1. Observation on short and long-term effects of Tuina for treatment of infants eczema.

[Article in Chinese]

He YH, Kang J, Liu GZ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19947273

 

Source

Department of TCM, The People's Hospital of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan, China. hh.567@163.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To access the therapeutic effect of Tuina for treatment of infants eczema.

METHODS:

Two hundred and forty children with eczema were randomly divided into a Tuina group and a medication group, 120 cases in each group. The Tuina group was treated with Tuina on ten points using the thumb and middle finger, and the medication group was treated with oral administration of Chlorpheniramine and topical application of zinc oxide ointment or Youzhuoer ointment, etc. The therapeutic effects were evaluated after 3 weeks.

RESULTS:

The cured-markedly effective rate and total effective rate were 94.2% and 99.2% in the Tuina group and 98.0% and 100.0% in the medication group, respectively, the therapeutic effects were similar in the two groups (both P>0.05); 6 months after treatment, the recurrence rate of 3.8% in the Tuina group was significantly lower than 42.9% in the medication group (P<0.01), and there were no adverse reactions in the whole research process.

CONCLUSION:

Tuina on ten points for treatment of infants eczema has unequivocal short-term effect, a stable long-term effect, and low recurrence rate.

PMID: 19947273

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Anthroposophic therapy for children with chronic disease: a two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings.

Hamre HJ, Witt CM, Kienle GS, Meinecke C, Glockmann A, Willich SN, Kiene H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19545358

 

Source

Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Zechenweg 6, Freiburg, Germany. harald.hamre@ifaemm.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many children with chronic disease use complementary therapies. Anthroposophic treatment for paediatric chronic disease is provided by physicians and differs from conventional treatment in the use of special therapies (art therapy, eurythmy movement exercises, rhythmical massage therapy) and special medications. We studied clinical outcomes in children with chronic diseases under anthroposophic treatment in routine outpatient settings.

METHODS:

In conjunction with a health benefit program, consecutive outpatients starting anthroposophic treatment for any chronic disease participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcome was disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and caregivers' assessment on numerical rating scales 0-10). Disease Score was documented after 0, 6, and 12 months, Symptom Score after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months.

RESULTS:

A total of 435 patients were included. Mean age was 8.2 years (standard deviation 3.3, range 1.0-16.9 years). Most common indications were mental disorders (46.2% of patients; primarily hyperkinetic, emotional, and developmental disorders), respiratory disorders (14.0%), and neurological disorders (5.7%). Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 1.0-5.0 years). The anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (69.2% of patients), eurythmy therapy (54.7%), art therapy (11.3%), and rhythmical massage therapy (6.7%). Median number of eurythmy/art/massage therapy sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10-20), median therapy duration was 118 days (interquartile range 78-189 days).From baseline to six-month follow-up, Disease Score improved by average 3.00 points (95% confidence interval 2.76-3.24 points, p < 0.001) and Symptom Score improved by 2.41 points (95% confidence interval 2.16-2.66 points, p < 0.001). These improvements were maintained until the last follow-up. Symptom Score improved similarly in patients not using adjunctive non-anthroposophic therapies within the first six study months.

CONCLUSION:

Children under anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvement of chronic disease symptoms. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that anthroposophic therapies may play a beneficial role in the long-term care of children with chronic illness.

PMID:

19545358

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2713221

Free PMC Article

 

3. Towards evidence based medicine for paediatricians. Is cranio-sacral therapy useful in the management of crying babies?

Bradley E, Finlay F.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19542065

 

Source

Department of Community Paediatrics, Westgate House, Southmead Hospital, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS10 1NB, UK. emmalbradley@aol.com

PMID:

19542065

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Therapeutic effect of early applying hydrotherapy with Chinese drugs on children hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy].

[Article in Chinese]

Ma YZ, Zhai HY, Su CY.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19382472

 

Source

The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To observe the therapeutic effect of hydrotherapy with Chinese drugs (HT-C) in early intervention on children hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

METHODS:

HIE children were assigned to the treatment group and the control group, 50 in each, at random depending on the willingness of patients' parents. Both groups received the conventional functional training, according to the "0 -3-year-old early intervention outline", but for the treatment group, HT-C was applied additionally. Indexes for quality of sleep, gross motor function, severity of spasm and intellectual development were observed and compared before and after treatment to assess the therapeutic effects.

RESULTS:

Therapeutic effect in the treatment group was better than that in the control group in all the indexes observed, showing statistical significance (all P <0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Early intervention of HT-C could improve clinical symptom, promote the functional recovery and intellectual development in children HIE, and also could reduce or prevent the sequelae occurrence of the nervous system in them.

PMID: 19382472

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

5. Pediatric oncologists' views toward the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with cancer.

Roth M, Lin J, Kim M, Moody K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19262243

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. mroth@montefiore.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pediatric oncology patients commonly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), yet approximately only 50% of these patients discuss CAM with their oncologist.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to assess barriers to CAM communication in pediatric oncology.

DESIGN/METHODS:

A 33-question survey was sent via electronic mail to 358 pediatric oncologists in the United States.

RESULTS:

Ninety pediatric oncologists completed the survey. Ninety-nine percent of pediatric oncologists think it is important to know what CAM therapies their patients use. However, less than half of pediatric oncologists routinely ask their patients about CAM. This is primarily because of a lack of time and knowledge. Many physicians think some forms of CAM may improve quality of life, such as massage (74%) and yoga (57%). Over half of physicians thought that dietary supplements, herbal medicine, special diets, vitamins, and chiropractic might be harmful to patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric oncologists believe it is important to know which CAM therapies their patients use; however, they are not asking about them owing to lack of time and knowledge. To improve communication about CAM, increased physician education is needed. In addition, physicians should identify patients using potentially harmful CAM therapies. Furthermore, CAM research in pediatric oncology should focus on those modalities physicians believe may improve patient quality of life.

PMID: 19262243

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. A comparative study of nonpharmacological methods to reduce pain in neonates.

Mathai S, Natrajan N, Rajalakshmi NR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17202604

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, AFMC, Pune 411 040; and INHS Asvini, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India. sheilamathai@yahoo.com

Abstract

A randomized study was done to compare non pharmacological methods to reduce the pain of heel pricks in 104 stable term neonates. Non-nutritive sucking (NNS), rocking, massage, sucrose (20 percent), distilled water (DW) and expressed breast milk (EBM) were used as pain reducing agents. Duration of cry and Douleur Aiguë du Nouveau né (DAN) score were used to assess pain. Physiological parameters were also recorded before and after the stimulus. At 30 seconds after the stimulus, the pain scores were lowest in the sucrose group but this was not sustained at 1, 2 and 4 minutes. At 2 and 4 minutes pain scores were lowest in the NNS and rocking groups as compared to sucrose, distilled water, expressed breast milk and massage. The total duration of crying was also lowest in the NNS and rocking groups. Physiological parameters were comparable in all groups. Babies who were in Prechtl State 1 and 2 (sleeping) at the time of stimulus showed significantly lesser response to pain compared to babies who were awake. This was seen in all the intervention groups. In conclusion, our study suggests that rocking or giving a baby a pacifier are more effective non-pharmacological analgesics than EBM, DW, sucrose or massage for the pain of heel pricks in neonates. A calm or sleeping state before a painful procedure also appears to decrease crying and pain scores.

PMID: 17202604

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

7. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with cancer and general and specialty pediatrics.

Post-White J, Fitzgerald M, Hageness S, Sencer SF. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18936292

 

Source

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55403, USA. postw001@ umn.edu

Abstract

The objective of this survey is to determine the frequency, reasons, and factors influencing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in general and specialty pediatrics within the same geographic area. Of the 281 surveys completed, CAM use was higher in children with epilepsy (61.9%), cancer (59%), asthma (50.7%), and sickle cell disease (47.4%) than in general pediatrics (36%). Children most often used prayer (60.5%), massage (27.9%), specialty vitamins (27.2%), chiropractic care (25.9%), and dietary supplements (21.8%). Parents who used CAM for themselves (68.7%) were more likely to access CAM for their child. Most parents (62.6%) disclosed some or all of their child's use of CAM to providers. This study confirms that within the same geographic region, children with chronic and life-threatening illness use more CAM therapies than children seen in primary care clinics. Children with cancer use CAM for different reasons than children with non-life-threatening illnesses.

PMID: 18936292

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Complementary and alternative medicine for acute procedural pain in children.

Evans S, Tsao JC, Zeltzer LK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18780584

 

Source

Pediatric Pain Program, Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.

Abstract

Pain may cause physical and emotional distress in children experiencing medical procedures. Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies have become increasingly important in treating children's painful conditions, yet it is still unclear whether CAM has a place in acute pediatric pain analgesia. This review aims to present an overview of the available published evidence. Most research has examined the efficacy of hypnosis, which has emerged as useful in alleviating acute pain associated with a number of medical procedures. Music therapy also has gained some attention and for the most part shows promise in the pediatric acute pain setting. Acupuncture, laughter therapy, and massage also may prove beneficial. Despite the promise of many of these modalities, we conclude that further empirical research into safety and efficacy using well-designed studies and large samples is required before guidelines can be established. In addition, further work is needed in standardizing interventions, creating treatment manuals, and determining treatment efficacy as a function of the child's development, his or her individual characteristics, and the type of procedure the child is undergoing.

PMID: 18780584

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

9. Effectiveness of massage, sucrose solution, herbal tea or hydrolysed formula in the treatment of infantile colic.

Arikan D, Alp H, Gözüm S, Orbak Z, Cifçi EK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18592627

 

Source

Department of Child Health Nursing, School of Nursing, Atatürk University, 25240 Erzurum, Turkey. darikan@atauni.edu.tr

Abstract

AIM AND OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage, sucrose solution, herbal tea or hydrolysed formula, each used individually in the treatment of infantile colic.

BACKGROUND:

The term colic describes a group of symptoms that occur frequently in infants, consisting of paroxysmal abdominal pain and severe crying. Infant colic is of importance for both parents and the community health services that provide families with care, and is therefore an important clinical problem that is amenable to nursing interventions.

DESIGN:

This prospective and randomised-controlled study involved 175 infants in Turkey.

METHODS:

Data were gathered by using Wessel criteria; parents wrote a daily structured diary, recording the onset and duration of crying. Patients were assigned randomly into four different intervention groups (massage, sucrose solution, herbal tea and hydrolysed formula) and control group. Duration of crying following each intervention was recorded in the diary by parents for a one week period.

RESULTS:

There was a significant reduction in crying hours per day in all intervention groups. The difference between mean duration of total crying (hours/day) before and after the intervention infants in hydrolysed formula group was found higher than massage, sucrose and herbal tea group. The difference between mean duration of total crying(hours/day) before and after the intervention infants in massage group was found lower than other intervention groups and all groups.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings demonstrated that varied interventions such as administration of massage, sucrose solution, herbal tea and hydrolysed formula are effective in the treatment of colic. The difference between mean duration of total crying (hours/day) before and after the intervention in hydrolysed formula group was found higher than other intervention groups. Hydrolysed formula was the most effective in reducing the duration of crying (hours/day) when compared with the other intervention groups. Massage intervention yielded the least symptomatic improvement among all the interventions.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Colic treatment models used in this study can be used by nurses in neonatal and primary healthcare settings as an aid to families for the treatment of infantile colic.

Comment in

PMID: 18592627

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. How do parents of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) perceive their therapies?

Rouster-Stevens K, Nageswaran S, Arcury TA, Kemper KJ.

Source

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. krouster@wfubmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are commonly used by pediatric patients with chronic medical conditions. Little is known about parents' perceptions of these therapies. This study describes the views of parents of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) regarding conventional and CAM therapies.

METHODS:

Parents of children with JIA seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic were surveyed between June 1 and July 31, 2007. Questionnaires asked about patients' use of over 75 therapies in the past 30 days, their perceived helpfulness (0 = not helpful; 3 = very helpful), perceived side effects (0 = none; 3 = severe), and whether each therapy would be recommended to other patients with JIA (Yes, No, Not sure).

RESULTS:

Questionnaires were returned by 52/76 (68%) parents; patients' average age was 10.9 years and 87% were Caucasian. Medications were used by 45 (88%) patients; heat (67%) and extra rest (54%) were also commonly used. CAM therapies were used by 48 (92%), e.g., massage (54%), vitamins and other supplements (54%), avoiding foods that worsened pain (35%) and stress management techniques (33%). Among the therapies rated by 3 or more parents, those that scored 2.5 or higher on helpfulness were: biologic medications, methotrexate, naproxen, wheelchairs, orthotics, heat, vitamins C and D, music, support groups and prayer. CAM therapies had 0 median side effects and parents would recommend many of them to other families.

CONCLUSION:

JIA patients use diverse therapies. Parents report that many CAM therapies are helpful and would recommend them to other parents. These data can be used in counseling patients and guiding future research.

PMID: 18518962

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2424030

Free PMC Article

 

11. Use of complementary and alternative therapies by overweight and obese adults.

Bertisch SM, Wee CC, McCarthy EP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18451783

 

Source

Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Osher Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Suzanne_Bertisch@hms.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Obesity is associated with higher health-care costs due, in part, to higher use of traditional health care. Few data are available on the relationship between obesity and the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

We analyzed data on CAM use from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Alternative Medicine Supplement (n=31,044). We compared the use of CAM overall, within the past 12 months, between normal weight (BMI from 18 to <25), overweight (from 25 to <30), mildly obese (from 30 to <35), moderately obese (from 35 to <40), and extremely obese (>40) adults. For the primary analysis, our multivariable model was adjusted for sociodemographic factors, insurance status, medical conditions, and health behaviors. We performed additional analyses to explore the association of BMI and the use of seven CAM modalities.

RESULTS:

We found that adults with obesity have lower prevalence of use of yoga therapy, and similar prevalence of use of several CAM modalities, including relaxation techniques, natural herbs, massage, chiropractic medicine, tai chi, and acupuncture, compared to normal-weight individuals. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, insurance status, medical conditions, and health behaviors, adults with obesity were generally less likely to use most individual CAM modalities, although the magnitude of these differences were quite modest in many cases.

DISCUSSION:

Even though adults with obesity have a greater illness burden and higher utilization of traditional medical care, adults with higher BMIs were no more likely to use each of the individual CAM therapies studied. Additional research is needed to improve our understanding of CAM use by adults with obesity.

PMID:

18451783

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2776037

Free PMC Article

 

12. Effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety in children and adolescents.

Parslow R, Morgan AJ, Allen NB, Jorm AF, O'Donnell CP, Purcell R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18341460

 

Source

Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. rparslow@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders and situational anxiety in children and adolescents.

DATA SOURCES:

Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library for 111 treatments up to February 2006.

STUDY SELECTION:

There were 11 treatments for which intervention studies had been undertaken and reported.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Studies on each treatment were reviewed by one author and checked by a second. A consensus was reached for level of evidence.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Relevant evidence was available for bibliotherapy, dance and movement therapy, distraction techniques, humour, massage, melatonin, relaxation training, autogenic training, avoiding marijuana, a mineral-vitamin supplement (EMPower +) and music therapy. Findings from case-control studies, individual cohort studies or low quality randomised controlled trials indicated that several treatments may have potential to reduce anxiety, including bibliotherapy, massage, melatonin, and relaxation training.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although some complementary and self-help treatments might be useful for children and adolescents with anxiety, they need to be tested adequately through randomised controlled trials before they could be recommended.

PMID: 18341460

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

13. Integrative approaches to childhood constipation and encopresis.

Culbert TP, Banez GA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18061784

 

Source

Integrative Medicine Program, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55404, USA. timothy.culbert@childrensmn.org

Abstract

Constipation and encopresis (fecal soiling) are common childhood disorders that may lead to significant functional impairment. The etiology and course of constipation and encopresis are increasingly conceptualized from a broad biopsychosocial perspective, and therefore a holistic approach to assessment and treatment is indicated. Many children experience symptoms of chronic constipation and/or encopresis that are only partially responsive to conventional medical therapy. Complementary/alternative therapies can often help in the treatment of constipation/encopresis and are well accepted by patients and families.

PMID: 18061784

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Methods used to eliminate colic in infants in the eastern parts of Turkey.

Ciftçi EK, Arikan D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17973727

 

Source

Department of Child Health Nursing, Atatürk University Erzurum Health School, Erzurum, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Infant colic is a common problem characterized by excessive crying and fussing. There is not a consistent treatment method used to eliminate colic. Mothers make use of various models together to eliminate colic in their infants. This study was carried out to delineate the methods used by mothers to eliminate colic in their infants and to determine the efficacy of the various methods.

DESIGN:

Descriptive study.

METHODS:

The study was performed by visiting the homes of 186 babies (1-3 months of age) whose mothers had previously registered at a health center in Eastern Turkey between January 1 and February 28, 2005. Questionnaires and Wessel's criteria were used to obtain the data. The methods used by mothers to eliminate colic were classified as behavioral, natural, and drug treatments and were examined accordingly.

RESULTS:

According to mothers' statements, 75.8% of the babies had colic, while according to the Wessel criteria, 51.1% had colic symptoms. One hundred percent of the mothers used behavioral treatments, 66% used drug therapies, and 64.5% used natural treatment methods to eliminate colic.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mothers indicated that they achieved the most benefit from behavioral interventions, followed by natural therapies, and the least from drug treatments.

PMID: 17973727

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

15. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain.

Tsao JC, Meldrum M, Kim SC, Jacob MC, Zeltzer LK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17965769

 

Source

Pediatric Pain Program, Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, John C. Liebeskind History of Pain Collection, Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, UCLA and Department of History, UCLA USA.

Abstract

CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls) (mean age = 14.5 years +/- 2.4; range = 8-18 years) presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80%) were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy), pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

PMID: 17965769

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC1978240

Free PMC Article

 

16. Non-pharmacological methods for the treatment of pain in children and adolescents].

[Article in French]

Cunin-Roy C, Bienvenu M, Wood C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17931840

 

Source

Unité d'évaluation et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Robert-Debré, 48, boulevard Serrurier, 75019 Paris, France.

Abstract

This article deals with non-pharmacological methods for the treatment of pain in children and adolescents: acupuncture, homeopathy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, massage, relaxation, heat therapy, and hypnosis. These specialized techniques are used separately, either alone or in association with pharmacological methods. They have the specificity of considering the patient as a whole, including the biological and psycho-affective aspects. These methods are being developed more often, increasingly used but are still far from being systematic.

PMID: 17931840

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17. Non-pharmacological techniques for pain management in neonates.

Golianu B, Krane E, Seybold J, Almgren C, Anand KJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17905187

 

Source

Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. bgolianu@stanford.edu

Abstract

Significant progress in understanding the physiology, clinical correlates, and consequences of neonatal pain have resulted in greater attention to pain management during neonatal intensive care. A number of nonpharmacological therapies have been investigated, including nonnutritive sucking, with and without sucrose use, swaddling or facilitated tucking, kangaroo care, music therapy, and multi-sensorial stimulation. Although the efficacy of these approaches is clearly evident, they cannot provide analgesia for moderate or severe pain in the neonate. Further, some of these therapies cannot be effectively applied to all populations of critically ill neonates. Acupuncture, an ancient practice in Chinese medicine, has gained increasing popularity for symptom control among adults and older children. Acupuncture may provide an effective nonpharmacological approach for the treatment of pain in neonates, even moderate or severe pain, and should be considered for inclusion in a graduated multidisciplinary algorithm for neonatal pain management.

PMID: 17905187

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

18. Brief report: use of complementary and alternative medicine and psychological functioning in Latino children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis or arthralgia.

Zebracki K, Holzman K, Bitter KJ, Feehan K, Miller ML.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17626068

 

Source

Loyola University Chicago, Department of Psychology, IL 60626, USA. kzebrac@luc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its relationship to symptoms of anxiety, depression, and dysthymia in Latino children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) or arthralgia.

METHODS:

Parents of 36 children between the ages of 6 and 16 years with either JIA (n = 17) or arthralgia (n = 19) completed questionnaires during routine pediatric rheumatology clinic visits assessing use of CAM and psychological functioning.

RESULTS:

CAM was used by the majority of children primarily to treat pain episodes. The most common modalities were prayer and massage therapy. CAM use was associated with decreased symptoms of anxiety and dysthymia in children with arthralgia, but not in children with JIA.

CONCLUSION:

Preliminary findings suggest that CAM use is associated with improved psychological functioning in children with arthralgia. Healthcare providers are encouraged to routinely screen for CAM usage and to educate families about the potential benefits and limitations of CAM.

PMID: 17626068

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. Novel and alternative therapies for childhood constipation.

Liem O, Benninga MA, Mousa HM, Di Lorenzo C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17511919

 

Source

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Columbus Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. liemo@chi.osu.edu

Abstract

Constipation is a worldwide problem that affects many children. Treatment of constipation is largely based on clinical experience rather than on evidence-based controlled clinical trials. Stool softeners and cathartic agents in combination with behavioral interventions constitute the programs most commonly used to facilitate painless and frequent defecation. Long-term treatment is needed for most patients, and approximately 30% of children beyond puberty continue to struggle with symptoms of constipation, such as infrequent, painful evacuation of stools and fecal incontinence. Not surprisingly, chronicity of these bowel complaints may cause significant interference with the child's emotional growth and development. Development of new therapeutic strategies is necessary in order to treat these challenging patients more effectively. This review provides an overview of novel and alternative therapies, such as new drugs, surgery, and probiotics, that are being proposed for the treatment of childhood chronic constipation.

PMID: 17511919

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

20. Lifestyle, biomechanical, and bioenergetic complementary therapies in pediatric oncology.

McLean TW, Kemper KJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17022926

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA. tmclean@wfubmc.edu

Abstract

After the diagnosis of cancer in a child is made, many families complement conventional medical care with lifestyle changes including diet, exercise, environment, and mind-body therapies. Biomechanical, bioenergetic, and other therapies are also sometimes sought. These include massage, chiropractic, acupuncture/acupressure, therapeutic touch, Reiki, homeopathy, and prayer. Some of these complementary therapies have well-established roles in cancer therapy for children, whereas others are controversial and require more research.

PMID: 17022926

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

21. Effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression in children and adolescents.

Jorm AF, Allen NB, O'Donnell CP, Parslow RA, Purcell R, Morgan AJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17014404

 

Source

ORYGEN Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ajorm@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression in children and adolescents.

DATA SOURCES:

Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library for 131 treatments up to February 2006.

STUDY SELECTION:

There were 13 treatments that had been evaluated in intervention studies.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Studies on each treatment were reviewed by one author and checked by a second. A consensus was reached for level of evidence.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Relevant evidence was available for glutamine, S-adenosylmethionine, St John's wort, vitamin C, omega-3 fatty acids, light therapy, massage, art therapy, bibliotherapy, distraction techniques, exercise, relaxation therapy and sleep deprivation. However, the evidence was limited and generally of poor quality. The only treatment with reasonable supporting evidence was light therapy for winter depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Given that antidepressant medication is not recommended as a first line treatment for children and adolescents with mild to moderate depression, and that the effects of psychological treatments are modest, there is a pressing need to extend the range of treatments available for this age group.

PMID: 17014404

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

22. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with chronic medical conditions.

Samdup DZ, Smith RG, Il Song S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16998432

 

Source

Faculty of Health Sciences, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of this study were to examine whether progressive medical conditions lead to greater use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as compared with more stable conditions, to see whether disease severity influences CAM use, and to identify the main motivations behind CAM use.

METHODS:

Subjects were selected from outpatient clinics at Hotel Dieu Hospital. Surveys were conducted by mail and telephone. Medical diagnosis and severity were obtained from medical files. Statistical tests included chi, Kruskal-Wallis, and correlations.

RESULTS:

One hundred ninety-four children were surveyed. The "progressive" group included 15 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and 22 patients with cystic fibrosis. The "nonprogressive" group included 85 patients with cerebral palsy (CP), 49 with diabetes mellitus, and 23 with spina bifida. Twenty-three percent were using CAM. CP had the highest use; diabetes mellitus had the lowest. Popular therapies included massage and dietary/herbal remedies. Progressiveness had no impact on CAM use. Within the CP group, greater disease severity was associated with higher use (P < 0.001). The main reason for CAM use was to complement conventional medicine.

CONCLUSIONS:

Disease progressiveness had no impact on CAM use, but severity within the CP group did. Complementing conventional medicine was the main motive. Understanding the reasons and patterns of use of CAM is beneficial in efforts to improve the care of children with chronic medical conditions.

PMID: 16998432

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

23. Evaluating effects of aromatherapy massage on sleep in children with autism: a pilot study.

Williams TI.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16951722

 

Abstract

Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months) in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions.

PMID: 16951722

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC1513142

Free PMC Article

 

24. Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine and use among children in South Australia.

Smith C, Eckert K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16925541

 

Source

School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia. caroline.smith@acnhw.com.au

Abstract

AIM:

To determine the use of complementary and alternative medicines and therapies (CAM) and common treatment modalities in children.

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional, population-based survey of 2985 adult and 911 children aged 15 years or less, conducted in South Australia in Spring 2004. The outcome measures are CAM use in children in the previous 12 months.

RESULTS:

Overall, the 12-month prevalence of CAM use in children was 18.4% (95% confidence interval 15.9-21.0). A wide variety of CAM modalities were used by children including ingestible therapies (33%), chiropractic (34%) and massage (20%). Common reasons for use of CAM were to prevent illness or to maintain health (39%) and for musculoskeletal conditions (22%), respiratory problems (20%) and skin complaints (18%). There was little difference in the use of CAM treatment modality across child ages.

CONCLUSION:

Approximately one in five children used CAM in the past 12 months in South Australia. Our findings further highlight the importance of increasing public awareness about the need to inform doctors and primary health-care providers of CAM use in children. Health professionals working with children should ask parents about their children's use of CAM. There is a need for further research examining the safe and judicious use of CAM in children.

PMID: 16925541

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

25. Alternative therapies for children and youth with special health care needs.

Gasalberti D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16522492

 

Source

Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, 400 South Orange Ave., South Orange, NJ 07079, USA. gasalbde@shu.edu

PMID: 16522492

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

26. Chinese parent's use of nonpharmacological methods in children's postoperative pain relief.

He HG, Pölkki T, Pietilä AM, Vehviläinen-Julkunen K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16489954

 

Source

Department of Nursing Science, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland. honggu.he@uku.fi

Abstract

Parental participation in paediatric postoperative care is common in China. However, the knowledge is limited on what methods parents use to relieve their children's postoperative pain in hospital. The purpose of this study was to describe what nonpharmacological methods parents use to relieve their children's postoperative pain and factors related to this. A previously validated Scandinavian questionnaire survey was conducted in five provincial hospitals in Fujian, China, in 2004. Parents (n = 206) whose children had undergone operation were asked to complete questionnaires concerning nonpharmacological methods for children's pain relief. The response rate was 88%. Results show that the most commonly used methods by parents were emotional support strategies, helping with daily activities, distraction and imagery. Breathing technique was the method used least frequently. Fathers and parents who were older, more educated, employed and with earlier hospitalization experience with their children used pain alleviation methods more frequently than mothers and parents without these characteristics. Moreover, parents used some methods more frequently with boys, younger children, as well as children admitted for selective operations, with longer duration of hospitalization and with moderate or severe pain. Parents utilized various nonpharmacological methods for children's pain relief, especially those easy to use. This study may serve to focus healthcare providers' efforts on educating parents with respect to various nonpharmacological pain alleviation methods available for postoperative pain. Furthermore, this study provides parents an opportunity to be aware of their role in their children's pain management.

PMID: 16489954

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

27. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service: a survey.

Lin YC, Lee AC, Kemper KJ, Berde CB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16336482

 

Source

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. yuan-chi@tch.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities.

DESIGN:

A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs.

RESULTS:

Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey. Thirty-eight institutions (86%) offered one or more complementary and alternative medical therapies for their patients. Those therapies included biofeedback (65%), guided imagery (49%), relaxation therapy (33%), massage (35%), hypnosis (44%), acupuncture (33%), art therapy (21%), and meditation (21%).

CONCLUSIONS:

This report documents trends in complementary and alternative medical therapies usage in the tertiary pediatric pain management service. There is a high prevalence in the integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies in pediatric pain management programs. Additional clinical research in the safety and efficacy in complementary and alternative medical therapies for pediatric pain management is urgently needed.

PMID: 16336482

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

28. Treatment expectations for CAM interventions in pediatric chronic pain patients and their parents.

Tsao JC, Meldrum M, Bursch B, Jacob MC, Kim SC, Zeltzer LK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16322810

 

Source

Pediatric Pain Program, Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, CA 90024, USA. jtsao@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

Patient expectations regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions have important implications for treatment adherence, attrition and clinical outcome. Little is known, however, about parent and child treatment expectations regarding CAM approaches for pediatric chronic pain problems. The present study examined ratings of the expected benefits of CAM (i.e. hypnosis, massage, acupuncture, yoga and relaxation) and conventional medicine (i.e. medications, surgery) interventions in 45 children (32 girls; mean age = 13.8 years +/- 2.5) and parents (39 mothers) presenting for treatment at a specialty clinic for chronic pediatric pain. Among children, medications and relaxation were expected to be significantly more helpful than the remaining approaches (P < 0.01). However, children expected the three lowest rated interventions, acupuncture, surgery and hypnosis, to be of equal benefit. Results among parents were similar to those found in children but there were fewer significant differences between ratings of the various interventions. Only surgery was expected by parents to be significantly less helpful than the other approaches (P < 0.01). When parent and child perceptions were compared, parents expected hypnosis, acupuncture and yoga, to be more beneficial than did children, whereas children expected surgery to be more helpful than did parents (P < 0.01). Overall, children expected the benefits of CAM to be fairly low with parents' expectations only somewhat more positive. The current findings suggest that educational efforts directed at enhancing treatment expectations regarding CAM, particularly among children with chronic pain, are warranted.

PMID: 16322810

[PubMed]

PMCID: PMC1297505

Free PMC Article

 

29. Survey of complementary and alternative medicine use at a tertiary children's hospital.

Lim A, Cranswick N, Skull S, South M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16101976

 

Source

Department of General Medicine, University of Melbourne, and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. alissa.lim@rch.org.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within the Australian community is common. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of CAM usage in children attending a tertiary children's hospital.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional survey of children attending the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. Children were identified by consecutive acute admissions and attendance at outpatient clinics. A structured questionnaire with items about the use of CAM in the preceding year was administered by means of a face-to-face interview.

RESULTS:

Based on the 503 children surveyed, 51% reported CAM use in the preceding year. Forty-three percent had used at least one CAM medication. The most common medicinal CAM used were multivitamins, vitamin C, herbal remedies and homeopathic treatments. Non-medicinal CAM was used by 23% of the participants. The most commonly used therapies were chiropractic, naturopathy, aromatherapy, therapeutic massage and dietary restriction. The main reasons stated for CAM usage included promotion of general health and treatment of colds. Sixty-three percent of those reporting CAM use had not discussed this with their treating doctor.

CONCLUSION:

The use of CAM by children is common. Complementary and alternative medicine is particularly used for the treatment of common illnesses and conditions of childhood. Importantly, use is not always conveyed to treating physicians. Given the potential risk of adverse events associated with the use of CAM or interactions with conventional management, doctors should ask about their use as a part of routine history taking.

PMID: 16101976

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

30. Complementary therapies in pediatrics: a legal perspective.

Cohen MH, Kemper KJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15741385

 

Source

Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

Abstract

Increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies such as chiropractic, massage therapy, and herbal medicine, raises questions about the clinically appropriate use of CAM in pediatrics. Nonjudicious use of CAM therapies may cause either direct harm or, by creating an unwarranted financial and emotional burden, indirect harm. When advising patients concerning CAM therapies, pediatricians face 2 major legal risks: medical malpractice and professional discipline. Pediatricians can incorporate these considerations into advising and clinical decision-making about CAM therapies to address the best interest of the pediatric patient while helping to manage potential liability risk. This article provides a suggested framework, including asking the following questions: (1) Do parents elect to abandon effective care when the child's condition is serious or life-threatening? (2) Will use of the CAM therapy otherwise divert the child from imminently necessary conventional treatment? (3) Are the CAM therapies selected known to be unsafe and/or ineffective? (4) Have the proper parties consented to the use of the CAM therapy? (5) Is the risk-benefit ratio of the proposed CAM therapy acceptable to a reasonable, similarly situated clinician, and does the therapy have at least minority acceptance or support in the medical literature? Such an approach ideally can help guide the pediatrician toward clinical conduct that is clinically responsible, ethically appropriate, and legally defensible.

PMID: 15741385

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

31. Use of alternative therapies by patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department.

Losier A, Taylor B, Fernandez CV.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15769566

 

Source

Department of Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used by some patients to supplement their health care. Information on the use of CAM in children who are not chronically ill is sparse. We conducted a survey of caregivers presenting to a tertiary pediatric Emergency Department to determine CAM use in this population. Six hundred twenty questionnaires (77.6% of those distributed) were available for analysis. Approximately 13% of caregivers reported using CAM for their child. The most common CAM therapies used were homeopathy (20%), prayer/spiritual approaches (19.7%), and massage therapy (16.7%). Age of child greater than 1 year was associated with CAM use (p < 0.05), as was parental higher education (p < 0.0001). Income, ethnicity, parental age, and chronic illness were not correlated with CAM use. CAM therapies are infrequently used in pediatric patients presenting to the Emergency Department.

PMID: 15769566

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

32. 'Thinking outside the box': complementary and alternative therapies use in paediatric oncology patients.

Molassiotis A, Cubbin D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15003744

 

Source

School of Nursing, Midwifery & Health Visiting, University of Manchester, UK.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among children with cancer who had received or were receiving treatment at a large hospital in the UK, including the identification of the most commonly used therapies and parental motives for doing so. Using a cross-sectional survey design, questionnaires were sent to parents of paediatric patients diagnosed with cancer. Of the 49 respondents, 32.7% reported using some type of CAM. The most commonly used therapies included multivitamins, aromatherapy massage, diets and music as therapy. Most children had used more than one therapy. Many of the factors that motivated parents to use CAM were related to helping or supporting their child's medical treatment. The main benefits identified from using CAM included increased confidence, pain relief and relaxation. The longer the time since diagnosis the more children tended to use CAM. The reasons for parents not using CAM included the child doing well and therefore not seeing the need for CAM use; not being aware of CAM; CAM not being offered and lack of information available. Parents identified a need for more information to be available both at ward level and for information about CAM to be discussed by medical staff, particularly at the start of treatment. The results indicate that CAM is frequently used by children and young people with cancer and that their use plays a substantial role in helping children through their conventional cancer treatment.

PMID: 15003744

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

33. Multisensory intervention improves physical growth and illness rates in Korean orphaned newborn infants.

Kim TI, Shin YH, White-Traut RC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14689459

 

Source

Daejeon University, Daejeon, Korea.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multisensory intervention on the physical growth and health of Korean orphaned infants. Fifty-eight full-term infants were randomly assigned to a control (n = 28) or an experimental (n = 30) group within 14 days postbirth. In addition to receiving the routine orphanage care, infants in the experimental group received 15 min of auditory (female voice), tactile (massage), and visual (eye-to-eye contact) stimulation twice a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. Compared to the control group, the experimental group had gained significantly more weight and had larger increases in length and head circumference after the 4-week intervention period and at 6 months of age. In addition, the experimental group had significantly fewer illnesses and clinic visits. These data demonstrate that multisensory intervention in conjunction with human/social contact may be effective in facilitating growth for newborn infants placed in orphanages.

Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Res Nurs Health 26:424-433, 2003

PMID: 14689459

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

34. The use of complementary therapies in inner-city asthmatic children.

Braganza S, Ozuah PO, Sharif I.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14626339

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York 10467, USA. sandrafb@juno.com

Abstract

Use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has been increasing, especially among patients with a chronic illness. Although asthma is the most common chronic illness affecting children in the United States, very little is known about the use of CAM in children with asthma. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and correlates of CAM use among inner-city children with asthma. A cross-sectional survey of parents of children with asthma attending an urban health center was performed. Parents were surveyed regarding CAM use over the past year, perceived efficacy of CAM, severity of child's asthma symptoms and demographic information. Differences in proportions were tested by chi-square or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. Three hundred ten parents participated, of whom 61% were Hispanic and 37% were African American. Parental mean age was 33 years and the mean age of the child was 7.2 years; 89% of parents had treated their child in the past year with some form of CAM. However, only 18% had informed a physician of doing so. The most common forms of CAM used were as follows: prayers (53%), rubs (53%), and massage (45%). Of those who used CAM, 59% perceived it to be at least as effective as pharmacotherapy, and 44% used CAM as first treatment of an asthma attack. Mild and moderate persistent asthmatics had significantly higher rates of CAM use than did mild intermittent and severe persistent asthmatics. We found a very high rate of CAM use among children with asthma in this inner-city population. Most importantly, a very high proportion of parents perceived the therapies to be effective, used them as first treatment of an acute exacerbation, and did not inform a physician of doing so. These findings have implications for the care of asthmatic children by pediatricians practicing in urban settings.

PMID: 14626339

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]