1. Biophysical characteristics of moxibustion.

[Article in Chinese]

Yang HY, Hu ZC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19994689

 

Source

College of Acupuncture and Massage, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai 201203, China. yhyabcd@sina.com

Abstract

In recent years, investigation focusing on biophysical characteristics of moxibustion results in advancement. The investigations aiming at elucidating the mechanism of maoxibustion from the angle of biophysics show that the effectiveness of moxibustion results not only from thermal effect, but also from the combine effects of spectral radiation, bio-thermal effect and non-thermal-bio effect. Currently, multi-discipline techniques are applied in research about biophysical characteristics of moxibustion which received broad attention. These researches show a good way and method to elucidating the mechanism of moxibustion; furthermore, they provid experimental evidence for the advancement in clinical practices and the research and design of imitating moxibustion instruments. This paper states the researches focusing on the effect of moxibustion on local body temperature, the infrared spectrum characteristics of moxibustion, bio-thermal effect and energy conversion of moxibustion, bio-heat transfer of moxibustion and microcirculation.

PMID: 19994689

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Effect of oxyhydromassage therapy on some physiological parameters.

[Article in Hungarian]

Malomsoki J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19144600

 

Source

Országos Orvosi Rehabilitációs Intézet, Budapest, Budaörsi út 30. 1118. szilvia.malomsoki@gmail.com

Abstract

The oxygen uptake of the living organism through the cardiorespiratory system is one of the most basic physiological procedures, and the capacity for the oxygen uptake is an important parameter of both the health and the performance of the living organism. During the past decade several experiments have been performed in order to elaborate a hyperoxygenisation method which avoids the respiratory system. The consumption of oxygen-rich mineral water and its application in hydromassage are also such methods. The combination of the two methods was applied on 57 overweight volunteers during a 3-week treatment period. Their average values were the following: body mass index 29.5+/-5.5; body fat rate 35.2+/-8.6%. The treatment was called oxyhydromassage. Before and after the treatment certain somatic parameters were determined, and also parameters which verify the fact of hyperoxygenisation. Data show that the average loss of body weight was 2.3+/-1.9 kg, and that the body fat rate and the body mass index also decreased. The average decrease of the body fat rate was 3.2+/-2.7%, while that of the body mass index was 0.7+/-0.5. Hyperoxygenisation occurred in 68-75% of the participants, while somatic changes in 79-83%. These results are significant at a 5% level. One can presume that due to the hyperoxygenisation effect the oxidative (aerobic) energy supply accelerated in the mitochondria of the muscular fibres, and this process contributed to the oxidation of fats, too. The authors found that hyperoxygenisation achieved by the oxyhydromassage treatment had several beneficial effects on most of the participants. Further therapeutic applications of the oxyhydromassage, especially if it is combined with other vasodilatation methods, e.g. biomagnetic method, can be of even greater importance.

PMID: 19144600

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Effects of Qigong exercises on 3 different parameters of human saliva.

Bayat-Movahed S, Shayesteh Y, Mehrizi H, Rezayi S, Bamdad K, Golestan B, Mohamadi M. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19082797

 

Source

Sports Medicine Research Center, Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran. swt_f@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the effects of a Qigong program on various parameters of unstimulated saliva, including volume, pH and secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) level.

METHODS:

Twice a day from the beginning of Fall 2005, twenty-three healthy volunteers aged 22-24 did special Qigong exercises and massage of acupuncture points which stimulated the energy cycle and increased body water energy. The unstimulated saliva volume and pH were recorded every week in Spring (April, May, June) 2005 before the volunteers started to learn and exercise Qigong, and after Qigong intervention in Spring (April, May, June) 2006. During the period of study, saliva was collected in the same location and on similar dates at the Dental Faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The S-IgA levels of the last samples of the last week of Spring 2005 and 2006 were measured.

RESULTS:

The unstimulated saliva volume after Qigong exercises (2.94 + or - 0.20 mL/5min) was significantly higher as compared to the pre-Qigong phase (1.65 + or -0.102 mL/5min, P<0.05). The S-IgA level was 105.45 + or - 9.41 mg/mL before doing Qigong exercises, and 156.23 + or - 88.56 mg/mL after doing Qigong exercises, and a statistically significant difference was seen between the two measurements (P=0.005). The change in pH was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

The application of Qigong is beneficial for increasing salivary volume and other parameters. Moreover, the results suggest that Qigong may be a useful medication for patients with salivary hyposecretion. Further research is recommended in examining the long-term effects of Qigong on improving salivary volume and other parameters in individuals with salivary hyposecretion.

PMID: 19082797

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Differences between the physiologic and psychologic effects of aromatherapy body treatment.

Takeda H, Tsujita J, Kaya M, Takemura M, Oku Y.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18637761

 

Source

Department of Physiology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The wide use of herbal plants and essential oils for the prevention and treatment of diseases dates back to ancient times. However, the scientific basis for the beneficial effects of such plants and oils has not been precisely clarified.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of aromatherapy body treatment on healthy subjects.

DESIGN:

We compared the physiologic and psychologic effects of aromatherapy body treatment (E), massage treatment with carrier oil alone (C), and rest in healthy adults.

SUBJECTS:

Seven (7) female and 6 male volunteers participated as subjects.

INTERVENTIONS:

Each subject underwent 3 trials, in which the Advanced Trail Making Test (ATMT) was given as a stress-inducing task before and after 1 of 3 treatments.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The State Anxiety Inventory (SAI), the Visual Analog Scale, and the Face Scale were used to assess anxiety, feelings, and mood, respectively.

RESULTS:

After the treatments, the SAI score and the feelings of fatigue were decreased, the positive and comfortable feelings were increased, and mood improved significantly in C and E. Furthermore, significant declines in the feelings of mental and total fatigue were maintained even after the second ATMT in E. On the other hand, the cortisol concentration in the saliva did not show significant changes in any of the trials. Secretory immunoglobulin A levels in the saliva increased significantly after all treatments.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that massage treatments, irrespective of the presence of essential oils, are more advantageous than rest in terms of psychologic or subjective evaluations but not in terms of physiologic or objective evaluations. Furthermore, as compared to massage alone, the aromatherapy body treatment provides a stronger and continuous relief from fatigue, especially fatigue of mental origin.

PMID: 18637761

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Searching for CAM evidence: an evaluation of therapy-specific search strategies.

Pilkington K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17532740

 

Source

School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster, London, United Kingdom. k.pilkington@wmin.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this investigation was to explore the effectiveness of search strategies developed to identify trials of specific complementary therapies in a range of clinical conditions.

DESIGN:

All primary studies included in a series of systematic reviews were identified. An analysis of the original source of the study and search term(s) by means of which the study had originally been retrieved was carried out. Each study was then searched for in each of 6 databases (AMED, Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO). The proportion of studies located on each database was assessed and the indexing terms identified for each therapy were compared against the original search strategies.

RESULTS:

A total of 127 primary studies were identified from 35 systematic reviews. The number of studies on each therapy varied, but Cochrane CENTRAL listed the highest proportion for all therapies. No database listed all studies, and at least one unique study was listed on all databases except MEDLINE, whereas several studies were not found on any of the databases. Index terms were effective in locating studies on acupuncture, individual herbs, hypnosis, massage, and yoga. For the remaining therapies, use of text word search terms was important and particularly so for homeopathy, meditation, and reflexology. Variation in terminology for most of the therapies was encountered.

CONCLUSIONS:

The small numbers of studies preclude firm recommendations, but several potential challenges in searching for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) trials are highlighted. The findings suggest that a range of different sources is required for identifying relevant studies, particularly for certain therapies. The development of an optimum generic search strategy for each therapy is hampered by the variation in indexing of CAM studies. Possible optimum strategies are presented as a basis for discussion, and further testing of the effectiveness of these strategies is now a priority.

PMID: 17532740

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage.

Kuriyama H, Watanabe S, Nakaya T, Shigemori I, Kita M, Yoshida N, Masaki D, Tadai T, Ozasa K, Fukui K, Imanishi J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15937558

 

Abstract

This preliminary investigation compares peripheral blood cell counts including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD16(+) lymphocytes, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, hematocrit, humoral parameters including serum interferon-gamma and interleukin-6, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA). Psychological measures including the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) between recipients (n = 11) of carrier oil massage and aromatherapy massage, which includes sweet almond oil, lavender oil, cypress oil and sweet marjoram oil. Though both STAI and SDS showed a significant reduction (P < 0.01) after treatment with aromatherapy and carrier massage, no difference between the aromatherapy and control massage was observed for STAI and SDS. Aromatherapy, in contrast to control massage, did not significantly reduce RBC count or hematocrit. However, aromatherapy massage showed a significant (P > 0.05) increase in PBLs, possibly due to an increase in CD8(+) and CD16(+) lymphocytes, which had significantly increased post-treatment (P < 0.01). Consequently, the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.01). The paucity of such differences after carrier oil massage suggests that aromatherapy massage could be beneficial in disease states that require augmentation of CD8(+) lymphocytes. While this study identifies the immunological benefits of aromatherapy massage, there is a need to validate the findings prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

PMID: 15937558

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

PMCID: PMC1142199

Free PMC Article

 

7. Commonalities in the central nervous system's involvement with complementary medical therapies: limbic morphinergic processes.

Esch T, Guarna M, Bianchi E, Zhu W, Stefano GB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15173679

 

Source

Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Institute for General and Family Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Currently, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are experiencing growing popularity, especially in former industrialized countries. However, most of the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms as well as participating biological structures are still speculative. Specific and non-specific effects may play a role in CAM. Moreover, trust, belief, and expectation may be of importance, pointing towards common central nervous system (CNS) pathways involved in CAM.

MATERIAL/METHODS:

Four CAM approaches (acupuncture, meditation, music therapy, and massage therapy) were examined with regard to the CNS activity pattern involved. CNS commonalities between different approaches were investigated.

RESULTS:

Frontal/prefrontal and limbic brain structures play a role in CAM. Particularly, left-anterior regions of the brain and reward or motivation circuitry constituents are involved, indicating positive affect and emotion-related memory processing--accompanied by endocrinologic and autonomic functions--as crucial components of CAM effects. Thus, trust and belief in a therapist or positive therapy expectations seem to be important. However, besides common non-specific or subjective effects, specific (objective) physiological components also exist.

CONCLUSIONS:

Non-specific CNS commonalities are involved in various CAM therapies. Different therapeutic approaches physiologically overlap in the brain. However, molecular correspondents of the detected CNS analogies still have to be specified. In particular, fast acting autoregulatory signaling molecules presumably play a role. These may also be involved in the placebo response.

PMID: 15173679

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]