1. Randomized multicenter feasibility trial of myofascial physical therapy for the treatment of urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes.

FitzGerald MP, Anderson RU, Potts J, Payne CK, Peters KM, Clemens JQ, Kotarinos R, Fraser L, Cosby A, Fortman C, Neville C, Badillo S, Odabachian L, Sanfield A, O'Dougherty B, Halle-Podell R, Cen L, Chuai S, Landis JR, Mickelberg K, Barrell T, Kusek JW, Nyberg LM; Urological Pelvic Pain Collaborative Research Network.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19535099

 

Source

Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois 60153, USA. mfitzg8@lumc.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We determined the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial designed to compare 2 methods of manual therapy (myofascial physical therapy and global therapeutic massage) in patients with urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We recruited 48 subjects with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome at 6 clinical centers. Eligible patients were randomized to myofascial physical therapy or global therapeutic massage and were scheduled to receive up to 10 weekly treatments of 1 hour each. Criteria to assess feasibility included adherence of therapists to prescribed therapeutic protocol as determined by records of treatment, adverse events during study treatment and rate of response to therapy as assessed by the patient global response assessment. Primary outcome analysis compared response rates between treatment arms using Mantel-Haenszel methods.

RESULTS:

There were 23 (49%) men and 24 (51%) women randomized during a 6-month period. Of the patients 24 (51%) were randomized to global therapeutic massage, 23 (49%) to myofascial physical therapy and 44 (94%) completed the study. Therapist adherence to the treatment protocols was excellent. The global response assessment response rate of 57% in the myofascial physical therapy group was significantly higher than the rate of 21% in the global therapeutic massage treatment group (p = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

We judged the feasibility of conducting a full-scale trial of physical therapy methods and the preliminary findings of a beneficial effect of myofascial physical therapy warrants further study.

Comment in

PMID:

19535099

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2872169

Free PMC Article

 

2. How does the pre-massage and post-massage 2-glass test compare to the Meares-Stamey 4-glass test in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome?

Nickel JC, Shoskes D, Wang Y, Alexander RB, Fowler JE Jr, Zeitlin S, O'Leary MP, Pontari MA, Schaeffer AJ, Landis JR, Nyberg L, Kusek JW, Propert KJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16753385

 

Source

Department of Urology, Queen's University, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. jcn@post.queensu.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The Meares-Stamey 4-glass test is the standard method of assessing inflammation and the presence of bacteria in the lower urinary tract in men presenting with the chronic prostatitis syndrome. However, most urologists do not use it in daily practice because of the time and difficulty in performing it, as well as the additional expense. We evaluated a simpler test, the 2-glass pre-massage and post-massage test, and compared it with the Meares-Stamey 4-glass test to detect inflammation and bacteria in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study population included 353 men enrolled in the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Cohort study with baseline leukocyte counts and 2-day bacterial cultures on specimens obtained from a standard 4-glass test (VB1, VB2, expressed prostatic secretions, VB3). The chi-square test was performed to assess associations of white blood cell counts in expressed prostatic secretions and VB3. A receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed to determine the optimal cut point of white blood cells in VB3 in predicting white blood cells in expressed prostatic secretions. Sensitivity and specificity of VB3 cultures predicting expressed prostatic secretions and positive Meares-Stamey results were calculated from 2 x 2 contingency tables.

RESULTS:

Analysis of binary leukocyte outcomes (no white blood cells vs any white blood cells) suggests that white blood cells tend to be present in expressed prostatic secretions when there are any white blood cells in VB3, p <0.0001, the optimal cut point being white blood cell counts of 3 in VB3 (best predictive ability with area under ROC 0.771) to predict 5+ in expressed prostatic secretions with a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 70%. The optimal cut point of white blood cells in VB3 to predict 10 white blood cells in expressed prostatic secretions was 4 (62% sensitivity and 75% specificity). Uropathogens localizing to expressed prostatic secretions or VB3 confirms a positive 4-glass Meares-Stamey localization test. The sensitivity and specificity of a VB3 localizing culture only in predicting a positive Meares-Stamey 4-glass test result for any uropathogen were 44% to 54% (depending on definition) and 100%, respectively. The pre-massage and post-massage test predicted a correct diagnosis in more than 96% of subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

The value of localizing leukocytes and uropathogens to prostate specific specimens remains controversial in chronic heavily pretreated patients, but these data may help direct therapy (anti-inflammatory or antimicrobial) when obtained at first presentation. The pre-massage and post-massage test has strong concordance with the 4-glass test and is a reasonable alternative when expressed prostatic secretions are not obtained.

Comment in

PMID: 16753385

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]