1. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients attending a general otolaryngology clinic: can we afford to ignore it?

Shakeel M, Trinidade A, Jehan S, Ah-See KW.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20015757

 

Source

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. drshakeel@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is growing interest in use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among the general population. Little information is available, however, on CAM use in adults attending an otolaryngology outpatient clinic in the UK.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this article is to study the prevalence and pattern of CAM use among adult patients attending the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) clinic in a UK teaching hospital.

STUDY DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study was used.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

All patients on their primary visit to an ENT clinic were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire for a 14-week period from October 2005 to January 2006.

RESULTS:

Based on 1366 completed questionnaires, 53% (728/1366) were female and 47% (638/1366) were male. Twenty-nine percent (395/1366) were older than 60 years, and 56% (763/1366) were married. Twenty percent (275/1366) had a university education. Sixty-one percent (833/1366) had used CAM, almost 36% in the preceding 12 months. The popular remedies were cod liver oil (368/833), garlic (197/833), cranberry (181/833), aloe vera (176/833), primrose oil (174/833), and Echinacea (163/833). Nonherbal therapies included massage (230/833), acupuncture (186/833), aromatherapy (135/833), chiropractic (121/833), reflexology (119/833), and homeopathy (110/833). Seventeen percent (143/833) used CAM for their current illness. Only 8% (64/833) found CAM ineffective; yet, 57% (473/833) would recommend CAM to others. Fifty-one percent (421/833) failed to inform their primary physician of their CAM use.

CONCLUSION:

Despite concerns over CAM efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness, use of CAM is popular among patients attending an ENT clinic. Their use is not generally related to their presenting illness. Otolaryngologists should be aware of current trends in CAM use when managing patients, including possible interactions with other medication.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20015757

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Complementary and alternative medicine use by otolaryngology patients: a paradigm for practitioners in all surgical specialties.

Shakeel M, Trinidade A, Ah-See KW.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19771443

 

Source

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZN, Scotland, UK. drshakeel@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

There is growing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) amongst the general population. Little information is available on CAM use in otolaryngology patients in the UK. Despite concerns over safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness, CAM use is common amongst ENT patients. Patients perceive these medications as possible boosters to their immune system. It is becoming increasingly important that health care providers in all specialties ask their patients about CAM use and are aware of the implications it carries. The objective is to study the prevalence and pattern of CAM use among adult and paediatric ENT patients in a UK teaching hospital. A cross-sectional study was done by sending anonymous questionnaire to all outpatient and elective inpatients over a 3-month period. Response rate was 73% (1,789/2,440). Prominent demographics: female, married, over-50 s. Sixty percent had used CAM, 35% in last year. Most common herbs: cod liver oil (n = 481), garlic (n = 255), cranberry (n = 224); non-herbal: massage (n = 287), acupuncture (n = 233), aromatherapy (n = 170). Most commonly cited reasons for using CAM: general health, enhanced immunity and prevention/treatment of common illnesses like the common cold, asthma and bodily aches and pains.

PMID: 19771443

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Use of alternative medicine in Israeli chronic rhinosinusitis patients.

Yakirevitch A, Bedrin L, Migirov L, Wolf M, Talmi YP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19755095

 

Source

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. arkadiyak@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The worldwide interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been established in multiple surveys. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is often an unremitting disease with frequent troubling relapses, and despite wide use of endoscopic sinus surgery, conventional medicine may have a smaller contribution than expected. Because of prevalent use of CAM among patients, it is important that physicians acquire basic knowledge of this subject. We studied the prevalence of CAM use among CRS patients in Israel.

DESIGN:

Use of CAM was evaluated in a cohort of consecutive adult patients with CRS.

SETTING:

An outpatient clinic in a tertiary medical centre.

METHODS:

Patients were asked to fill out an anonymous questionnaire containing demographic data and data pertaining to allergy, traditional medical and surgical treatment use of CAM, and modalities used.

RESULTS:

Ninety patients were included. Nineteen of them (21%) reported CAM use. This included herbal medicine, vitamins, homeopathy, acupuncture, massage, reflexology, yoga, and chiropractics. There was a tendency, although not statistically significant, for patients with allergy and a history of sinus surgery to use CAM.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of CAM use among patients with CRS in Israel is high and may correlate with the presence of allergies and a history of sinus surgery.

PMID: 19755095

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. The root and development of otorhinolaryngology in traditional Chinese medicine.

Yap L, Pothula VB, Warner J, Akhtar S, Yates E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19597834

 

Source

Royal Albert Edward Infirmary, Wigan, UK. leesien@tiscali.co.uk

Abstract

There is an increasing trend in society to look beyond conventional medicine to find answers to problems in health. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the most popular alternative, complementary therapies worldwide. It is becoming a popular alternative in otorhinolaryngology where its use in the treatment of sinusitis, tinnitus, deafness and Meniere's disease is growing. Despite the general awareness of TCM, the literature relating specifically to otorhinolaryngology is relatively scarce. In this review, we have traced the origin and development of otorhinolaryngology with respect to TCM and have provided a few interesting insights into otorhinolaryngology, as it used to be practised. Archaeological sources have shown that diseases affecting the ear, nose and throat were of medical concern as early as the 18th century BC. The first practising otorhinolaryngologist can be traced back to the 5th century BC. Acupuncture, moxibustion, herbal therapy and massage were amongst his treatments. Otorhinolaryngology was recognised as a major specialty when formal medical education began in the 7th century AD. Therapeutic measures since then expanded to include exercise, food therapy and surgery. References to using oesophageal speech as a substitute voice generator, the use of copper wire to excise nasal polyps, procedures for removal of sharp foreign bodies in the oropharynx, repair of lacerated trachea and treatment of cancer of lips can be found in historical notes. In conclusion, from its primitive roots, TCM has developed into a distinct branch of health care system in China today that works alongside Western medicine.

PMID: 19597834

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Tinnitus: characteristics, causes, mechanisms, and treatments.

Han BI, Lee HW, Kim TY, Lim JS, Shin KS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19513328

 

Source

Do Neurology Clinic, Willis Medical Network, Daegu, Korea.

Abstract

Tinnitus-the perception of sound in the absence of an actual external sound-represents a symptom of an underlying condition rather than a single disease. Several theories have been proposed to explain the mechanisms underlying tinnitus. Tinnitus generators are theoretically located in the auditory pathway, and such generators and various mechanisms occurring in the peripheral auditory system have been explained in terms of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions, edge theory, and discordant theory. Those present in the central auditory system have been explained in terms of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the auditory plasticity theory, the crosstalk theory, the somatosensory system, and the limbic and autonomic nervous systems. Treatments for tinnitus include pharmacotherapy, cognitive and behavioral therapy, sound therapy, music therapy, tinnitus retraining therapy, massage and stretching, and electrical suppression. This paper reviews the characteristics, causes, mechanisms, and treatments of tinnitus.

PMID: 19513328

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC2686891

 

5. Complementary and alternative medicine use among patients undergoing otolaryngologic surgery.

Shakeel M, Newton JR, Ah-See KW.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19476768

 

Source

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB252ZN, UK. drshakeel@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may influence surgical care by inducing coagulopathies and interacting with other medication. We investigated the prevalence and pattern of CAM use in patients admitted to our department for elective otolaryngologic surgery.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Tertiary care referral centre in northeast Scotland.

METHOD AND PATIENTS:

All adult patients admitted for elective surgery, over a 14-week period from October 2005 to January 2006, were requested to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics using SPSS version 12 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

To establish the prevalence of CAM use in patients admitted for surgery in our unit. Secondary measures included the type of CAM used, indications for use, perceived benefit, and communication with the family physician.

RESULTS:

Sixty-three percent (177 of 285) of the patient group had used CAM-36% in the preceding year. Popular remedies were cod liver oil, garlic, aloe vera, cranberry, echinacea, primrose oil, herbal vitamin supplement, and St. John's wort. Nonherbal therapies included massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, aromatherapy, reflexology, yoga, homeopathy, and osteopathy. Nine percent used CAM for their admission illness. Only 8% (15 of 177) found CAM ineffective. Only 76 of 177 (43%) had discussed their CAM use with their family doctor.

CONCLUSION:

Despite concerns over its safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness, the use of CAM is common among patients undergoing otolaryngologic and head and neck surgery. This has implications for all health care workers involved in their care, in particular the anesthetist and the surgeon. A detailed history of CAM use by patients should be taken and documented during the preoperative clerking.

PMID: 19476768

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Immediate effects of 'voice massage' treatment on the speaking voice of healthy subjects.

Laukkanen AM, Leppänen K, Tyrmi J, Vilkman E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15914999

 

Source

Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Anne-Maria.fiLaukkanen@uta.fi

Abstract

'Voice massage' (VM) treatment includes manipulation of muscles related to speech production and voice and breathing exercises. This study investigated the effects of VM in 10 healthy subjects (5 females, 5 males). They recorded repetitions of the word 'paappa' at normal loudness and as softly as possible and read a text sample before and after 1-hour (1) VM treatment, (2) fast walking, (3) sitting in a library and (4) lying on a bed. Subglottic pressure was estimated from oral pressure during [p]. Transglottal flow and glottal resistance were measured. Voice production was studied with electroglottography. Fundamental frequency, sound pressure level (SPL) and alpha ratio [(SPL of the range 1-5 kHz) - (SPL of the range 50 Hz-1 kHz)] were calculated from text samples, which were also evaluated by 7 voice experts. A questionnaire was used to record subjects' sensations. Changes after lying and sitting suggest lowered effort in phonatory muscles, while after fast walking effort seemed to increase. After VM no significant changes were observed in voice parameters or perceptual quality, but ease of phonation and reduced tension in the neck, shoulders and back were reported. The effects of VM may be partly psychological, partly related to a search of phonatory balance.

PMID: 15914999

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. Nontraditional tools helpful in the treatment of certain types of voice disturbances.

Emerich KA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12923353

 

Source

National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 1245 Champa Street, Denver, CO 80204, USA. kemerich@dcpa.org

Abstract

Voice therapy has evolved considerably over the past decade. Our field has learned to draw from other disciplines to help facilitate the restoration of vocal function by implementing a more holistic approach and utilizing principles of motor learning to create our therapy programs. Clinicians have learned to recognize that the voice is more than just the larynx. Rather, it is a whole body system, and breakdowns in systems throughout the body can be responsible for vocal disturbances. This review will cover the nontraditional approaches that aid in treating certain voice disorders that often are not discussed in textbooks or classrooms. Facilitating techniques include principles from singing and acting voice production, Feldenkrais, Alexander technique, Qigong, and circumlaryngeal massage.

PMID: 12923353

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]