseed, vitamin C, massage therapists and dietitians/nutritionists.

CONCLUSION:

CAM use (both self-medication with products and visits to CAM practitioners) increased significantly from 1998 to 2005. Now that more than 80% of all women with breast cancer report using CAM (41% in a specific attempt to management their breast cancer), CAM use can no longer be regarded as an "alternative" or unusual approach to managing breast cancer.

PMID: 17397542

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC1851951

Free PMC Article

 

26. A critical review of complementary therapies for cancer-related fatigue.

Sood A, Barton DL, Bauer BA, Loprinzi CL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17351022

 

Source

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. sood.amit@mayo.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To review the available literature on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments for cancer-related fatigue with an aim to develop directions for future research.

METHODS:

PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched for relevant studies. Original clinical trials reporting on the use of CAM treatments for cancer-related fatigue were abstracted and critically reviewed.

RESULTS:

CAM interventions tested for cancer-related fatigue include acupuncture, aromatherapy, adenosine triphosphate infusions, energy conservation and activity management, healing touch, hypnosis, lectin-standardized mistletoe extract, levocarnitine, massage, mindfulness-based stress reduction, polarity therapy, relaxation, sleep promotion, support group, and Tibetan yoga. Several of these interventions seem promising in initial studies.

CONCLUSION:

Currently, insufficient data exist to recommend any specific CAM modality for cancer-related fatigue. Therefore, potentially effective CAM interventions ready for further study in large, randomized clinical trials (eg, acupuncture, massage, levocarnitine, and the use of mistletoe) should be pursued. Other interventions should be tested in well-designed feasibility and phase II trials.

PMID: 17351022

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

27. Effectiveness of aromatherapy massage in the management of anxiety and depression in patients with cancer: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

Wilkinson SM, Love SB, Westcombe AM, Gambles MA, Burgess CC, Cargill A, Young T, Maher EJ, Ramirez AJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17290062

 

Source

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Unit, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Department of Mental Health Sciences, Cancer Research UK London Psychosocial Group, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To test the effectiveness of supplementing usual supportive care with aromatherapy massage in the management of anxiety and depression in cancer patients through a pragmatic two-arm randomized controlled trial in four United Kingdom cancer centers and a hospice.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Two hundred eighty-eight cancer patients, referred to complementary therapy services with clinical anxiety and/or depression, were allocated randomly to a course of aromatherapy massage or usual supportive care alone.

RESULTS:

Patients who received aromatherapy massage had no significant improvement in clinical anxiety and/or depression compared with those receiving usual care at 10 weeks postrandomization (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.7; P = .1), but did at 6 weeks postrandomization (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.9; P = .01). Patients receiving aromatherapy massage also described greater improvement in self-reported anxiety at both 6 and 10 weeks postrandomization (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 0.2 to 6.7; P = .04 and OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 0.2 to 6.6; P = .04), respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Aromatherapy massage does not appear to confer benefit on cancer patients' anxiety and/or depression in the long-term, but is associated with clinically important benefit up to 2 weeks after the intervention.

PMID: 17290062

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

28. Use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies to control symptoms in women living with lung cancer.

Wells M, Sarna L, Cooley ME, Brown JK, Chernecky C, Williams RD, Padilla G, Danao LL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17235219

 

Source

School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6918, USA.

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by cancer patients, especially women, is increasing. However, CAM use among patients with lung cancer, who have been reported to have the highest symptom burden, is poorly documented. This study describes types and frequencies of specific CAM therapies used by women with lung cancer to manage symptoms, and examines differences in demographic and clinical characteristics between CAM users and non-CAM users. Participants included 189 women with non-small cell lung cancer and > or =1 of 8 symptoms. Six CAM therapies, used to control symptoms, were assessed, including herbs, tea, acupuncture, massage, meditation, and prayer. Forty-four percent (84 women) used CAM therapies, including prayer (34.9%), meditation (11.6%), tea (11.6%), herbs (9.0%), massage (6.9%), and acupuncture (2.6%). Complementary and alternative medicine use was greatest for difficulty breathing and pain (54.8% each), with prayer the most commonly used CAM for all symptoms. Significant differences (P < .05) were found for age (t = 2.24), symptom frequency (t = -3.02), and geographic location (chi = 7.51). Women who were younger, experienced more symptoms, and lived on the West Coast or South (vs Northeast) were more likely to use CAM. We found that CAM use is variable by symptom and may be an indicator of symptom burden. Our results provide important initial data regarding CAM use for managing symptoms by women with lung cancer.

PMID: 17235219

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

29. Nursing students' willingness to use complementary and alternative therapies for cancer patients: Istanbul survey.

Oztekin DS, Ucuzal M, Oztekin I, Işsever H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17202772

 

Source

Florence Nightingale College of Nursing, Istanbul University, Kadikoy, 34726 Istanbul, Turkey. dnzoztekin@hotmail.com

Abstract

It is important for student nurses to be knowledgeable of the complementary and alternative therapies and to provide accurate information to both cancer patients and other health care professionals. This study examined the nursing students' willingness to use these therapies, availability of sources of information, use of the therapies for self care, opinions about the integration of these therapies into nursing curriculum, and analyzed the differences among the responses. A self-administered questionnaire was offered to 640 nursing students in Istanbul, descriptive statistics were used, and comparisons among responses were made with chi-square test. Willingness to use for cancer patients was highest for nutritional therapy (76.1%), breathing therapies (74.5%), and massage and manipulation-Tui Na, in which pressure and touch are applied to the body (71.9%). Use of information sources was highest for nutritional therapy (75.6%), breathing therapies (71.9%), and massage and manipulation-Tui Na (62.3%). Over half of the nursing students used music therapy (54.2%), and massage and manipulation-Tui Na (53.6%) for self-care. Breathing therapies (87.2%) were the most desired therapy chosen to be included in nursing curriculum. The statistically significant differences were found among the responses related to use five therapies for care and related to desired three therapies to be included in nursing curriculum. Although students had not previously been exposed to these therapies use with oncology patients, many of students expressed a desire to integrate therapies learning into nursing curriculum. The more student nurses document high risk patients, the more effective strategies will be developed by other health care professionals.

PMID: 17202772

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

30. Long-term survival of a patient with widespread metastases from epithelial ovarian carcinoma receiving mind-body therapies: case report and review of the literature.

Lev-ari S, Maimon Y, Yaal-Hahoshen N.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17101768

 

Source

Unit of Complementary Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

Five-year survival of patients with stage IV epithelial ovarian carcinoma not treated after recurrence is almost non-existent in oncological literature. The authors report a patient almost 30 years after surgery of the primary epithelial ovarian carcinoma lesion and 15 years after recurrent disease and incomplete chemotherapy who is alive without evidence of disease. She received no conventional oncological therapy during the past 15 years but rather used many types of alternative medicine, predominantly mind body therapies. The authors review the relevant literature on this subject and describe what they believe to be the first report of long-term survival of such a patient.

PMID: 17101768

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

31. Complementary medicine in palliative care and cancer symptom management.

Mansky PJ, Wallerstedt DB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17034678

 

Source

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. manskyp@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients varies according to geographical area, gender, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in the United States has been estimated to be between 7% and 54%. Most cancer patients use CAM with the hope of boosting the immune system, relieving pain, and controlling side effects related to disease or treatment. Only a minority of patients include CAM in the treatment plan with curative intent. This review article focuses on practices belonging to the CAM domains of mind-body medicine, CAM botanicals, manipulative practices, and energy medicine, because they are widely used as complementary approaches to palliative cancer care and cancer symptom management. In the area of cancer symptom management, auricular acupuncture, therapeutic touch, and hypnosis may help to manage cancer pain. Music therapy, massage, and hypnosis may have an effect on anxiety, and both acupuncture and massage may have a therapeutic role in cancer fatigue. Acupuncture and selected botanicals may reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and hypnosis and guided imagery may be beneficial in anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Transcendental meditation and the mindfulness-based stress reduction can play a role in the management of depressed mood and anxiety. Black cohosh and phytoestrogen-rich foods may reduce vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Most CAM approaches to the treatment of cancer are safe when used by a CAM practitioner experienced in the treatment of cancer patients. The potential for many commonly used botanical to interact with prescription drugs continues to be a concern. Botanicals should be used with caution by cancer patients and only under the guidance of an oncologist knowledgeable in their use.

PMID: 17034678

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

32. Use of selected complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in veterans with cancer or chronic pain: a cross-sectional survey.

McEachrane-Gross FP, Liebschutz JM, Berlowitz D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17026768

 

Source

Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, 200 Springs Road, Bedford, MA, USA. eachrane@mchsi.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is emerging as an important form of care in the United States. We sought to measure the prevalence of selected CAM use among veterans attending oncology and chronic pain clinics and to describe the characteristics of CAM use in this population.

METHODS:

The self-administered, mail-in survey included questions on demographics, health beliefs, medical problems and 6 common CAM treatments (herbs, dietary supplements, chiropractic care, massage therapy, acupuncture and homeopathy) use. We used the chi-square test to examine bivariate associations between our predictor variables and CAM use.

RESULTS:

Seventy-two patients (27.3%) reported CAM use within the past 12 months. CAM use was associated with more education (p = 0.02), higher income (p = 0.006), non-VA insurance (p = 0.003), additional care outside the VA (p = 0.01) and the belief that lifestyle contributes to illness (p = 0.015). The diagnosis of chronic pain versus cancer was not associated with differential CAM use (p = 0.15). Seventy-six percent of CAM non-users reported that they would use it if offered at the VA.

CONCLUSION:

Use of 6 common CAM treatments among these veterans is lower than among the general population, but still substantial. A large majority of veterans reported interest in using CAM modalities if they were offered at the VA. A national assessment of veteran interest in CAM may assist VA leaders to respond to patients' needs.

PMID: 17026768

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC1617117

Free PMC Article

 

33. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

Swarup AB, Barrett W, Jazieh AR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17023781

 

Source

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread among patients with chronic diseases including cancer. The purpose of our study was to examine the pattern of alternative medicine use in patients undergoing radiation treatment of cancer.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted among cancer patients treated with radiation therapy from July 2003 through July 2005 at the University of Cincinnati. We defined CAM as the use of dietary supplements, massage therapy, prayer, acupuncture, chiropractic, and other novel therapies undertaken after their diagnosis with cancer.

RESULTS:

There were 152 patients that participated in the study. Their median age was 59 (range, 21-85), 82 (54%) were males, 108 (69%) were Caucasian. Out of 152 patients, 104 (68%) patients were users of CAM. The most common CAM modality reported was prayer 85 (82%) and use of dietary supplements 84 (80%). The majority of users were female and well-educated. Among CAM users 60 (58%) had discussed its use with their physician. Level of education, employment status and income showed a significant correlation with the use of CAM.

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrates that the use of complementary alternative medicine among cancer patients receiving radiation therapy is frequent. Given the potential risks with some CAM therapies, physicians should actively ask patients whether they use CAM and provide appropriate counseling.

PMID: 17023781

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

34. Lifestyle, biomechanical, and bioenergetic complementary therapies in pediatric oncology.

McLean TW, Kemper KJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17022926

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA. tmclean@wfubmc.edu

Abstract

After the diagnosis of cancer in a child is made, many families complement conventional medical care with lifestyle changes including diet, exercise, environment, and mind-body therapies. Biomechanical, bioenergetic, and other therapies are also sometimes sought. These include massage, chiropractic, acupuncture/acupressure, therapeutic touch, Reiki, homeopathy, and prayer. Some of these complementary therapies have well-established roles in cancer therapy for children, whereas others are controversial and require more research.

PMID: 17022926

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

35. Critical review of complementary therapies in haemato-oncology.

Joske DJ, Rao A, Kristjanson L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16911550

 

Source

Cancer Support Centre and Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. david.joske@health.wa.gov.au

Abstract

There is evidence of the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine by Australians diagnosed with cancer. Given the increasing desire of cancer patients to use complementary and alternative medicine, it is important that clinicians have a good understanding of the evidence available in this field. This critical review aims to provide an overview of the current evidence pertaining to a range of complementary therapies that are used in a supportive role in the treatment of cancer patients. Treatment methods considered are acupuncture, music therapy, massage and touch therapies and psychological interventions. The efficacy of these complementary therapies in terms of improvement in symptoms and quality of life is examined. Evidence that relates to an effect on immune function and survival is also investigated.

Comment in

PMID: 16911550

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

36. Correlates of use of different types of complementary and alternative medicine by breast cancer survivors in the nurses' health study.

Buettner C, Kroenke CH, Phillips RS, Davis RB, Eisenberg DM, Holmes MD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16821087

 

Source

Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215-3325, USA. catherine_buettner@hms.harvard.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Among breast cancer survivors, we identified the prevalence and correlates of use of different types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We included 2,022 women diagnosed with breast cancer 1998-2003 who responded to a survey about CAM use. We performed logistic regression to determine demographic and disease factors associated with use of different CAM therapies (including relaxation/imagery, spiritual healing, yoga, energy healing, acupuncture, massage, chiropractic, high-dose vitamins, herbs, and homeopathy). We also measured quality of life (QoL) using the SF36 and optimism using LOT-R and fit linear regression models to compare mean scores among CAM users and nonusers.

RESULTS:

Sixty-two percent of respondents used CAM. Younger age was the most consistent correlate of CAM use, but factors associated with CAM use varied by type of CAM. Chemotherapy was associated with use of relaxation/imagery (OR 1.3 95%CI 1.1-1.7). Radiotherapy was associated with use of high-dose vitamins (OR 1.5 95% CI 1.2-2.0). Tamoxifen or anastrozole treatment was associated with use of homeopathy (OR 0.5 95%CI 0.3-0.9). Users of most types of CAM had worse QoL scores than nonusers, but better QoL was found among users of yoga. The lowest QoL scores were associated with the use of energy healing. Optimism was higher among users of relaxation/imagery.

CONCLUSIONS:

Factors associated with CAM use varied according to type of CAM. Our finding of worse QoL among women using energy healing and better QoL among women using yoga suggests the need for longitudinal studies to deter.

PMID: 16821087
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

37. Legal and ethical issues relating to use of complementary therapies in pediatric hematology/oncology.

Cohen MH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16679948

 

Source

Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, Law Offices, 1811 NW 51 St., Suite 1289, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, USA.

Abstract

Pediatricians increasingly are asked to advise pediatric patients and their families concerning integration into conventional care (including hematology and oncology) of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies such as chiropractic, massage therapy, and herbal medicine. Inclusion of CAM therapies in pediatric oncology and hematology--as in any medical subspecialty--is not itself "unethical," clinically inadvisable, or legally risky; the danger comes from over-reliance on one or more CAM therapies (particularly those with evidence of danger and/or paltry evidence of success) to the exclusion of conventional care that is curative and imminently necessary. Pediatricians can help address potential malpractice liability issues by evaluating the level of clinical risk, engaging the patient in shared decision making and documenting this in the medical record, continuing to monitor conventionally, and being prepared to intervene conventionally when medically required.

PMID: 16679948

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE)

 

38. Patient-physician communication regarding use of complementary therapies during cancer treatment.

Roberts CS, Baker F, Hann D, Runfola J, Witt C, McDonald J, Livingston ML, Ruiterman J, Ampela R, Kaw OC, Blanchard C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16618687

 

Source

School of Social Work, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA.

Abstract

It is estimated that as many as 80% of adult cancer patients use at least one form of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) during or after conventional treatment. Studies of physician-patient communication about the use of CAM have concluded that patients frequently do not tell their oncologists about their use of CAM and physicians consistently underestimate the numbers of their patients using CAM. The purpose of this multi-site study was to assess newly diagnosed cancer patients' and oncologists' communication practices with regard to complementary therapies. Patients (106 breast and 82 prostate) indicated which of 45 complementary therapies they were using while physicians at their institutions indicated which they supported. It is noted that, although we use the popular acronym "CAM" all patients surveyed were receiving conventional medical treatment. Thus, the survey addressed complementary therapies only. A large majority (84%) indicated they were using at least one therapy with the most popular being exercise, vitamins, prayer, and nutritional supplements. Surprisingly, the oncologists surveyed were generally enthusiastic and supportive of patients' use of complementary therapies. In addition to those therapies popular with patients, at least half the physicians supported massage, journal writing, support groups, acupuncture, biofeedback, and art therapy. However, discussions of CAM are relatively rare and most likely to be initiated by patients. When the topic is discussed, both patients and doctors say it usually enhances their relationship. Implications for CAM program development and oncology professionals' roles in patient education regarding complementary therapies are presented.

PMID: 16618687

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

39. Patterns of use of complementary therapies among cancer patients and their family caregivers.

Kozachik SL, Wyatt G, Given CW, Given BA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16565617

 

Source

School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. skozach1@son.jhmi.edu

Abstract

Complementary therapies (CTs) are gaining popularity in the general population, including cancer patients, yet little is known about characteristics differentiating the use of one versus more CTs, about the patterns and persistence of CT use over time, or about the characteristics of cancer patients and their family caregivers who elect to participate in a study involving the use of CTs. The focus of this quasi-experimental study was to offer an 8-week, 5-contact, nurse-delivered intervention involving guided imagery, reflexology, and reminiscence therapy to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and their family caregivers. Participants were allowed to elect to use none or any combination of CTs. Twenty-seven percent of eligible patients signed consent forms and agreed to participate. The typical participant was Caucasian, married, and had at least a high school education. Higher levels of education predicted use of more than 1 CT among cancer patients; there were no significant predictors for caregivers. Female patients were more likely to complete the CT protocol than their male counterparts, but there were no associations between CT protocol completion and caregiver demographics. Patients and family caregivers who elected to use more than 1 CT did not consistently implement their CTs. Participants who elected to use only 1 CT were more consistently performing their CT over time, suggesting that this lower level of CT use may be easier to integrate into their lives during cancer treatment.

PMID: 16565617

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

40. Predictors of use of complementary and alternative therapies among patients with cancer.

Fouladbakhsh JM, Stommel M, Given BA, Given CW.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16270107

 

Source

College of Nursing, Michigan State University in East Lansing, USA. judif129@comcast.net

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

To determine predictors of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies among patients with cancer.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of two federally funded panel studies.

SETTING:

Urban and rural communities in the midwestern United States.

SAMPLE:

Patients with lung, breast, colon, or prostate cancer (N = 968) were interviewed at two points in time. 97% received conventional cancer treatment, and 30% used CAM. The sample was divided evenly between men and women, who ranged in age from 28-98; the majority was older than 60.

METHODS:

Data from a patient self-administered questionnaire were used to determine CAM users. Responses indicated use of herbs and vitamins, spiritual healing, relaxation, massage, acupuncture, energy healing, hypnosis, therapeutic spas, lifestyle diets, audio or videotapes, medication wraps, and osteopathic, homeopathic, and chiropractic treatment.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

Dependent variable for analysis was use or nonuse of any of the identified CAM therapies at time of interviews. Independent variables fell into the following categories: (a) predisposing (e.g., gender, age, race, education, marital status), (b) enabling (e.g., income, health insurance status, caregiver presence, geographic location), and (c) need (e.g., cancer stage, site, symptoms, treatment, perceived health need).

FINDINGS:

Significant predictors of CAM use were gender, marital status, cancer stage, cancer treatment, and number of severe symptoms experienced.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with cancer are using CAM while undergoing conventional cancer treatment.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:

Nurses need to assess for CAM use, advocate for protocols and guidelines for routine assessment, increase knowledge of CAM, and examine coordination of services between conventional medicine and CAM to maximize positive patient outcomes.

PMID: 16270107

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

41. Complementary medicine in chronic cancer care.

Monti DA, Yang J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15815969

 

Source

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. monti1@pol.net

Abstract

Although advancements in cancer care have led to increased cure rates and survival times, those coping with the long-term sequelae of a cancer diagnosis often report high levels of distress, poor health-related quality of life, and unmet psychosocial needs. The shortcomings of the conventional biomedical system at sufficiently addressing these chronic illness issues are a primary reason that many patients turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Although patients usually use such treatments in addition to conventional care, they often do not discuss doing so with their conventional physicians, who are perceived as being unreceptive to the topic. Physicians may feel uninformed about CAM treatments, especially given the relatively small amount of data on the topic available in the medical literature. This article reviews a few CAM modalities commonly used by cancer survivors and those with chronic cancer illness, with a particular focus on familiarizing physicians with treatments that may potentially complement regular oncologic care by decreasing stress and enhancing health-related quality of life.

PMID: 15815969

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

42. Integrative oncology: complementary therapies for pain, anxiety, and mood disturbance.

Deng G, Cassileth BR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15761079

 

Source

Assistant Member, Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Many people with cancer experience pain, anxiety, and mood disturbance. Conventional treatments do not always satisfactorily relieve these symptoms, and some patients may not be able to tolerate their side effects. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, massage, and other methods can help relieve symptoms and improve physical and mental well-being. Self-hypnosis and relaxation techniques help reduce procedural pain. Acupuncture is well documented to relieve chronic cancer pain. Massage and meditation improve anxiety and other symptoms of distress. Many dietary supplements contain biologically active constituents with effects on mood. However, not all complementary therapies are appropriate or useful, and even helpful complementary modalities may not be optimal under some circumstances. Situations when precaution is indicated include acute onset of symptoms and severe symptoms, which require immediate mainstream intervention. Dietary supplements are associated with serious negative consequences under some circumstances. The authors summarize the research on these modalities and discuss the rationale, expectation, and necessary precautions involved with combining complementary therapies and mainstream care. Practical clinical issues are addressed.

PMID: 15761079

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

43. Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in cancer patients during treatment.

Yates JS, Mustian KM, Morrow GR, Gillies LJ, Padmanaban D, Atkins JN, Issell B, Kirshner JJ, Colman LK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15711946

 

Source

James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. Jennifer_Yates@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

GOALS OF WORK:

To assess complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies being utilized by cancer patients during treatment and communication about CAM usage between the patient and physician.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Newly diagnosed cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or radiation therapy were recruited to complete a CAM survey within 2 weeks after the termination of treatment. Patients were queried on which CAM modalities they utilized and whether or not they were discussed with either their oncologist or primary care physician.

MAIN RESULTS:

Of the patients surveyed, 91% reported using at least one form of CAM. The most widely used forms of CAM were prayer, relaxation and exercise. CAM users tended to be women chemotherapy patients with at least a high school education. Of the patients using CAM, 57% discussed the use of at least one of these therapies with their oncologist or primary care physician. The most frequent CAM modalities discussed with at least one physician were diets, massage, and herbal medicine.

CONCLUSIONS:

An overwhelming proportion of cancer patients are using CAM, particularly prayer, relaxation, and exercise. However, patients may not discuss the use of CAMs at all or fully with their physician; if they do, it is most likely to be their oncologist, but not about the most frequently used CAMs. Future research needs to assess effective ways for oncologists to gather information about CAM usage by patients during allopathic treatment and discern ways these therapies may enhance or interfere with traditional cancer treatments.

PMID: 15711946

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

44. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

Deng G, Cassileth BR, Yeung KS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15524070

 

Source

Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, Box 303, New York, New York 10021, USA. dengg@mskcc.org

Abstract

Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged.

PMID: 15524070

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

45. Does aromatherapy massage benefit patients with cancer attending a specialist palliative care day centre?

Wilcock A, Manderson C, Weller R, Walker G, Carr D, Carey AM, Broadhurst D, Mew J, Ernst E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15198118

 

Source

Hayward House Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Cancer Unit, Nottingham City Hospital NHS Trust, Hucknall Road, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK. andrew.wilcock@nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

A randomised controlled pilot study was carried out to examine the effects of adjunctive aromatherapy massage on mood, quality of life and physical symptoms in patients with cancer attending a specialist unit. Participants were randomised to conventional day care alone or day care plus weekly aromatherapy massage using a standardised blend of oils for four weeks. At baseline and at weekly intervals, patients rated their mood, quality of life and the intensity and bother of two symptoms most important to them. Forty-six patients were recruited to the study. Due to a large number of withdrawals, only 11 of 23 (48%) patients in the aromatherapy group and 18 of 23 (78%) in the control group completed all four weeks. Mood, physical symptoms and quality of life improved in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in any of the outcome measures. Despite a lack of measurable benefit, all patients were satisfied with the aromatherapy and wished to continue. Whilst this pilot study has shown that a randomised controlled trial of complementary therapy is feasible, it has also identified several areas that would require further consideration when designing future studies, e.g., the recruitment and retention of appropriate numbers of patients and the outcome measures used.

PMID: 15198118

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

46. Aromatherapy and massage for symptom relief in patients with cancer.

Fellowes D, Barnes K, Wilkinson S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15106172

 

Source

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research and Development Unit, Marie Curie Cancer Care, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London, London, UK, NW3 2PF.

Update in

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aromatherapy massage is a commonly used complementary therapy, and is employed in cancer and palliative care largely to improve quality of life and reduce psychological distress.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether aromatherapy and/or massage decreases psychological morbidity, lessens symptom distress and/or improves the quality of life in patients with a diagnosis of cancer.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched CENTRAL (Cochrane Library Issue 1 2002), MEDLINE (1966 to May week 3 2002), CINAHL (1982 to April 2002), British Nursing Index (1994 to April 2002), EMBASE (1980 to Week 25 2002), AMED (1985 to April 2002), PsycINFO (1887 to April week 4 2002), SIGLE (1980 to March 2002), CancerLit (1975 to April 2002) and Dissertation Abstracts International (1861 to March 2002). Reference lists of relevant articles were searched for additional studies.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We sought randomised controlled trials; controlled before and after studies; and interrupted time series studies of aromatherapy and/or massage for patients with cancer, that measured changes in patient-reported levels of physical or psychological distress or quality of life using reliable and valid tools.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion in the review, assessed study quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted where information was unclear.

MAIN RESULTS:

The search strategy retrieved 1322 references. Ten reports met the inclusion criteria and these represented eight RCTs (357 patients). The most consistently found effect of massage or aromatherapy massage was on anxiety. Four trials (207 patients) measuring anxiety detected a reduction post intervention, with benefits of 19-32% reported. Contradictory evidence exists as to any additional benefit on anxiety conferred by the addition of aromatherapy. The evidence for the impact of massage/aromatherapy on depression was variable. Of the three trials (120 patients) that assessed depression in cancer patients, only one found any significant differences in this symptom. Three studies (117 patients) found a reduction in pain following intervention, and two (71 patients) found a reduction in nausea. Although several of the trials measured changes in other symptoms such as fatigue, anger, hostility, communication and digestive problems, none of these assessments was replicated.

REVIEWERS' CONCLUSIONS:

Massage and aromatherapy massage confer short term benefits on psychological wellbeing, with the effect on anxiety supported by limited evidence. Effects on physical symptoms may also occur. Evidence is mixed as to whether aromatherapy enhances the effects of massage. Replication, longer follow up, and larger trials are need to accrue the necessary evidence.

PMID: 15106172

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

47. Complementary and alternative cancer therapies: past, present and the future scenario.

Shukla Y, Pal SK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15074998

 

Source

Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow-226 001, India. Yogeshwer_Shukla@hotmail.com

Abstract

Use of complementary and alternative therapies is widespread among cancer patients. Throughout the world cancer patients try many questionable or unproven treatment methods. The reasons for adopting these therapies are complex and are related to the social and cultural contexts of their geographical locations. In case of severe illness, the desire to leave no stone unturned is a powerful motivator. In developing countries, ignorance, socioeconomics, and inadequate access to mainstream medical facilities are major factors that play an important role for patients opting for alternative therapies that are replacements for mainstream treatment. Whereas in developed countries a significant proportion of cancer patients try complementary therapies as adjuncts to mainstream care for management of symptoms and to improve quality of life. Many alternative therapies, including pharmacological and biological treatments, remain highly controversial but at the same time are very popular. Evidence from randomized trial supports the value of hypnosis for cancer pain and nausea; relaxation therapy and massage for anxiety; and acupuncture for nausea. This article reviews the different popular alternative cancer therapies practiced in India and neighboring south east Asian countries to project the current international scenario on complementary and alternative cancer therapies.

PMID: 15074998

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

48. The use of complementary and alternative medical providers by insured cancer patients in Washington State.

Lafferty WE, Bellas A, Corage Baden A, Tyree PT, Standish LJ, Patterson R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15042688

 

Source

Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. billlaf@u.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Insurance coverage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is expanding. However, to the authors' knowledge, little is know concerning CAM utilization among cancer patients under the insurance model of financing. In this study, the authors evaluated CAM provider utilization by cancer patients in a state that requires the inclusion of alternative practitioners in private, commercial insurance products.

METHODS:

An analysis was carried out of year 2000 claims data from two large Washington State insurance companies.

RESULTS:

Of 357,709 claimants, 7915 claimants (2.3%) had a cancer diagnosis. Among cancer patients, 7.1% had a claim for naturopathy, acupuncture, or massage; and 11.6% had a claim for chiropractic during the study year. The use of naturopathy (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; P<0.001) and acupuncture (OR, 1.4; P<0.001) were more common, and the use of chiropractic was less common (OR, 0.9; P<0.001) for cancer patients compared with those without cancer. No significant differences were noted in the use of massage between the two groups. Except in 2 individuals (0.03%), cancer patients also had at least 1 conventional provider claim during the year. Factors associated with nonchiropractic alternative provider use were female gender, the presence of metastatic cancer, hematologic malignancy, and the use of chemotherapy. Increased use of naturopathic physicians accounted for much of this trend. Musculoskeletal pain was the most common diagnosis at the CAM provider visit. Billed amounts for alternative services were <2% of the overall medical bills for cancer patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

A substantial number of insured cancer patients will use alternative providers if they are given the choice. The cost of this treatment is modest compared with conventional care charges. For individuals with cancer, CAM providers do not appear to be replacing conventional providers but instead are integrated into overall care.

Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.

PMID: 15042688

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

49. 'Thinking outside the box': complementary and alternative therapies use in paediatric oncology patients.

Molassiotis A, Cubbin D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15003744

 

Source

School of Nursing, Midwifery & Health Visiting, University of Manchester, UK.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among children with cancer who had received or were receiving treatment at a large hospital in the UK, including the identification of the most commonly used therapies and parental motives for doing so. Using a cross-sectional survey design, questionnaires were sent to parents of paediatric patients diagnosed with cancer. Of the 49 respondents, 32.7% reported using some type of CAM. The most commonly used therapies included multivitamins, aromatherapy massage, diets and music as therapy. Most children had used more than one therapy. Many of the factors that motivated parents to use CAM were related to helping or supporting their child's medical treatment. The main benefits identified from using CAM included increased confidence, pain relief and relaxation. The longer the time since diagnosis the more children tended to use CAM. The reasons for parents not using CAM included the child doing well and therefore not seeing the need for CAM use; not being aware of CAM; CAM not being offered and lack of information available. Parents identified a need for more information to be available both at ward level and for information about CAM to be discussed by medical staff, particularly at the start of treatment. The results indicate that CAM is frequently used by children and young people with cancer and that their use plays a substantial role in helping children through their conventional cancer treatment.

PMID: 15003744

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

50. Cancer supportive care, improving the quality of life for cancer patients. A program evaluation report.

Rosenbaum E, Gautier H, Fobair P, Neri E, Festa B, Hawn M, Andrews A, Hirshberger N, Selim S, Spiegel D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14991388

 

Source

Stanford Cancer Supportive Care Program, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 1101 Welch Road, Bldg. A, Ste. 6, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ernie@lmi.net

Abstract

GOALS OF WORK:

As medical care for cancer has become more specialized in diagnosis, treatment has become more technical and fragmented. In order to help cancer patients and their families, we developed a coordinated program called the Stanford Cancer Supportive Care Program (SCSCP) at the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. The Stanford Cancer Supportive Care Program was initiated in 1999 to provide support for cancer patients, addressing the need for improved physical and emotional well-being and quality of life. This paper is a program evaluation report.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

The number of patient visits grew from 421 in 1999 to 6319 in 2002. This paper describes the utilization of the SCSCP program as assessed by 398 patient visit evaluations during a 9-week period, January 2002 to March 2002. During this time we collected attendance records with demographic data and anonymous questionnaires evaluating each program. Patients were asked to evaluate how the program helped them regarding increase of energy, reduction in stress, restful sleep, pain reduction, sense of hopefulness, and empowerment.

MAIN RESULTS:

Over 90% of the patients using the SCSCP felt there was benefit to the program. Programs were chosen based on a needs assessment by oncologists, nurse managers, social workers, and patients. Massage, yoga, and qigong classes had the highest number of participants. Qualitative data showed benefit for each program offered.

CONCLUSIONS:

This evaluation of a free cancer supportive care program initiated in a hospital outpatient setting provides initial evidence of patient satisfaction and improvement in quality of life.

PMID: 14991388

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

51. Knowledge of and attitudes toward complementary and alternative therapies; a national multicentre study of oncology professionals in Norway.

Risberg T, Kolstad A, Bremnes Y, Holte H, Wist EA, Mella O, Klepp O, Wilsgaard T, Cassileth BR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14962719

 

Source

Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Tromsø, N-9038 Tromsø, Norway. terje.risberg@unn.no

Abstract

This study reports on oncology professionals' knowledge and attitude toward complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), classified according to their primary application as complementary or alternative methods. In June 2002, we conducted a national, multicentre survey of 828 Norwegian oncologists, nurses, clerks and therapeutic radiographers. A response rate of 61% was achieved. Only a few physicians (4%) described their reactions to alternative medicine as positive compared with nurses (33%), therapeutic radiographers (32%) and clerks (55%) (P<0.0001). Females showed a more positive view than males (33% versus 14%, P<0.0001). More participants expressed a positive attitude to complementary versus alternative medicines. Most respondents regarded healing by hand or prayer, homeopathy, and Iscador (mistletoe) as alternative therapies. In contrast, most respondents classified acupuncture, meditation, reflexology, music/art-therapy, aromatherapy and massage as complementary therapies. This survey demonstrates major differences, by gender as well as oncology health profession in views about and the classification of various CAM methods.

PMID: 14962719

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

52. Design and testing of the use of a complementary and alternative therapies survey in women with breast cancer.

Lengacher CA, Bennett MP, Kipp KE, Berarducci A, Cox CE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12949594

 

Source

College of Nursing, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. clengach@hsc.usf.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

To design and test a reliable and valid instrument to determine the frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies among women diagnosed with breast cancer.

DESIGN:

A descriptive cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Women were recruited from the southeastern area and a rural midwestern area of the United States.

SAMPLE:

105 predominantly Caucasian women (mean= 59 years of age) with a diagnosis of breast cancer.

METHODS:

The Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies Survey was designed with a content validity index, and reliability was determined with the coefficient alpha. Exploratory factor analysis using a principal components analysis identified primary components (factors) embedded within the survey. Frequency of CAM therapy use was calculated for 33 individual therapies listed on the survey and among three survey-defined subscales of CAM therapies (i.e., diet and nutritional supplements, stress-reducing techniques, and traditional and ethnic medicines).

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

Psychometric properties of an instrument to assess frequency of use of CAM among women with breast cancer.

FINDINGS:

The reported prevalence of use of the individual CAM therapies varied considerably. The coefficient alpha estimate for the total survey was 0.86. Estimates for the individual hypothesized subscales were 0.67 for diet and nutritional supplements, 0.79 for stress-reducing techniques, and 0.80 for traditional and ethnic medicines. The principal components analysis resulted in a two-factor solution with nine items that loaded heavily and uniquely on a factor conceptualized as stress and anxiety reduction and six items that loaded heavily and uniquely on a factor conceptualized as dietary and physical manipulation. The remaining five items (vitamins and minerals, prayer and spiritual healing, massage, reflexology, and aromatherapy) indicated moderate loadings on factors one and two and, thus, were interpreted as equivocal items.

CONCLUSIONS:

Preliminary data indicated that the instrument is reliable and valid. Additional work is needed to improve the range of items and to test the instrument with other populations.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:

Use of CAM by women with breast cancer is believed to be increasing. However, limited data exist on the frequency and predictors of its use in this patient population; therefore, reliable and valid instruments are needed to determine use. If nurses can determine which CAM therapies women are employing, nurses can educate patients with breast cancer on the safe use of these therapies.

PMID: 12949594

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]