1. Comprehensive, integrative management of pain for patients with sickle-cell disease.

Yoon SL, Black S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17212571

 

Source

University of Florida College of Nursing, HPNP Complex, Gainesville, FL 32610-0187, USA. yoon@nursing.ufl.edu

Abstract

PURPOSES:

The study was conducted to: (1) investigate both pharmacologic and complementary therapies used for pain management by caregivers of children with sickle cell disease (SCD), (2) investigate the prevalence and types of complementary therapies used for pain management by caregivers of children with SCD, and (3) explore caregivers' interests in using complementary therapies in the future.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Sixty-three caregivers of children with SCD were asked to complete a questionnaire while they visited a SCD clinic. Chi-square tests were performed to compare demographic variables, examine use of pharmacologic therapies for pain management between age groups, and compare use of pharmacologic and complementary therapies.

RESULTS:

The most frequently used pain medications for children with SCD (mean age 9 years) were ibuprofen (37.5%), acetaminophen with codeine (32.1%), and acetaminophen with oxycodone (14.5%). More than 70% of 63 caregivers (mean age 33 years) were using some form of complementary therapies (3.67 +/- 2.95, range: 0-9) for their child. The most commonly used therapies were prayer, spiritual healing by others, massage, and relaxation. Complementary therapy use was significantly higher among caregivers of children who were taking two or more analgesics compared to children taking no analgesics or one analgesic (chi (2) = 3.954, p = 0.047). Although no difference was found in nonopioid analgesic use, there was significant difference in opioid analgesic use (chi (2) = 14.736, p = 0.002) and total medication use (chi (2) = 11.025, p = 0.012) between children < or = 12 years and > or =13 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Caregivers of children using greater numbers of conventional pain medications were more likely to be using complementary therapies as well. If offered in the future, many caregivers were willing to try various types of complementary therapies for pain management.

PMID: 17212571

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Pediatric patients with sickle cell disease: use of complementary and alternative therapies.

Sibinga EM, Shindell DL, Casella JF, Duggan AK, Wilson MH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16646728

 

Source

Division of General Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. esibinga@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Despite clinical advances, sickle cell disease (SCD) remains a difficult, chronic medical condition for many children and youth. Additional treatment strategies, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, would be welcome to enhance the clinical care of SCD patients. This study's objective was to identify CAM therapies that are currently used by families for children with SCD, and to investigate SCD families' interest in CAM.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Fifty-seven (57) parents of pediatric SCD patients participated in this cross-sectional telephone survey in early 2000. A SCD Severity Scale was developed by combining the general health assessment and four measures of SCD severity (Cronbach's alpha = 0.81).

RESULTS:

Fifty-four percent (54%) of the sample used CAM therapies for the SCD children. Forty-two percent (42%) used bioenergetic therapies (prayer, spiritual and energy healing), 28% used lifestyle/mind?body CAM (relaxation techniques, exercise, imagery, and diet), 12% used biochemical therapies (herbal medicines, megavitamins, and folk remedies), and 5% used biomechanical therapy (massage). CAM use for the SCD children was positively associated with the child's age, SCD Severity Scale score, respondent education, and respondent CAM use. The use of relaxation techniques was associated with greater SCD severity. Most respondents (83%) felt that CAM can be helpful.

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of CAM therapies is common for children with SCD. Prayer, relaxation techniques, and spiritual healing were the most commonly reported CAM therapies. Because clinical studies have shown the benefit of spiritual and relaxation practices for SCD and this study shows that these CAM therapies are being used commonly by SCD families, future research should focus on spiritual and relaxation practices for children with SCD.

PMID: 16646728

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Non-pharmacologic management of sickle cell pain.

Bodhise PB, Dejoie M, Brandon Z, Simpkins S, Ballas SK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15204105

 

Source

Bodhise Holistic Healing Group, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) suffer from both acute and chronic pain. The latter includes avascular necrosis of the hip joints mostly in the adult population. It has a negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals and is often associated with depression, disability, unemployment and dependence on opioid analgesics. In this study, we show that a non-pharmacologic approach to management with deep tissue/deep pressure massage therapy technique, including neuromuscular trigger point treatment with acupressure, in patients with SCD has a salutary effect on pain relief and quality of life.

Copyright 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd

PMID: 15204105

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]