1.     Update on nonpharmacologic approaches to relieve labor pain and prevent suffering.

Simkin P, Bolding A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15544978

 

Source

pennyink@aol.com

Abstract

The control of labor pain and prevention of suffering are major concerns of clinicians and their clients. Nonpharmacologic approaches toward these goals are consistent with midwifery management and the choices of many women. We undertook a literature search of scientific articles cataloged in CINAHL, PUBMED, the Cochrane Library, and AMED databases relating to the effectiveness of 13 non-pharmacologic methods used to relieve pain and reduce suffering in labor. Suffering, which is different from pain, is not an outcome that is usually measured after childbirth. We assumed that suffering is unlikely if indicators of satisfaction were positive after childbirth. Adequate evidence of benefit in reducing pain exists for continuous labor support, baths, intradermal water blocks, and maternal movement and positioning. Acupuncture, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and hypnosis are promising, but they require further study. The effectiveness of childbirth education, relaxation and breathing, heat and cold, acupressure, hypnosis, aromatherapy, music, and audioanalgesia are either inadequately studied or findings are too variable to draw conclusions on effectiveness. All the methods studied had evidence of widespread satisfaction among a majority of users.

PMID: 15544978

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Complementary and alternative medicine in obstetrics.

Anderson FW, Johnson CT.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16168989

 

Source

Global Initiatives Program and Division of Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, L4000 Women's Hospital, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-00276, USA. fwja@med.umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify, survey and review randomized controlled studies of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for obstetric treatment or health promotion.

METHODS:

The MEDLINE database was searched to identify randomized controlled trials of CAM treatment and therapies in obstetrics. Studies examining modalities for treatment or improvement of health status were reviewed.

RESULTS:

Fifty-four articles assessing a variety of health modalities met the criteria for inclusion. Acupressure and ginger for prenatal nausea and vomiting, moxibustion for version of breech presentation, sterile water injections for back pain relief in labor, and perineal massage to prevent perineal trauma have three or more studies demonstrating beneficial effect. Other interventions have been studied less, and evidence for them is limited.

CONCLUSIONS:

Some CAM interventions have evidence of effectiveness for use in obstetric patients, while others require further investigation before they can be considered for use in practice.

PMID: 16168989

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

3.   Use of complementary and alternative medicine among women with depression: results of a national survey.

Wu P, Fuller C, Liu X, Lee HC, Fan B, Hoven CW, Mandell D, Wade C, Kronenberg F.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17325108

 

Source

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Dr., Unit 43, New York, NY 10032, USA. wup@childpsych.columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined patterns of and reasons for use of complementary and alternative therapies among women with depression, focusing in particular on three popular types of complementary and alternative therapies-manual therapies (for example, chiropractic treatments, massage, and acupressure), herbs, and vitamins.

METHODS:

The multiethnic sample consisted of 220 women with depression who were assessed as part of a nationally representative telephone survey of 3,068 women.

RESULTS:

Fifty-four percent of these women with depression reported past-year use of complementary and alternative medicine. African-American women were less likely to use complementary and alternative therapies in general, compared with non-Hispanic white women. Other factors significantly associated with use of complementary and alternative medicine in general included being employed, being single, and having self-perceived poor health. The relationships between the sociodemographic factors and use of each of the three individually examined types of therapies differed from their relationships with use of complementary and alternative medicine in general. Participants' most commonly cited reasons for use of these therapies were wanting treatments to be based on a "natural approach," wanting treatments to be congruent with their own values and beliefs, and past experiences in which conventional medical therapies had caused unpleasant side effects or had seemed ineffective.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is important for mental health and other health professionals to increase their own awareness of the types of complementary and alternative therapies that their patients may be using and to improve communication with their patients about the benefits and potential risks of these therapies.

PMID: 17325108

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

4. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among women in New York City: a pilot study.

Factor-Litvak P, Cushman LF, Kronenberg F, Wade C, Kalmuss D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11822614

 

Source

The Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study documents the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), among White, African American, and Hispanic/Latina women living in New York City. A pilot to a national survey of CAM use among American women, this study explores women's use of categories of CAM and various CAM practitioners, racial and ethnic differences in CAM use, and women's perceptions regarding the effectiveness of CAM. DESIGN AND LOCATION: Data were collected from women residing in New York City using random digit dialing/computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). The sample of 300 had equal numbers of women (n = 100) who self-identified as White, Hispanic/Latina, and African American, equally stratified by age (below and above age 40).

SUBJECTS:

Eligibility requirements included self-identification as Anglo/white, African American, or Hispanic/Latina and between ages 18 and 80.

MEASURES:

Three distinct categories of CAM were explored: (1) medicinal teas, homeopathic remedies, herbs, vitamins; (2) yoga, meditation, spiritual practices; and (3) manual therapies including chiropractic, massage, acupressure. Health concerns of interest were those frequently described in prior focus groups, and included reproductive health issues (e.g., pregnancy, menstruation, menopause) as well as other common women's health problems (e.g., heart disease, high blood pressure, headaches).

RESULTS:

More than half the sample has used a CAM treatment or remedy, and 40% have visited a CAM practitioner. Among users, half have used only one of the CAM categories, approximately one third have used two, and 16% used all three. The category of CAM used most often was medicinal tea/herbs/vitamins; the practitioners visited most frequently were chiropractors (18%) and nutritionists (17%). Racial and ethnic differences in CAM use were minimal, and approximately one third of all treatments used were rated "very effective" by users.

CONCLUSIONS:

Substantial utilization of CAM remedies and treatments for a variety of women's health concerns is observed. Further inquiry with larger samples of women is recommended.

PMID: 11822614

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Complementary and alternative medicine in obstetrics: a survey from Iran.

Fahimi F, Hrgovic I, El-Safadi S, Münstedt K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20730543

 

Source

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Klinikstrasse 32, 35385, Giessen, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This survey assessed the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods by obstetricians in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

METHODS:

Obstetricians in the province of Tehran were identified using the "Ketabe 118 Mashaghel" (2008), a source of medical department information. A survey on the use of CAM methods during childbirth and the reasons behind their application was conducted on site.

RESULTS:

CAM methods are by in 37.3% (62/166) of the obstetricians. Acupressure, massage, and phytotherapy were found to be the most frequently used methods. Use of CAM was influenced by the employment status of the midwives and inversely correlated with the number of deliveries in the hospital.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM methods are used in Iran to some extent. With evidence-based medicine in mind it is interesting to note that in Iran mainly CAM methods which already have some proven benefit are used.

PMID: 20730543

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

6. The uses of aromatherapy in women's health.

Tillett J, Ames D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20697241

 

Source

Midwifery and Wellness Center, Aurora Sinai Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233, USA. jackie.tillett@aurora.org

Abstract

Aromatherapy is the practice of therapeutic use of essential plant-based oils. Essential oils and aromatherapy have been used in the care of women for centuries. The published research has used small samples and often combines other complementary therapies with aromatherapy; however, the use of essential oils has not been shown to cause harm and is accepted by women. Aromatherapy mixtures are appropriate for use by nurses in labor and delivery settings. The article reviews the literature and discusses appropriate essential oil mixtures for use in women's health setting and labor and delivery.

PMID: 20697241

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in departments of obstetrics in croatia and a comparison to Germany.

Hrgovic I, Hrgovic Z, Habek D, Oreskovic S, Hofmann J, Münstedt K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20616518

 

Source

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This nationwide study assessed the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods in departments of obstetrics in Croatia and compared it with an identical assessment carried out in Germany.

METHODS:

All Croatian obstetrics departments were sent a questionnaire already tested in Germany which assessed the use of CAM methods: whether any were used during childbirth and if so how frequently, and the reasons behind their application.

RESULTS:

Questionnaires were returned by 100% (36/36) of departments identified. The only used CAM therapy was acupuncture, which was available in 5.6% (2/36) of the departments. All other methods (homeopathy, aromatherapy, massage etc.) were not used at all. Furthermore, acupuncture was only administered by physicians. These findings were found to strongly contrast with the findings from Germany.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among the main CAM methods only acupuncture is used to a small extent in the field of obstetrics in Croatia. Thus, the impression from the literature that shows a considerable use of CAM in this area definitely does not apply for all parts of the world. Future studies should seek to identify the reasons behind the intensive use of CAM in Germany and its virtual non-use in Croatia. This also means that analyses of CAM use are required with respect to perinatal outcome, the results of which could finally help decide about the reasonability of CAM.

2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 20616518

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

8. Effects of Gua-Sha therapy on breast engorgement: a randomized controlled trial.

Chiu JY, Gau ML, Kuo SY, Chang YH, Kuo SC, Tu HC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20220605

 

Source

Ben-Tang Nursing Home, Ben-Tang Charity Foundation, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast engorgement is a common problem that affects the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Limited solutions are available to relieve the discomfort associated with breast engorgement. Thus, further investigation of methods to achieve effective relief of symptoms is critical to promote breastfeeding success.

PURPOSE:

: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two breast care methods, that is, scraping (Gua-Sha) therapy (administered to the experimental group) and traditional breast care (i.e., massage and heating; administered to the control group).

METHODS:

A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 54 postpartum women at a Level III medical teaching hospital. Participant inclusion criteria included postpartum breastfeeding women (a) who had an uncomplicated delivery and (b) who were experiencing breast engorgement problems. The Gua-Sha protocol selected appropriate acupoint positions, which included ST16, ST18, SP17, and CV17. Each position was lightly scraped seven times in two cycles. For the control group, we used hot packs and massage for 20 min in accordance with recommendations given in an obstetrical technique textbook.

RESULTS:

Results showed no statistical differences between the two groups at baseline. Body temperature, breast temperature, breast engorgement, pain levels, and discomforting levels were statistically different between the two groups at 5 and 30 min after intervention (p < .001). The results of generalized estimating equation analysis indicated that, with the exception of body temperature, all variables remained more significant (p < .0001) to improving engorgement symptoms in the experimental group than those in the control group, after taking related variables into account.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

Our findings provided empirical evidence supporting that Gua-Sha therapy may be used as an effective technique in the management of breast engorgement. By using Gua-Sha therapy, nurses can handle breast engorgement problems more effectively in primary care and hence help patients both physically and psychologically.

PMID: 20220605

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

9. Effects of Koryo hand therapy on serum hormones and menopausal symptoms in Korean women.

Hye Sook Shin.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20220033

 

Source

Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea. suksh@khu.ac.kr

Abstract

Although previous studies have shown the effectiveness of Koryo hand therapy (KHT) in alleviating menopausal symptoms in middle-aged women, few studies have examined physiological data to evaluate the effect of KHT on menopausal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of KHT on biological markers such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E(2)), and self-reported symptoms. A two-group pre-post test design was used in the study. Data were collected from October 18 to December 25, 2006. The participants were 23 people in the experimental group and 21 people in the control group. The experimental group received KHT three times per week for a total of 8 weeks. Findings show that the levels of FSH and LH were significantly different in both groups, but levels of E(2) were statistically insignificant. The data support the hypothesis that KHT may have a role in reducing menopausal symptoms in the experimental group. KHT is effective in alleviating certain menopausal symptoms and affects the serum level of FSH and LH as shown by physiological evidence and participants' self-reported symptoms. Further studies are necessary to examine the effects of KHT through more objective data.

PMID: 20220033

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by women experiencing menopausal symptoms in Bologna.

Cardini F, Lesi G, Lombardo F, van der Sluijs C; MSCG - Menopause Survey Collaborative Group.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20187964

 

Collaborators (40)

Garavini CM, Manfredi M, Rinaldi L, Ricci A, Cutini MA, Gualandi V, Salerno S, Del Serto A, Ceroni I, Galletti B, Macrì E, Pasquini D, Siotto M, Opessi M, Stefanelli P, Santini P, Zuffrano M, Tonelli M, Fava B, Bernabei G, Dazzan C, Fattorini G, Gammi L, Ananias F, Bonavita B, Masi P, Teglio L, Selvetti M, Consort R, Ungaro F, Toscano M, Pluchinotta V, Mazzanti C, Tirelli S, Create P, Coppola P, Sganga E, Nascetti D, Fuschini G, Zucchell L.

Source

Health and Social Agency of Emilia Romagna Region, Bologna, Italy. cardinif@internetstudio3.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The present study describes Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use amongst Italian women transitioning through menopause. Popularity and perceived effectiveness of CAM treatments, use of pharmaceutical medications, characteristics of CAM users, the extent of communication between medical practitioners and women about their use of CAM, and variables associated with CAM use were also investigated.

METHODS:

Women, aged 45-65 years attending Family Planning and Women's Health clinics or Menopause Centres in Bologna were invited to complete a voluntary, anonymous, self administered questionnaire, which was used in a previous study in Sydney. The questionnaire was translated and adapted for use amongst Italian women. Data on general demographic and health characteristics, menopause related symptoms and the use of CAM and pharmaceutical treatments during the previous 12 months were collected.

RESULTS:

In total, 1,203 women completed the survey, of which 1,106 were included in the final sample. Of women who had symptoms linked with menopause and/or used remedies to alleviate symptoms, 33.5% reported to have used CAM. Among these, 23.5% had consulted one or more practitioners and 24% had used at least one CAM product.Approximately nine out of ten respondents reported medical practitioners did not seek information about their use of CAM; while one third of CAM users did not disclose the use of CAM to their physician. Nevertheless, medical practitioners were the most popular source of information. From the multivariate analysis, variables associated with CAM use were: professional employment, time since the last natural menses, use of CAM for conditions other than menopause, and presence of some severe symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

The relatively high prevalence of CAM use by women transitioning through menopause should encourage research initiatives into determining which CAM treatments are the safest and effective. The increasing and likely concomitant use of CAM with HRT and other pharmaceuticals underlines the need for the implementation of a surveillance system to report and monitor possible drug-herb adverse events. The discrepancy between women preferring to seek information about CAM from their medical doctor and the difficulties noted in communication between doctor and patient should encourage educational initiatives on CAM by health-care agencies and institutions.

PMID: 20187964

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2846842

 

11. Effect of Chinese medicinal massage on endocrinal function in women with climacteric syndrome].

[Article in Chinese]

Jin T, Han LJ, Shen YH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20073214

 

Source

Beijing Massage Hospital, Beijing, China. jintao1966@sina.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the therapeutic effect of Chinese medicinal massage with nourishing-Shen and activating-blood manipulation in treating women with climacteric syndrome and its influence on endocrinal function.

METHODS:

Sixty patients were assigned to two groups, the 40 patients in the treated group were treated by Chinese medicinal massage for 20 min once every other day; the 20 patients in the control group were treated by hormone replacement therapy with Premarin 0.625 g, once daily by oral taking. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated after two-month treatment by changes of serum levels of estradiol (E2), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinzing hormone (LH), and Kupperman index before and after treatment.

RESULTS:

Kupperman index showed that the total symptom score in the treated group was improved from 30.71 +/- 8.43 scores before treatment to 8.21 +/- 5.14 scores after treatment, with a decrement of 22.50 +/- 8.14 scores, which was higher than that in the control group, from 24.32 +/- 5.44 scores to 5.92 +/- 3.58 scores, with a decrement of 18.40 +/- 4.50 scores, the difference between them was statistically significant (t = 2.52, P = 0.014). The serum level of E2 increased in both groups significantly after treatment, from 20.23 +/- 20.78 ng/L to 54.34 +/- 24.26 ng/L in the treated group (t= -2.73, P = 0.006), and from 16.15 +/- 24.40 ng/L to 40.61 +/- 81.54 ng/L in the control group (t = -1.72, P = 0.086), but the difference between groups was statistical insignificant (t= -1.120, P = 0.263). As for levels of FSH and LH, their decrements in the control group (13.16 +/- 11.29 mlU/mL and 10.37 +/- 9.21 mlU/mL) were larger than those in the treated group (4.92 +/- 4.26 mlU/mL and 0.17 +/- 2.42 mlU/mL), respectively (t = - 2.49, P = 0.013; t = - 2.38, P = 0.017).

CONCLUSION:

Chinese medicinal massage manipulation could improve the Kupperman index of all the 13 symptoms in women with climacteric syndrome, and increase the E2 level in serum.

PMID: 20073214

[PubMed - in process]

 

12. Postnatal depression.

Craig M, Howard L.

Source

Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The differentiation between postnatal depression and other types of depression is often unclear, but there are treatment issues in nursing mothers that do not apply in other situations. Overall, the prevalence of depression in postpartum women is the same as the prevalence in women generally, at about 12-13%. Suicide is a major cause of maternal mortality in resource-rich countries, but rates are lower in women postpartum than in women who have not had a baby. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, and of non-drug treatments, for postnatal depression? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

RESULTS:

We found 34 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: group cognitive behavioural therapy, hormones, individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), infant massage by mother, interpersonal psychotherapy, light therapy, mother-infant interaction coaching, non-directive counselling, other antidepressants, physical exercise, psychodynamic therapy, psychoeducation with partner, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), St John's Wort, telephone-based peer support.

PMID: 19445768

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC2907780

Free PMC Article

 

13. Medical, surgical and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain in women: a descriptive review.

Vercellini P, Viganò P, Somigliana E, Abbiati A, Barbara G, Fedele L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19296329

 

Source

Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica I, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. paolo.vercellini@unimi.it

Abstract

Several causes of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) are recognised, but in many women a definite diagnosis cannot be made. Few randomised controlled trials on treatment of CPP have been conducted. In a Cochrane systematic review, only medroxy-progesterone acetate, counselling, a multidisciplinary approach and lysis of deep adhesions had a proven benefit. The aim of this descriptive review is to describe the management of CPP, which can focus on treating the pain itself, the underlying cause, or both. Combination drug therapy with medications with different mechanisms of action may improve therapeutic results. Pelvic denervating procedures should be indicated in selected circumstances, as the magnitude of the effect is undefined. Several alternative non-invasive treatments have been proposed including exercise programmes, cognitive and behavioural medicine, physical therapy, dietary modification, massage and acupuncture. When the woman has completed her family and particularly when pelvic varices have been demonstrated, hysterectomy can be considered after a careful pre-operative assessment. However, substantial pain relief may be achieved in no more than 60-70% of the cases. A minority of patients (3-5%) will experience worsening of pain or will develop new symptoms after surgery. Treatment of CPP, generally, requires acceptance of the concept of managing rather than curing symptoms.

PMID: 19296329

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Aromatherapy massage affects menopausal symptoms in korean climacteric women: a pilot-controlled clinical trial.

Hur MH, Yang YS, Lee MS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18830459

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Eulji University, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, School of Medicine, Eulji University and Department of Medical Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon,South Korea.

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05). There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05). These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

PMID: 18830459

[PubMed - in process]

PMCID: PMC2529395

Free PMC Article

 

15. Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea.

Zhu X, Proctor M, Bensoussan A, Wu E, Smith CA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18425916

 

Source

Chinese Medicine Program, University of Western Sydney, Center for Complementary Medicine Research, Bldg 3, Bankstown Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2750. x.zhu@uws.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine may be a suitable alternative.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (to 2006), MEDLINE (1950 to January 2007), EMBASE (1980 to January 2007), CINAHL (1982 to January 2007), AMED (1985 to January 2007), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library issue 4, 2006), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1990 to January 2007), Traditional Chinese Medicine Database System (TCMDS, 1990 to December 2006), and the Chinese BioMedicine Database (CBM, 1990 to December 2006) were searched. Citation lists of included trials were also reviewed.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

Any randomised controlled trials involving Chinese herbal medicine versus placebo, no treatment, conventional therapy, heat compression, another type of Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture or massage. Exclusion criteria were identifiable pelvic pathology and dysmenorrhoea resulting from the use of an intra-uterine contraceptive device.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Quality assessment, data extraction and data translation were performed independently by two review authors. Attempts were made to contact study authors for additional information and data. Data were combined for meta-analysis using either Peto odds ratios or relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data or weighted mean difference for continuous data. A fixed-effect statistical model was used, where suitable. If data were not suitable for meta-analysis, any available data from the trial were extracted and presented as descriptive data.

MAIN RESULTS:

Thirty-nine randomised controlled trials involving a total of 3475 women were included in the review. A number of the trials were of small sample size and poor methodological quality. Results for Chinese herbal medicine compared to placebo were unclear as data could not be combined (3 RCTs). Chinese herbal medicine resulted in significant improvements in pain relief (14 RCTs; RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.52 to 2.60), overall symptoms (6 RCTs; RR 2.17, 95% CI 1.73 to 2.73) and use of additional medication (2 RCTs; RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.93) when compared to use of pharmaceutical drugs. Self-designed Chinese herbal formulae resulted in significant improvements in pain relief (18 RCTs; RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.36), overall symptoms (14 RCTs; RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.40) and use of additional medication (5 RCTs; RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34 to 1.87) after up to three months of follow-up when compared to commonly used Chinese herbal health products. Chinese herbal medicine also resulted in better pain relief than acupuncture (2 RCTs; RR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82) and heat compression (1 RCT; RR 2.08, 95% CI 2.06 to 499.18).

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

The review found promising evidence supporting the use of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea; however, results are limited by the poor methodological quality of the included trials.

Comment in

Update of

PMID: 18425916

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

16. Documentation of self-care actions taken for somatic complaints by postmenopausal Malay women living in Kelantan Malaysia.

Dhillon HK, Mohd Zaki Nik Mahmood N, Singh H.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17913406

 

Source

Department of Obs. & Gyn., School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia. hardipkaur@ucsi.edu.my

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to document some of the self-care actions taken by women in Kelantan to manage their somatic symptoms associated with menopause.

METHOD:

A verified semi-structured questionnaire in the Malay language was administered to 326 naturally menopaused healthy women (mean age of 57.01+/-6.58 (S.D.) years) residing in Kelantan to determine the prevalence and types of self-care actions taken for their somatic complaints.

RESULTS:

Mean age at menopause was 49.4+/-3.4 (S.D.) years and 75% of these women were within the first 10 years of menopause. Of the four somatic symptoms, tiredness was the most prevalent followed by reduced level of mental concentration, musculoskeletal aches and pains, and backache. The prevalence of self-care actions was highest for backache (91%) and the lowest for reduced level of concentration (47.7%), and both prevalence and type of self-care action appear to depend upon the area of residence, and the educational level of the subject. Of those who took self-care actions, majority were from urban areas and with a higher educational level. Although HRT was used for all the four complaints, the use of pain relief tablets and traditional body massage was more commonly used for musculoskeletal aches and pains and backache than HRT. There was also a small fraction of women who had used the traditional herbs like 'akar kayu' and 'jamu' for these two complaints.

CONCLUSION:

It appears that the self-care actions used by postmenopausal women in Kelantan for their somatic complaints ranged from HRT to a combination of conventional, traditional, and alternative remedies. The fraction of women taking self-care action varied from symptom to symptom and the choice of self-care action also depended upon the education level, socio-economic status and place where the respondents were domiciled. There was a tendency for the more affluent and educated women to use more of the modern practices and slightly less of the traditional remedies whereas the rural women did the opposite. This is the first study of its kind in Kelantan documenting the self-care practices of menopausal women for their somatic complaints. Clearly more studies are needed to document these practices and the effectiveness of these self-care remedies.

PMID: 17913406

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17. Effects of aromatherapy massage on blood pressure and lipid profile in korean climacteric women.

Hur MH, Oh H, Lee MS, Kim C, Choi AN, Shin GR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17654092

 

Source

School of Nursing, Eulji University, Daejeon, South Korea.

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on the lipid profile and blood pressure in Korean climacteric women. A wait-listed control group, pretest-posttest design was used. The subjects comprised 58 climacteric women: 30 in the experimental group and 28 in the control group. Aromatherapy massage using lavender, rose geranium, rose, and jasmine was given to the experimental group only. Each massage session lasted 30 minutes, and was performed once weekly for two 8-week periods with self abdominal daily massage at home. The intervention produced significant differences in the systolic blood pressure compare to pretreatment and significant differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressures at posttreatment between the two groups. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage may exert positive effects on blood pressure. However, more objective, clinical measures should be applied in a future study with a randomized placebo-controlled design.

PMID: 17654092

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

18. Effect of aromatherapy massage on abdominal fat and body image in post-menopausal women.

[Article in Korean]

Kim HJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17615482

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Wonkwang Health Science College, Korea. jm8711@naver.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of aromatherapy massage on abdominal fat and body image in post-menopausal women.

METHOD:

A Non-equivalent control group pre-post test Quasi-experimental design of random assignment was applied. All subjects received one hour of whole body massage as treatment by the same researcher every week for 6 weeks. Participants also massaged their own abdomen two times everyday for 5 days each week for 6 weeks. The two groups used different kinds of oil. The experimental group used 3% grapefruit oil, cypress and three other kinds of oil. The control group used grapeseed oil. Data was collected before and after the treatment using Siemens Somatom Sensation 4, a tape measure and MBSRQ. Data was analyzed by ANCOVA using the SPSS/PC+Win 12 Version.

RESULT:

Abdominal subcutaneous fat and waist circumference in the experimental group significantly decreased after aromatherapy massage compared to the control group. Body image in the experimental group was significantly better after aromatherapy massage than in the control group.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that Aromatherapy massage could be utilized as an effective intervention to reduce abdominal subcutaneous fat, waist circumference, and to improve body image in post-menopausal women.

PMID: 17615482

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. Women's health during mid-life survey: the use of complementary and alternative medicine by symptomatic women transitioning through menopause in Sydney.

van der Sluijs CP, Bensoussan A, Liyanage L, Shah S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17202872

 

Source

CompleMED Research Centre, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. cpatchin@bigpond.net.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To survey the extent of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among women for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms.

DESIGN:

A total of 1,296 eligible women aged 45 to 65 years were recruited from three Sydney menopause clinics, general practice clinics, and government agencies between July 2003 and July 2004. Volunteers were invited to complete a 19-item questionnaire covering basic demographics, general health status, use of CAM therapies and products, use of pharmaceuticals, and sources of CAM advice.

RESULTS:

Of respondents, 53.8% had visited a CAM practitioner and/or used a CAM product during the past year, with 34% using a product only and 5% consulting a practitioner only. The most commonly visited practitioners were naturopaths (7.2%) and acupuncturists (4.8%), whereas the most popular products were soy (25.4%) and evening primrose oil (18.4%). Massage, chiropractic, and nutrition were rated the most effective therapies, and phytoestrogen tablets, evening primrose oil, and black cohosh were deemed the most effective products. Of the 59.9% of respondents currently using prescription or over-the-counter pharmaceuticals, 62.5% reported using CAM products during the past 12 months. Of CAM users 71% had informed their doctor about CAM use, whereas 26.4% of respondents reported their doctor had inquired about CAM use.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM use by women to alleviate menopausal symptoms is common, with several therapies perceived to be effective. Although a significant proportion of women may use CAM in conjunction with pharmaceuticals, relevant communication between medical practitioners and patients remains inadequate and may expose the patient to potential drug-herb interactions.

PMID: 17202872

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  

20. Effects of aromatherapy massage on anxiety and self-esteem in korean elderly women: a pilot study.

Rho KH, Han SH, Kim KS, Lee MS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17145679

 

Source

Research Institute of Nursing Science, College of Nursing Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on the anxiety and self-esteem experienced by Korean elderly women. A quasi-experimental, control group, pretest-posttest design was used. The subjects comprised 36 elderly females: 16 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group. Aromatherapy massage using lavender, chamomile, rosemary, and lemon was given to the experimental group only. Each massage session lasted 20 min, and was performed 3 times per week for two 3-week periods with an intervening 1-week break. The intervention produced significant differences in the anxiety and self-esteem and no significant differences in blood pressure or pulse rate between the two groups. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage exerts positive effects on anxiety and self-esteem. However, more objective, clinical measures should be applied in a future study with a randomized placebo-controlled design.

PMID: 17145679

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

21. Complementary and alternative medicine use among midlife women for reasons including menopause in the United States: 2002.

Brett KM, Keenan NL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17091097

 

Source

National Center for Health Statistics/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA. KBrett@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been examined previously for midlife women only in regional studies. The purpose of this study was to obtain national estimates of CAM use.

DESIGN:

Data were obtained from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey, which included a CAM supplementary questionnaire. The response rate was 74%. The analysis included 3,621 female respondents between 45 and 57 years of age who had answered all of the relevant questions. SUDAAN software was used to account for the complex sampling design.

RESULTS:

Forty-five percent of women 45 to 57 years of age had used some form of CAM within the last 12 months. Approximately 25% used biologics (e.g., herbs) or mind-body (e.g., biofeedback) modalities, whereas only 15% used body work (massage and chiropractic medicine). Use did not vary by age, but white race, higher education, and residence in the West were associated with increased use. Only 45% of CAM users mentioned its use to a medical provider. The most cited reason for using CAM involved treatment of pain, with only 3% mentioning menopause. However, the odds for use of CAM were almost twice as high for women with menopausal symptoms in the past year compared with women with no symptoms (odds ratio: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.6-2.2).

CONCLUSIONS:

CAM use among midlife U.S. women is high, although CAM is not used specifically for menopausal concerns. These data will be useful as a bench mark of the use of CAM as use of conventional menopause therapies are influenced by the Women's Health Initiative results.

PMID: 17091097

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

22. Effect of aromatherapy on symptoms of dysmenorrhea in college students: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Han SH, Hur MH, Buckle J, Choi J, Lee MS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16884344

 

Source

School of Nursing, Wonkwang Public Health College, Iksan, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of aromatherapy on menstrual cramps and symptoms of dysmenorrhea.

DESIGN:

The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

SUBJECTS:

The subjects were 67 female college students who rated their menstrual cramps to be greater than 6 on a 10-point visual analogue scale, who had no systemic or reproductive diseases, and who did not use contraceptive drugs.

INTERVENTION:

Subjects were randomized into three groups: (1) an experimental group (n = 25) who received aromatherapy, (2) a placebo group (n = 20), and (3) a control group (n = 22). Aromatherapy was applied topically to the experimental group in the form of an abdominal massage using two drops of lavender (Lavandula officinalis), one drop of clary sage (Salvia sclarea), and one drop of rose (Rosa centifolia) in 5 cc of almond oil. The placebo group received the same treatment but with almond oil only, and the control group received no treatment.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The menstrual cramps levels was assessed using a visual analogue scale and severity of dysmenorrhea was measured with a verbal multidimensional scoring system.

RESULTS:

The menstrual cramps were significantly lowered in the aromatherapy group than in the other two groups at both post-test time points (first and second day of menstruation after treatment). From the multiple regression aromatherapy was found to be associated with the changes in menstrual cramp levels (first day: Beta = -2.48, 95% CI: -3.68 to -1.29, p < 0.001; second day: Beta = -1.97, 95% CI: -3.66 to -0.29, p = 0.02 and the severity of dysmenorrhea (first day: Beta = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.57, p = 0.02; second day: Beta = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.56, p = 0.006) than that found in the other two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that aromatherapy using topically applied lavender, clary sage, and rose is effective in decreasing the severity of menstrual cramps. Aromatherapy can be offered as part of the nursing care to women experiencing menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea.

PMID: 16884344

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

23. Complementary and alternative medicine in obstetrics.

Anderson FW, Johnson CT.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16168989

 

Source

Global Initiatives Program and Division of Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, L4000 Women's Hospital, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-00276, USA. fwja@med.umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify, survey and review randomized controlled studies of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for obstetric treatment or health promotion.

METHODS:

The MEDLINE database was searched to identify randomized controlled trials of CAM treatment and therapies in obstetrics. Studies examining modalities for treatment or improvement of health status were reviewed.

RESULTS:

Fifty-four articles assessing a variety of health modalities met the criteria for inclusion. Acupressure and ginger for prenatal nausea and vomiting, moxibustion for version of breech presentation, sterile water injections for back pain relief in labor, and perineal massage to prevent perineal trauma have three or more studies demonstrating beneficial effect. Other interventions have been studied less, and evidence for them is limited.

CONCLUSIONS:

Some CAM interventions have evidence of effectiveness for use in obstetric patients, while others require further investigation before they can be considered for use in practice.

PMID: 16168989

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

24. Aromatherapy for outpatients with menopausal symptoms in obstetrics and gynecology.

Murakami S, Shirota T, Hayashi S, Ishizuka B.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15992235

 

Source

Green Flask Laboratory, Green Flask Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan. lab@greenflask.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To introduce Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) into a hospital department of obstetrics and gynecology with the goal of achieving integrative medicine, the authors investigated the effectiveness of aromatherapy for outpatients with menopausal symptoms.

LOCATION:

The department of obstetrics and gynecology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki, Japan.

DESIGN:

Participants in the aromatherapy trial received a 30 minute aromatherapy session performed by an aromatherapist that included a consultation, massage, and home care guidance. After they carried out approximately 1 month of home care, they received a second aromatherapy session. The patients' physical and mental health status was measured at the start and endpoint of the trial by use of the Kupperman index (KI), the self-rating depression scale, and consultation.

SUBJECTS:

Fifteen (15) outpatients (mean age, 54.3 +/- 7.4 years) with menopausal symptoms in the department of obstetrics and gynecology of St. Marianna University Hospital.

RESULTS:

The mean value of the KI score was significantly lowered after the aromatherapy trial from 31.4 +/- 6.8 to 22.9 +/- 6.1 (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

This investigation shows that aromatherapy could be effective as a CAM method for menopausal symptoms in the setting of a hospital obstetrics and gynecology department.

PMID: 15992235

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

25. Complementary therapy use by women's health clinic clients.

Pettigrew AC, King MO, McGee K, Rudolph C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15624349

 

Source

University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

While it is known that more women than men use complementary and alternative therapies, it is important to look at women who are pregnant or possibly receiving hormonal therapy, as side effects and consequences of these therapies may have a significant effect on their health status.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess women's knowledge, perceived effectiveness and use of 20 complementary and alternative therapies.

DESIGN:

Descriptive four-page questionnaire to obtain data on the use, reason for use, knowledge, perceived effectiveness, and sources of information of twenty complementary and alternative therapies.

SETTING:

Women's Health Center at a large Midwestern hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

A convenience sample of 250 women waiting to be seen by either a nurse midwife or obstetrician/gynecologist at an outpatient clinic.

RESULTS:

Sixty-nine percent of the participants used one or more complementary therapy. The most frequently used therapies included prayer, vitamins, massage, diet, and aromatherapy. The best predictor of use of each therapy was the participant's knowledge of the therapy. Participants generally rated the efficacy of the therapies higher than their knowledge level. Frequently cited sources of information were popular media and family. The least common information sources were nurse-midwives, drug stores, Internet, and other professional healthcare providers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women in this setting use complementary therapies at a rate greater than the general population. The participants obtained a great deal of their information about the therapies from popular press, media, friends, and family members rather than from licensed healthcare providers.

PMID: 15624349

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

26. Effectiveness of aromatherapy massage on abdominal obesity among middle aged women].

[Article in Korean]

Han SH, Yang BS, Kim HJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15314402

 

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Wonkwang Health Science College, Korea. shhan@wkhc.ac.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Objectives of the study is to examine the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage among middle aged women with abdominal obesity.

METHOD:

AB/BA crossover design of random blind assignment was applied. Aromatherapy and placebo massage were given to Group(A), Group(B), each groups applied each massages for 2 weeks alternatively. Weight, abdominal circumference and appetite were compared for results check among the subjects.

RESULT:

The apparent effectiveness of Aromatherapy Massage in reducing weight, abdominal circumference and appetite was noted.

CONCLUSION:

On the basis of results, they strongly support the facts of reduction of abdominal obesity by applying aromatherapy massage for middle aged women.

PMID: 15314402

[PubMed]