1. A review of recent reports on autism: 1000 studies published in 2007.

Hughes JR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627794

 

Source

Department of Neurology, University of Illinois Medical Center (M/C 796), 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Abstract

From 1000 studies published in 2007 on all aspects of autism, those that reached clear conclusions or included quantitative data were selected for this review. Possible etiologies include elemental metals, especially the inconsistent evidence regarding mercury from the vaccine preservative thimerosal, not used after 2001, and chromosomes and genes with the conclusion that autism has a complex genetic architecture. Also, various parental conditions are considered, as are many different abnormalities in the central nervous system, especially underconnectivity within the cortex. Furthermore, deficiencies in mirror neurons have been proposed, leading to the "theory of mind" explanation that autistic children tend to disregard others. In addition, various global deficiencies, like an increase in inhibitory synaptic transmission, are proposed. Characteristics of these children include selective (inward) attention; underresponsiveness; stereotyped repetitive motor behavior; increased head size, weight, and height; various cognitive and communicative disorders; and also epilepsy. Therapy has emphasized risperidone, but some atypical antipsychotic medications have been helpful, as have robotic aids, massage, hyperbaric oxygen, and music. Nearly every conceivable problem that a child could have can be observed in these unfortunate children.

Comment in

PMID:

18627794

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

2. Positive touch, the implications for parents and their children with autism: an exploratory study.

Cullen LA, Barlow JH, Cushway D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16005835

 

Source

School of Health and Social Science, Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Health, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK. l.powell@coventry.ac.uk

Abstract

The aims of this study were (1) to explore the experience of touch between parents and children with autism before, during, and after a Training and Support Programme (TSP), and (2) to develop a model of the process of touch therapy for this group of parents and children. Fourteen parents and their children agreed to take part in the study. Five of these parents withdrew. Reasons for withdrawal included personal circumstances and ill health. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews with parents before attending the TSP and Home Record Sheets completed by parents during the TSP. Results indicate that before the TSP touch was experienced as out of parents' control. During the TSP, the experience of touch appeared to change. A key benefit gained by parents was the feeling of closeness to children. The key benefits gained by children were perceived by the parents as improved sleep patterns, children were more relaxed after receiving the massage and appeared more amenable to touch. Of interest was children's request for massage at home. At 16-week follow-up both parents and children continue to enjoy giving and receiving touch therapy, respectively.

PMID: 16005835

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

3. Exploring a massage intervention for parents and their children with autism: the implications for bonding and attachment.

Cullen-Powell LA, Barlow JH, Cushway D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16275663

 

Source

Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Health, Coventry University. l.powell@coventry.ac.uk

Abstract

This exploratory study aimed to address two questions: (1) What does touch mean between parents and their children with autism on completion of a massage intervention? (2) Do parents feel that their relationship with their children has changed on completion of a massage intervention? Fourteen parents agreed to be interviewed. Data were collected before the massage intervention (baseline), immediately after the massage intervention and 16 weeks from baseline and were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. At baseline, parents felt distressed that they felt unable to get 'close' to their children. After the intervention, parents reported feeling physically and emotionally closer to their children. Children expressed a range of cues to initiate massage at home. These benefits were maintained at follow-up for parents who continued to use massage at home. In conclusion, giving massage to children with autism may help to enhance the emotional bond between parent and child.

PMID: 16275663

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Massage therapy improves mood and behavior of students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Khilnani S, Field T, Hernandez-Reif M, Schanberg S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15053490

 

Source

Touch Research Institutes, University of Miami School of Medicine, Florida 33101, USA.

Abstract

In the present study, 30 students between the ages of 7 and 18 years (M = 13 years) diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were randomly assigned to a massage group or a wait-list control group. The massage group received massage therapy for 20 minutes twice per week over the course of one month. The results revealed that massage therapy benefited students with ADHD by improving short-term mood state and longer-term classroom behavior.

PMID: 15053490

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]