1. Effects of mild-stream bathing on recovery from mental fatigue.

Mizuno K, Tanaka M, Tajima K, Okada N, Rokushima K, Watanabe Y.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20037494

 

Source

Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. mizuno@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bathing in hot water is very common in Japan; people bathe in order to clean their bodies and to recover from physical and mental fatigue. However, there have been few reports examining the effects of bathing on recovery from mental fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mild-stream bathing on recovery from mental fatigue.

MATERIAL/METHODS:

During mild-stream bathing, a mild stream continuously passes from the sole to the calf, thigh, waist and back, thus providing a massage function. In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover experiment, 14 male healthy volunteers were randomized into normal bathing and mild-stream bathing experiments. After a fatigue-inducing mental task for 4 hours, subjects took a normal or mild-stream bath.

RESULTS:

Heart rate was higher, muscle stiffness in the waist was lower and plasma cortisol levels tended to be lower after mild-stream bathing when compared to normal bathing. In addition, after mild-stream bathing, mental task performance, as assessed by reaction times on an advanced trail making test, was better than that after normal bathing.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present results suggest that improved working memory processing, diminished waist muscle tone, and attenuated mental stress are induced by mild-stream bathing. Therefore, mild-stream bathing appears to be more effective for alleviating mental fatigue than normal bathing.

PMID: 20037494

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Clinical observation on therapeutic effect of the pressing plantar reflex area with wooden needle for treatment of patients with insomnia].

[Article in Chinese]

Gong YL, Zhang YB, Han C, Jiang YY, Li Y, Chen SC, Liu ZY.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19994698

 

Source

Wulongbei Sanatorium, No. 230 Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Dandong 118005, China. wenquan.240@163.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the therapeutic effect of wooden needle on the patients with insomnia.

METHODS:

One hundred and twenty patients with insomnia were randomly divided into a wooden needle group and a western medicine group, 60 cases in each group. In the wooden needle group, the patients were treated with wooden needle to press the plantar reflex areas, such as cerebellar, throid and cerebral areas. In the western medicine group, Alprazolam was taken orally. Before and after treatment, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of both groups.

RESULTS:

The total therapeutic effect was 100.0% in the wooden needle group, while it was 90.7% in the western medicine group, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Compared with PSQI before and after treatment, there was difference in the both groups (All P < 0.01), but there was no difference between the two groups (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The therapeutic effect of wooden needle is similar to that of Alprazolam on the insomnia, indicats that wooden needle is a better therapy for treating insomnia.

PMID: 19994698

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Complementary medicine for the management of chronic stress: superiority of active versus passive techniques.

Lucini D, Malacarne M, Solaro N, Busin S, Pagani M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19887956

 

Source

Department of Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milano, Italy. daniela.lucini@ctnv.unimi.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent epidemiological data indicate that chronic stress is an important component of cardiovascular risk, implicitly suggesting that stress management might offer a useful complement to orthodox medical treatment and prevention of hypertension. In this context, information on mechanisms, such as subclinical increases in arterial pressure and sympathetic drive, is well documented. Conversely, evidence on methodologies and comparative efficacy needs to be improved. Accordingly, this study was planned to test the autonomic and subjective effects of two popular modalities of stress management.

METHODS:

We studied 70 patients complaining of stress-related symptoms, avoiding any potential autonomic confounder, such as established hypertension or drug treatment. Patients were divided in three groups: group I (n = 30) followed a breathing-guided relaxation training (active); group II (n = 15) an oriental massage, shiatsu (passive); and group III (n = 25) followed a sham intervention. Subjective effects of stress were assessed by validated questionnaires and autonomic nervous system regulation by spectral analysis of RR interval variability. Factor analysis was used to extract information simultaneously embedded in subjective and functional data.

RESULTS:

Although the problem of a greater quantity of treatment procedure in the active group than in the passive group existed, results showed that active relaxation, further to slightly reducing arterial pressure, might be more effective in relieving symptoms of stress and inducing an improved profile of autonomic cardiovascular regulation, as compared with passive massage or sham intervention.

CONCLUSION:

This active technique seems capable of beneficially addressing simultaneously the individual psychological and physiopathological dimensions of stress in clinical settings, with potentially beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk profile.

PMID: 19887956

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. A comparison of the effects of Voice Massage and voice hygiene lecture on self-reported vocal well-being and acoustic and perceptual speech parameters in female teachers.

Leppänen K, Laukkanen AM, Ilomäki I, Vilkman E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19590222

 

Source

Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Kirsti.Leppanen@uta.fi

Abstract

This study compared the effects of Voice Massage (VM) and a voice hygiene lecture (VHL) on 60 female teachers. VM is a Finnish massage method which treats muscles related to voice production. All subjects attended the VHL (3 h). Half of them were randomly assigned to the VM group, the other half received only VHL. VM was given 5 times in 1-hour sessions at intervals of 1-2 weeks. At the beginning and end of the autumn school term, before and after a working day, (1) a 1-min reading sample was recorded at both the subject's habitual loudness and loudly, (2) a prolonged phonation on [a:] was recorded at habitual speaking pitch and (3) a questionnaire on voice quality, ease or difficulty of phonation, and tiredness of the throat was completed. The reading samples were analysed for the fundamental frequency (F0), equivalent sound level (Leq) and alpha-ratio [Leq (1-5 kHz)-Leq (50-1,000 Hz)]. The vowel samples were analysed for the F0 and Leq, as well as for jitter and shimmer. The reading samples were also evaluated perceptually by 3 speech trainers. The mean F0 and difficulty of phonation increased from the beginning to the end of the term in the VHL group (p = 0.026, p = 0.007, respectively). In the VM group, the perceived firmness of loud reading decreased (p = 0.026). The results suggest that VM may help in sustaining vocal well-being during a school term.

Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 19590222

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety in children and adolescents.

Parslow R, Morgan AJ, Allen NB, Jorm AF, O'Donnell CP, Purcell R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18341460

 

Source

Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. rparslow@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders and situational anxiety in children and adolescents.

DATA SOURCES:

Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library for 111 treatments up to February 2006.

STUDY SELECTION:

There were 11 treatments for which intervention studies had been undertaken and reported.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Studies on each treatment were reviewed by one author and checked by a second. A consensus was reached for level of evidence.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Relevant evidence was available for bibliotherapy, dance and movement therapy, distraction techniques, humour, massage, melatonin, relaxation training, autogenic training, avoiding marijuana, a mineral-vitamin supplement (EMPower +) and music therapy. Findings from case-control studies, individual cohort studies or low quality randomised controlled trials indicated that several treatments may have potential to reduce anxiety, including bibliotherapy, massage, melatonin, and relaxation training.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although some complementary and self-help treatments might be useful for children and adolescents with anxiety, they need to be tested adequately through randomised controlled trials before they could be recommended.

PMID: 18341460

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

6. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies to promote healthy moods.

Kemper KJ, Shannon S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18061783

 

Source

Pediatrics and Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA. kkemper@wfubmc.edu

Abstract

Pediatric mood disorders (unipolar depression and bipolar disorder) are serious, common, persistent, and recurrent medical conditions. Depression is the second leading cause of illness and disability among young people worldwide. A healthy lifestyle and healthy environment are the cornerstones for promoting positive moods. In addition, several complementary therapies, including nutritional supplements, herbs, mind-body therapies, massage, and acupuncture can be helpful. The focus of this article is the fundamental lifestyle approaches and complementary therapies that enhance mental health in young people. Various resources are available to clinicians to help patients and families promote mental health.

PMID: 18061783

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2329575

Free PMC Article

 

7. Headache (chronic tension-type).

Silver N.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19454042

 

Source

The Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Liverpool, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) is a disorder that evolves from episodic tension-type headache, with daily or very frequent episodes of headache lasting minutes to days. It affects 4.1% of the general population in the USA, and is more prevalent in women (up to 65% of cases). METHODS AND OBJECTIVES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments for chronic tension-type headache? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for chronic tension-type headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to October 2005 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

RESULTS:

We found 38 systematic reviews, RCTs or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, amitriptyline, benzodiazepines, botulinum toxin, cognitive behavioural therapy, Indian head massage, mirtazapine, regular acute pain relief medicate

on, relaxation and electromyographic biofeedback, serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants, and tricyclic antidepressants (other than amitriptyline).

PMID: 19454042

[PubMed - in process]

 

8. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with chronic tension-type headache: results of a headache clinic survey.

Rossi P, Di Lorenzo G, Faroni J, Malpezzi MG, Cesarino F, Nappi G.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16643557

 

Source

Headache Clinic, INI Grottaferrata, Grottaferrata, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study was undertaken to evaluate the rates, pattern, and presence of predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use in a clinical population of patients with chronic tension-type headache.

BACKGROUND:

The use of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of headaches is a growing phenomenon about which little is known.

METHODS:

A total of 110 chronic tension-type headache patients attending a headache clinic participated in a physician-administered structured interview designed to gather information on complementary and alternative medicine use.

RESULTS:

Past use of complementary and alternative therapies was reported by 40% of the patients surveyed (22.7% in the previous year). Chronic tension-type headache patients prefer complementary and alternative practitioner-administered physical treatments to self-treatments, the most frequently used being chiropractic (21.9%), acupuncture (17.8%), and massage (17.8%). Only 41.1% of the patients perceived complementary and alternative therapies to be beneficial. The most common source of recommendation of complementary and alternative medicine was a friend or relative (41.1%). Most of the chronic tension-type headache patients used complementary and alternative treatment as a specific intervention for their headache (77.3%). Almost 60% of complementary and alternative medicine users had not informed their medical doctors of their use of complementary and alternative medicine. The most common reasons given for choosing to use a complementary or alternative therapy was the "potential improvement of headache" it offered (45.4%). The patients who had used more complementary and alternative treatments were found to be those recording a higher lifetime number of visits to conventional medical doctors, those with a comorbid psychiatric disorder, those enjoying a higher (household) income, and those who had never tried a preventive pharmacological treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that headache-clinic chronic tension-type headache patients, in their need of and quest for care, seek and explore both conventional and complementary and alternative therapies, even if only 41.1% of them perceived complementary treatments as effective. Physicians should be made aware of this patient-driven change in the medical climate in order to prevent misuse of health care resources and to be better equipped to meet patients' care requirements.

PMID: 16643557

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]