1.    Depression, mood, stress, and Th1/Th2 immune balance in primary breast cancer patients undergoing classical massage therapy

Support Care Cancer. 2010 Jul 20. [Epub ahead of print]

Krohn M, Listing M, Tjahjono G, Reisshauer A, Peters E, Klapp BF, Rauchfuss M.

Source

Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany, michaela.krohn@charite.de.

Abstract

Purpose

Cancer patients frequently suffer from psychological comorbidities such as depression and elevated stress. Previous studies could demonstrate that cancer patients benefit from massage therapy on the physical and psychological level. This pilot study investigates the effects of massage on depression, mood, perceived stress, and the Th1/Th2 ratio in breast cancer patients.

Methods

Thirty-four breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to a massage group (n = 17) and a control group (n = 17). Patients of the massage group received two 30-min classical massages per week for 5 weeks. At baseline, at the end of the intervention period, and 6 weeks after the end of intervention, patients of both groups completed the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), and the Berlin Mood Questionnaire (BFS) and blood was withdrawn for determining cytokine concentrations and the Th1/Th2 ratio.

Results

Twenty-nine patients were included in the statistical analysis. Depression (PHQ) and anxious depression (BSF) were significantly reduced immediately after massage compared to the control group. Stress (PSQ) and elevated mood (BSF) did not show significant alterations after massage therapy. Changes of cytokine concentrations and Th1/Th2 ratio were insignificant as well, although there was a slight shift towards Th1 in the massage group over time.

Conclusions

Massage therapy is an efficient treatment for reducing depression in breast cancer patients. Insignificant results concerning immunological parameters, stress, and mood indicate that further research is needed to determine psychological and immunological changes under massage therapy.

PMID: 20644965

PubMed - as supplied by publisher

 

2.    Leg massage therapy promotes psychological relaxation and reinforces the first-line host defense in cancer patients

 

J Anesth. 2010 Dec;24(6):827-31. Epub 2010 Oct 26.

Noto Y, Kitajima M, Kudo M, Okudera K, Hirota K.

Source

Division of Health Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hirosaki 036-8564, Japan.

Abstract

Purpose

Patients with cancer suffer a wide range of physical symptoms coupled with psychological stress. Moreover, cancer chemotherapy induces immunosuppression and consequently causes respiratory infections. Massage therapy has been reported to reduce symptoms in cancer patients via an increase in psychosocial relaxation and to enhance and/or improve immune function.

Methods

In the present study, we determined whether leg massage could induce psychosocial relaxation and activate the first line of the host defense system. To assess effects of rest and leg massage, 15 healthy volunteers rested on a bed for 20 min on the first day, and 3 days later the subjects received a standardized massage of the legs for 20 min with nonaromatic oil. Twenty-nine cancer patients also received the same standardized massage of the legs. Anxiety/stress was assessed before and just after the rest or the massage using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and visual analogue scale (VAS). To evaluate oral immune function, salivary chromogranin A (CgA) and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels were measured.

Results

In healthy volunteers, rest significantly reduced VAS by 34% and increased sIgA by 61%. In contrast, leg massage significantly reduced both STAI-s and VAS by 24% and 63%, and increased both sIgA and CgA by 104% and 90%, respectively. In cancer patients, leg massage significantly decreased both STAI-s and VAS by 16% and 38%, and increased both salivary CgA and sIgA by 33% and 35%, respectively.

Conclusions

Leg massage may promote psychosocial relaxation and reinforce a first-line host defense with an increase in secretion of antimicrobial peptides.

PMID: 20976508

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

3.      Effects of acupressure therapy for patients having prolonged mechanical ventilation support

  J Adv Nurs. 2005 Oct;52(2):142-50.

Tsay SL, Wang JC, Lin KC, Chung UL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16164475

 

Source

Graduate Institute of Nursing, National Taipei College of Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan.

 

Abstract

Aims

This paper reports an investigation of the effects of acupressure therapy on dyspnoea, anxiety and physiological indicators of heart rate and respiratory rate in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease having mechanical ventilation support.

Background

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are using mechanical ventilation often experience dyspnoea and anxiety, which affects successful ventilator use.

Methods

The study had an experimental blocking design, using sex, age and length of ventilator use as a blocking factor. Qualified patients in two intermediate respiratory intensive care units were randomly assigned to an acupressure group and a comparison group. A total of 52 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in northern Taiwan participated. Those in the experimental group received daily acupressure therapy and massage treatment for 10 days. Patients in the comparison group received massage treatment and handholding. The primary outcome measures were the visual analogue scales for dyspnoea and anxiety, and physiological indicators of heart rate and respiratory rate. Data were collected every day from baseline (day 1), during the treatment (days 2-10) and follow-up (days 11-17). Data were analysed using generalized estimation equations. The study was carried out in 2003.

Results

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who were using prolonged mechanical ventilatory support experienced high levels of dyspnoea and anxiety. Dyspnoea (P = 0.009), anxiety (P = 0.011) and physiological indicators (P < 0.0001) in the acupressure group improved statistically significantly over time when compared with those of the comparison group.

Conclusions

This results support the suggestion that acupressure therapy could decrease sympathetic stimulation and improve perceived symptoms of dyspnoea and anxiety in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are using prolonged mechanical ventilation.

PMID: 16164475

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

4. Massage therapy for stress management: implications for nursing practice.

Labrique-Walusis F, Keister KJ, Russell AC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20664464

 

Source

Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, OH, USA.

Abstract

Unresolved stress has been shown to have numerous adverse effects on the body. A review of the literature has revealed 2 major themes: (1) research that argues that massage has a direct relationship with positive health outcomes and (2) research that stresses that although there are little or no measurable physiological changes that occur from massage, patients' perceptions of stress and anxiety were significantly reduced. The simple act of touch-focused care, even a simple 5-min hand or foot massage, can be useful in lowering a patient's perceived level of stress. Further research is necessary on the benefits and risks of implementing massage therapy in the hospital setting.

PMID: 20664464

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

5. Methodological challenges in conducting a multi-site randomized clinical trial of massage therapy in hospice.

Kutner J, Smith M, Mellis K, Felton S, Yamashita T, Corbin L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20597707

 

Source

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. jean.kutner@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

Researchers conducting multi-site studies of interventions for end-of-life symptom management face significant challenges with respect to obtaining an adequate sample and training and retaining on-site study teams. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategies and responses to these challenges in a multi-site randomized clinical trial (RCT) of the efficacy of massage therapy for decreasing pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care/hospice settings. Over a period of 36 months, we enrolled 380 participants across 15 sites; 27% of whom withdrew prior to study completion (less than the anticipated 30% rate). We saw an average of 68% turnover amongst study staff. Three key qualities characterized successful on-site study teams: (1) organizational commitment; (2) strong leadership from on-site study coordinators; and (3) effective lines of communication between the on-site study coordinators and both their teams and the university-based research team. Issues of recruitment, retention and training should be accounted for in hospice-based research study design and budgeting.

PMID: 20597707

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2938913

 

6. The effect of acupressure with massage on fatigue and depression in patients with end-stage renal disease.

Cho YC, Tsay SL.

Source

Department of Nursing, National Tainan Institute of Nursing.

Abstract

Fatigue and depressive mood are the most significant symptoms experienced by patients with end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acupressure with massage in fatigue and depression in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving hemodialysis treatment. The study applied an experimental pretest and posttest design. Sixty-two hemodialysis patients participated in the study. Data were collected from two hemodialysis clinics in major hospitals in southern Taiwan. Following consent to the study, subjects were randomly assigned to an acupressure group or a control group. Patients in the acupressure group received acupoint massage for 12 minutes per day, three days per week, for four weeks. Subjects in the control group only received routine unit care. The measures included the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, and Beck ' s Depression Inventory. Descriptive statistics, chi 2 tests, t-test and analyses of covariance were used for data analysis. The results indicate that subjects experienced a moderate level of fatigue. Nearly 65 % of hemodialysis patients had a depressed mood. ANCOVA results indicated that fatigue (F((1.54)) = 9.05, p =.004) and depression (F((1.54)) = 4.20, p =.045) among patients in the acupressure group showed significantly greater improvement than patients in the control group. The findings of this study provide an interventional model for nurses taking care of ESRD patients.

PMID: 15136963

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. Acupoints massage in improving the quality of sleep and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease.

Tsay SL, Rong JR, Lin PF.

Source

Graduate Institute of Nursing, National Taipei College of Nursing, Pei-tou, Taipei, Taiwan. sltsay@ntcn.edu.tw

Retraction in

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Traditional Chinese acupressure is a noninvasive technique that employs pressure and massage to acupoints in order to stimulate the balance of life energy that promotes health and comfort. Sleep disturbance is common in patients with end-stage renal disease but no intervention studies have addressed this problem. Aim. The purpose of the present study was to test the effectiveness of acupoints massage for patients with end-stage renal disease and experiencing sleep disturbances and diminished quality of life.

METHODS:

The study was a randomized control trial. A total of 98 end-stage renal disease patients with sleep disturbances were randomly assigned into an acupressure group, a sham acupressure group, and a control group. Acupressure and sham acupressure group patients received acupoints or no acupoints massage three times a week during haemodialysis treatment for a total of 4 weeks. The measures included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Sleep Log, and the Medical Outcome Study - Short Form 36.

FINDINGS:

The results indicated significant differences between the acupressure group and the control group in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index subscale scores of subjective sleep quality, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep sufficiency, and global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. Sleep log data revealed that the acupressure group significantly decreased wake time and experienced an improved quality of sleep at night over the control group. Medical Outcome Study - Short Form 36 data also documented that acupressure group patients experienced significantly improved quality of life.

CONCLUSION:

This study supports the effectiveness of acupoints massage in improving the quality of sleep and life quality of end-stage renal disease patients, and offers a noninvasive therapy for sleep-disturbed patients.

PMID: 12670382

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Acupressure and quality of sleep in patients with end-stage renal disease--a randomized controlled trial.

Tsay SL, Chen ML.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12550145

 

Source

Graduate Institute of Nursing, National Taipei College of Nursing, 365 Ming Te Road, Pei-Tou, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC. sltsay@ntcn.edu.tw

Abstract

The purpose of the study is to test the effectiveness of acupressure on sleep quality of end-stage renal disease patients. The study was a randomized controlled trial; qualified patients in the dialysis centers of four major hospitals were randomly assigned into an acupressure group, a sham acupressure group, and a control group. A total of 98 participants were included in the study. The main outcomes measured were the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and the sleep log. Data were collected at pretreatment and following treatment. Primary statistical analysis was by means of Analysis of Covariance, the Kruskal-Wallis Test and repeated measure ANOVA. The results indicated that PSQI scores of the acupressure group have a significantly greater improvement (p < 0.01) than the control group. However, there were no differences between the acupressure group and the sham group or the sham group and the control group (p > 0.05). Subscales of PSQI were further analyzed. Results demonstrated significant differences between the acupressure group and the control group in subjective sleep quality (p = 0.009), sleep duration (p = 0.004), habitual sleep efficiency (p = 0.001), and sleep sufficiency (p = 0.004). Significant differences in the subscale of subjective sleep quality (p = 0.003) between the sham acupressure group and the control group were also observed. Sleep log data showed that the acupressure group significantly decreased awake time and improved quality of sleep over time more than the control group (p < 0.01). The improvement could be seen as soon as the acupoints massage was implemented, and it was maintained through the post intervention.

Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

PMID:  12550145

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

9. A history of massage in nurse training school curricula (1860-1945).

Ruffin PT.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20682916

 

Source

The Center for Study of Complementary & Alternative Therapies at University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA. Ptr6w@virginia.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Guided by Florence Nightingale, massage nurse training instruction methods were duplicated in the U.S. nurse training curricula. In the 1880s to 1900s massage training and instruction was delivered by physicians, nurses, or masseurs for many disease conditions. In the 1930s to 1940s, influential nurse authors and educators began to recommend specialization in physiotherapy for nurses. Scientific and pharmacological solutions for symptoms of disease became popular, thus practicing basic nursing comfort measures using massage declined.

PURPOSES:

To trace roots of massage in the medical literature, the inclusion of massage in U.S. nurse training school curricula, and examine the historical shift from massage as a basic nursing comfort measure to a specialization of physiotherapy.

METHOD:

Primary text books by physicians, nurses, massage instructors; medical/nursing journals; nursing curriculum guidelines--archival collections of the Center for Historical Nursing Inquiry; Historical Collections at the University of Virginia Claude Moore Health Sciences Library; private historical collections; and secondary published books/ articles were used.

FINDINGS:

Prior to increase in scientific care, use of analgesics, and specialization of physiotherapy departments, the nurse provided basic comfort measures that included massage. Historical research in the use of massage in nursing may help refocus attention on the healing of the mind/body and reinforce the value of compassionate touch and balance in nursing practice today.

PMID: 20682916

[PubMed - in process]

 

10. Massage therapy for stress management: implications for nursing practice.

Labrique-Walusis F, Keister KJ, Russell AC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20664464

 

Source

Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, OH, USA.

Abstract

Unresolved stress has been shown to have numerous adverse effects on the body. A review of the literature has revealed 2 major themes: (1) research that argues that massage has a direct relationship with positive health outcomes and (2) research that stresses that although there are little or no measurable physiological changes that occur from massage, patients' perceptions of stress and anxiety were significantly reduced. The simple act of touch-focused care, even a simple 5-min hand or foot massage, can be useful in lowering a patient's perceived level of stress. Further research is necessary on the benefits and risks of implementing massage therapy in the hospital setting.

PMID: 20664464

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

11. To find inner peace: soft massage as an established and integrated part of palliative care.

Beck I, Runeson I, Blomqvist K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20081728

 

Source

School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University. ingela.beck@med.lu.se

Abstract

The aim of this study was to demonstrate how people with incurable cancer experienced soft massage in a palliative care setting in which massage was used as an established and integrated part of the nursing care. To reach a deep understanding of the experiences of receiving soft massage a qualitative method with a phenomenological approach was chosen. The study was based on interviews with eight patients in an advanced home care setting who had all received soft massage as part of their daily care. Soft massage was experienced by the informants as a way to find inner peace. During the massage the patients felt dignified, while memories from past massage sessions were about becoming free. These experiences of dignity and freedom brought hopes for the future. The conclusion is that soft massage ought to be offered in the ordinary palliative care. More research is needed to understand what is needed to integrate and establish methods such as soft massage in the palliative care.

PMID: 20081728

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

12. Understanding lymphoedema in advanced disease in a palliative care setting.

Todd M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20081719

 

Source

Specialist Lymphoedema Clinic, Glasgow, UK. marie.todd@ggc.scot.nhs.uk

Abstract

Lymphoedema in the palliative patient can be very distressing and uncomfortable, and managing this symptom is often difficult and labour intensive. Using a humanistic approach, the practitioner can holistically and sensitively assess the patient's needs and problems and develop a management strategy that ensures these needs are addressed. This requires a high level of skill in assessment, communication, collaborative working, and symptom management. The four basic principles of lymphoedema management are compression, massage, skin care and exercise. These principles are modified and applied on an individual patient basis through the support and collaboration of the team involved in each patient's care.

PMID: 20081719

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

13. Effectiveness of early physiotherapy to prevent lymphoedema after surgery for breast cancer: randomised, single blinded, clinical trial.

Torres Lacomba M, Yuste Sánchez MJ, Zapico Goñi A, Prieto Merino D, Mayoral del Moral O, Cerezo Téllez E, Minayo Mogollón E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20068255

 

Source

Physiotherapy Department, School of Physiotherapy, Alcalá de Henares University, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. maria.torres@uah.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of early physiotherapy in reducing the risk of secondary lymphoedema after surgery for breast cancer.

DESIGN:

Randomised, single blinded, clinical trial.

SETTING:

University hospital in Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

PARTICIPANTS:

120 women who had breast surgery involving dissection of axillary lymph nodes between May 2005 and June 2007.

INTERVENTION:

The early physiotherapy group was treated by a physiotherapist with a physiotherapy programme including manual lymph drainage, massage of scar tissue, and progressive active and action assisted shoulder exercises. This group also received an educational strategy. The control group received the educational strategy only.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Incidence of clinically significant secondary lymphoedema (>2 cm increase in arm circumference measured at two adjacent points compared with the non-affected arm).

RESULTS:

116 women completed the one year follow-up. Of these, 18 developed secondary lymphoedema (16%): 14 in the control group (25%) and four in the intervention group (7%). The difference was significant (P=0.01); risk ratio 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.10 to 0.79). A survival analysis showed a significant difference, with secondary lymphoedema being diagnosed four times earlier in the control group than in the intervention group (intervention/control, hazard ratio 0.26, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.79).

CONCLUSION:

Early physiotherapy could be an effective intervention in the prevention of secondary lymphoedema in women for at least one year after surgery for breast cancer involving dissection of axillary lymph nodes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Current controlled trials ISRCTN95870846.

Comment in

PMID: 20068255

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2806631


14. Physical therapy management of primary lymphedema in the lower extremities: A case report.

Greene R, Fowler R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20067355

 

Source

Howard University, Washington, DC, USA. ragreene@howard.edu

Abstract

Lymphedema is the tissue fluid accumulation that arises as a consequence of impaired lymphatic drainage. Lymphedema can result from either congenital (primary) or acquired (secondary) anomalies. Primary lymphedema affects 1-2 million people in the United States. Women are more affected by this disorder than men. The management of lymphedema by physical therapists usually includes a combination of skin care, external pressure, isotonic exercise, and massage. This case report describes the course of treatment for a 24-year-old female with stages 2 and 3 primary lymphedema. The goals of physical therapy intervention were as follows: 1) to reduce total limb girth circumference for both lower extremities; 2) to improve skin texture; 3) to promote independence with skin care to reduce the risk of infection; and 4) to facilitate independence with self-management. Following intervention, the patient met and exceeded all goals to decrease limb circumference. She had minimal fibrosis in the lower extremities, and she exhibited no signs and/or symptoms of infection. Decongestive lymphedema therapy was effective in treating this patient with primary lymphedema of the lower extremities. Continuous maintenance is required to ensure that the patient's limb size continues to reduce.

PMID: 20067355

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

15. Endocrinological evaluations of brief hand massages in palliative care.

Osaka I, Kurihara Y, Tanaka K, Nishizaki H, Aoki S, Adachi I.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19757975

 

Source

Division of Palliative Medicine, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan. i.osaka@scchr.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Some patients with advanced cancer make use of complementary therapies for the reduction of anxiety and stress. These patients can suffer distressing end-of-life symptoms, which conventional treatments might not relieve satisfactorily. Although previous studies have suggested that complementary therapies could be useful for reducing distress in patients with cancer, it has remained unclear whether these benefits are applicable at the end-of-life stage. The current study examined to validate salivary chromogranin A (CgA) as a biomarker for relieving stress by hand massage in terminally ill patients.

METHODS:

The study group comprised 34 inpatients in palliative care units. Each of these patients received a 5-minute massage to the upper extremity. Before and after the massage, saliva samples were collected in order to measure the CgA levels.

RESULTS:

The brief hand massage appears to reduce levels of stress according to the salivary CgA (p < 0.05). In addition, we found statistically significant changes in patient satisfaction with hand massage.

CONCLUSIONS:

Salivary CgA could potentially be used as a biomarker to measure relieving stress by hand massage in a palliative-care setting.

PMID: 19757975

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

16. Might massage or guided meditation provide "means to a better end"? Primary outcomes from an efficacy trial with patients at the end of life.

Downey L, Diehr P, Standish LJ, Patrick DL, Kozak L, Fisher D, Congdon S, Lafferty WE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19678461

 

Source

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

This article reports findings from a randomized controlled trial of massage and guided meditation with patients at the end of life. Using data from 167 randomized patients, the authors considered patient outcomes through 10 weeks post-enrollment, as well as next-of-kin ratings of the quality of the final week of life for 106 patients who died during study participation. Multiple regression models demonstrated no significant treatment effects of either massage or guided meditation, delivered up to twice a week, when compared with outcomes of an active control group that received visits from hospice-trained volunteers on a schedule similar to that of the active treatment arms. The authors discuss the implications of their findings for integration of these complementary and alternative medicine therapies into standard hospice care.

PMID:

19678461

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2858762

Free PMC Article

 

17. Tactile massage within the primary health care setting.

Andersson K, Törnkvist L, Wändell P.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19595417

 

Source

Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden. katarina.andersson5@comhem.se

Abstract

This paper describes an observational study describing how Tactile Massage (TM) was integrated into Swedish clinical medical care, the impact of this initiative suggests a foundation for future research. Subjects completed three questionnaires pre- and post-tactile massage. These were: Sense of Coherence (SOC), an enlarged Health Index (HI) and the Borg CR10 scale. RESULTS: A convenience sample of forty-three subjects (37 women and 6 men) were referred to TM treatment for a range of problems including for pain, sleep disorders, inability to move, headache and tense body. Patients received 10 TM treatments, each lasting approx. 1h in length. The enlarged HI questionnaire indicated that eleven out of fourteen parameters were significantly affected according (p-values between 0.0015 and <0.001). These included energy, mood, tiredness, sleep, pain, movement, health, general health and physical health. Pain reduction was also significantly reduced using the Borg CR10 scale (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: TM seems to affect several dimensions of health, and this should be explored more fully in future research.

PMID:

19595417

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

18. Inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in daily life: relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care.

Cronfalk BS, Strang P, Ternestedt BM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19583654

 

Source

Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@ki.se

Abstract

AIM AND OBJECTIVES:

This article explores relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a support supplement while caring for a dying family member at home.

BACKGROUND:

In palliative home care, relatives play an important role as carers to seriously ill and dying family members. To improve their quality of life, different support strategies are of importance. Complementary methods, such as soft tissue massage have become an appreciated supplement for these patients. However, only few studies focus on relatives experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a supplemental support.

DESIGN:

Qualitative design

METHOD:

Nineteen relatives received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times (25 minutes) in their homes. Open-ended semi-structured tape-recorded interviews were conducted once per relative after the nine times of massage, using qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS:

Soft tissue massage gave the relatives' feelings of 'being cared for', 'body vitality' and 'peace of mind'. For a while, they put worries of daily life aside as they just experienced 'being'. During massage, it became apparent that body and mind is constituted of an indestructible completeness. The overarching theme was 'inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in their daily lives'.

CONCLUSION:

All relatives experienced soft tissue massage positively, although they were under considerable stress. Soft tissue massage could be an option to comfort and support relatives in palliative home care.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

In palliative nursing care, soft tissue massage could present a worthy supplement in supporting caring relatives.

PMID:

19583654

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. Massage and mobilization of the feet and ankles in elderly adults: effect on clinical balance performance.

Vaillant J, Rouland A, Martigné P, Braujou R, Nissen MJ, Caillat-Miousse JL, Vuillerme N, Nougier V, Juvin R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19427810

 

Source

Laboratoire Santé Plasticité Motricité, Université Joseph Fourier-Grenoble 1, Grenoble, France. jvaillant@chu-grenoble.fr

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a session of plantar massage and joint mobilization of the feet and ankles on clinical balance performance in elderly people. A randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial was used to examine the immediate effects of manual massage and mobilization of the feet and ankles. Twenty-eight subjects, aged from 65 to 95 years (78.8+/-8.5 years - mean+/-SD) were recruited from community nursing homes. Main outcome measures were the performances in three tests: One Leg Balance (OLB) test, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and Lateral Reach (LR) test. Results demonstrated a significant improvement after massage and mobilization compared with placebo for the OLB test (1.1+/-1.7s versus 0.4+/-1.2s, p<0.01) and the TUG test (0.9+/-2.6s versus 0.2+/-1.2s, p<0.05). Conversely, performances in the LR test did not improve significantly. These results emphasise the positive impact of a single session of manual therapy applied to the feet and ankles on balance in elderly subjects.

PMID: 19427810

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

20. Three lessons from a randomized trial of massage and meditation at end of life: patient benefit, outcome measure selection, and design of trials with terminally ill patients.

Downey L, Engelberg RA, Standish LJ, Kozak L, Lafferty WE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19395701

 

Source

Department of Health Services, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ldowney@u.washington.edu

Abstract

Improving end-of-life care is a priority in the United States, but assigning priorities for standard care services requires evaluations using appropriate study design and appropriate outcome indicators. A recent randomized controlled trial with terminally ill patients produced no evidence of benefit from massage or guided meditation, when evaluated with measures of global quality of life or pain distress over the course of patient participation. However, reanalysis using a more targeted outcome, surrogates' assessment of patients' benefit from the study intervention, suggested significant gains from massage-the treatment patients gave their highest preassignment preference ratings. The authors conclude that adding a menu of complementary therapies as part of standard end-of-life care may yield significant benefit, that patient preference is an important predictor of outcome, and that modifications in trial design may be appropriate for end-of-life studies.

PMID: 19395701

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2855225

 

 

21. Managing lymphoedema in palliative care patients.

Todd M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19377392

 

Source

Lymphoedema Clinic, Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS Trust, Glasgow.

Abstract

The development of lymphoedema in advanced disease is distressing for patients and their carers and can prove difficult to manage for health-care professionals involved in their care. This article will provide an overview of co-morbidities that cancer patients face that will have an impact on the development, progression or management of lymphoedema. The principles of assessing and managing lymphoedema in palliative care patients is presented, based on the Scottish governments action plan Living and Dying Well. The need for collaboration with other members of the multi-disciplinary team to provide the seamless, patient-centred service advocated in this action plan is also presented.

PMID: 19377392

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

22. Massage and music therapy for relief of anxiety of cancer patients in palliative care

[Article in German]

Mantovan F, Rauter E, Müller I.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19348407

 

Source

Landesfachhochschule für Gesundheitsberufe "Claudiana", Uni Verona, Bruneck. franco.mantovan@claudiana.bz.it

Abstract

In palliative care between 13.9 and 25 percent of all patients suffering from cancer show signs of anxiety disorders. Up to 75 percent of these patients suffer from non-pathologic anxiety, which has a negative impact on the patients' quality of life. Therefore it is important to provide interventions that are able to reduce anxiety of cancer patients. Massage and music therapy are effective interventions for minimizing anxiety of cancer patients in palliative care. An empathic attitude of the nurse increases the effect of the mentioned interventions. While there is evidence of the interventions mentioned it is yet necessary to further explore these in additional clinical trials to consolidate the already existing results.

PMID: 19348407

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

23. The existential experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care--an intervention.

Cronfalk BS, Strang P, Ternestedt BM, Friedrichsen M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19184127

 

Source

Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@ki.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Soft tissue massage is currently used in palliative care for the relief of anxiety and pain. Only few studies have focused on patients' deeper experience of receiving the massage.

AIM:

The purpose of this study was to explore how patients with cancer in palliative home care experienced soft tissue massage.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Twenty-two patients received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times over a period of 2 weeks. Each session lasted for 25 min. Following the last massage session, a qualitative interview was conducted. The analysis was performed using a hermeneutic approach.

FINDINGS:

Soft tissue massage generated feelings of existential respite with perceptions of being released from illness for a while. Two categories constituted the basis of the experiences: (1) "an experience of thoughtful attention" and (2) "a sensation of complete tranquility" resulting in the overarching theme "A time of existential respite."

CONCLUSION:

The patients experienced the massage to give meaning and to be important as it generated feelings of an inner respite.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Soft tissue massage appears to be an appreciated source of support to dying patients in palliative home care. The method is easy to comprehend and relatively short (25 min) which may imply that it is a suitable complement in nursing care for this patient group.

PMID: 19184127

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

24. Massage therapy for cancer palliation and supportive care: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

Ernst E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19148685

 

Source

Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, 25 Victoria Park Road, Exeter EX2 4NT, UK. Edzard.Ernst@pms.ac.uk

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Massage is a popular adjunct to cancer palliation. This systematic review is aimed at critically evaluating all available randomised clinical trials of massage in cancer palliation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Six databases were searched to identify all trials of classical massage for cancer patients. Studies of other types of massage, e.g. reflexology, aromatherapy, were excluded. Fourteen trials met all inclusion criteria.

DISCUSSION:

Collectively, they suggest that massage can alleviate a wide range of symptoms: pain, nausea, anxiety, depression, anger, stress and fatigue. However, the methodological quality of the included studies was poor, a fact that prevents definitive conclusions.

CONCLUSION:

The evidence is, therefore, encouraging but not compelling. The subject seems to warrant further investigations which avoid the limitations of previous studies.

PMID: 19148685

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

25. Nurses' experiences of practicing the HeartTouch technique for one month.

Jelonek Walker M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19126880

 

Source

Lauterstein-Conway School of Massage, Austin, TX 78736, USA. walkerj@io.com

Abstract

Stress plays a significant role in almost every aspect of health. Appraisal (thoughts and feelings) of a situation determines the level of stress experienced.

PURPOSE:

To describe the nurses' experiences of practicing the HeartTouch (HRTT) technique, an internal tool designed to help nurses change their thoughts and feelings, especially in stressful situations.

METHOD:

After an education session discussing the effects of thoughts and feelings on stress and health, nurses learn HRTT. After practicing HRTT for 1 month during their daily life, 48 nurses answer 7 open-ended questions about their experience. Content analysis is used to analyze the data.

FINDINGS:

Nurses notice physical, mental, and emotional benefits for themselves, patients, colleagues, and family members. Nurses feel less stressed and experience an increased sense of control and ability to notice and change their thoughts and feelings. Nurses also discuss meaningful connections with self, others, and a Higher Power and greater work satisfaction.

PMID: 19126880

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

26. A randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a single session of nurse administered massage for short term relief of chronic non-malignant pain.

Seers K, Crichton N, Martin J, Coulson K, Carroll D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18601729

 

Source

RCN Research Institute, School of Health & Social Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. kate.seers@warwick.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Massage is increasingly used to manage chronic pain but its benefit has not been clearly established. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of a single session of nurse-administered massage for the short term relief of chronic non-malignant pain and anxiety.

METHODS:

A randomised controlled trial design was used, in which the patients were assigned to a massage or control group. The massage group received a 15 minute manual massage and the control group a 15 minute visit to talk about their pain. Adult patients attending a pain relief unit with a diagnosis of chronic pain whose pain was described as moderate or severe were eligible for the study. An observer blind to the patients' treatment group carried out assessments immediately before (baseline), after treatment and 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours later. Pain was assessed using 100 mm visual analogue scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain Relief was assessed using a five point verbal rating scale. Anxiety was assessed with the Spielberger short form State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.

RESULTS:

101 patients were randomised and evaluated, 50 in the massage and 51 in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups at baseline interview. Patients in the massage but not the control group had significantly less pain compared to baseline immediately after and one hour post treatment. 95% confidence interval for the difference in mean pain reduction at one hour post treatment between the massage and control groups is 5.47 mm to 24.70 mm. Patients in the massage but not the control group had a statistically significant reduction in anxiety compared to baseline immediately after and at 1 hour post treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Massage is effective in the short term for chronic pain of moderate to severe intensity.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

[ISRCTN98406653].

PMID: 18601729

[PubMed]

PMCID: PMC2533334

Free PMC Article

 

27. A one-day education in soft tissue massage: experiences and opinions as evaluated by nursing staff in palliative care.

Cronfalk BS, Friedrichsen M, Milberg A, Strang P.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18501049

 

Source

Research and Development Department, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@stockholmssjukhem.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Increasing awareness of well-being aspects of physical touch has spurred the appreciation for soft tissue massage (STM) as part of palliative care. Educational programs are available but with no specific focus on utilization for this kind of care. The aim was to study the feasibility of a 1-day course in STM in clarifying nursing staff's experiences and opinions, but also to shed light on their motivation and ability to employ STM in the care of dying cancer patients.

METHOD:

In all, 135 nursing staff participated. The course consisted of theory and hands-on training (hand-foot-, back massage). Focus-groups with 30/135 randomly chosen participants were conducted 4 weeks after the intervention. This study engaged a qualitative approach using content analysis.

RESULTS:

The overall opinion of the 1-day course was positive. The majority experienced the contents of the course to be adequate and sufficient for clinical care. They emphasized the pedagogical expertise as valuable for the learning process. The majority of nurses shared the opinion that their extended knowledge clarified their attitudes on STM as a complement in palliative care. Still, a few found it to be too basic and/or intimate. Three categories emerged during the analysis: experiences of and attitudes toward the education, experiences of implementing the skills in every-day care situations, and attitudes to the physical body in nursing care.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS:

The approach to learning and the pedagogical skills of the teacher proved to be of importance for how new knowledge was perceived among nurses. The findings may encourage hospital organizations to introduce short courses in STM as an alternative to more extensive education.

PMID: 18501049

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

28. The clinical efficacy of reflexology in nursing home residents with dementia.

Hodgson NA, Andersen S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18370580

 

Source

Center for Applied Research on Aging and Health, Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. nancy.hodgson@jefferson.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This experimental, repeated-measures, crossover design study with nursing home residents examined the efficacy of reflexology in individuals with mild-to-moderate stage dementia. Specifically, the study tested whether a weekly reflexology intervention contributed to the resident outcomes of reduced physiologic distress, reduced pain, and improved affect.

SETTING:

The study was conducted at a large nursing home in suburban Philadelphia.

SAMPLE:

The sample included 21 nursing home residents with mild-to-moderate stage dementia randomly assigned to two groups.

INTERVENTIONS:

The first group received 4 weeks of weekly reflexology treatments followed by 4 weeks of a control condition of friendly visits. The second group received 4 weeks of friendly visits followed by 4 weeks of weekly reflexology.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The primary efficacy endpoint was reduction of physiologic distress as measured by salivary alpha-amylase. The secondary outcomes were observed pain (Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators) and observed affect (Apparent Affect Rating Scale).

RESULTS:

The findings demonstrate that when receiving the reflexology treatment condition, as compared to the control condition, the residents demonstrated significant reduction in observed pain and salivary alpha-amylase. No adverse events were recorded during the study period.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of reflexology as a treatment of stress in nursing home residents with mild-to-moderate stage dementia.

PMID: 18370580

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

29. Acute postoperative pain management using massage as an adjuvant therapy: a randomized trial.

Mitchinson AR, Kim HM, Rosenberg JM, Geisser M, Kirsh M, Cikrit D, Hinshaw DB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18086982

 

Source

Section of General Surgery, Geriatrics and Palliative Care Program, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, 2215 Fuller Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA.

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS:

Adjuvant massage therapy improves pain management and postoperative anxiety among many patients who experience unrelieved postoperative pain. Pharmacologic interventions alone may not address all of the factors involved in the experience of pain.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Indianapolis, Indiana.

PATIENTS:

Six hundred five veterans (mean age, 64 years) undergoing major surgery from February 1, 2003, through January 31, 2005.

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients were assigned to the following 3 groups: (1) control (routine care), (2) individualized attention from a massage therapist (20 minutes), or (3) back massage by a massage therapist each evening for up to 5 postoperative days. Main Outcome Measure Short- and long-term (> 4 days) pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, and anxiety measured by visual analog scales.

RESULTS:

Compared with the control group, patients in the massage group experienced short-term (preintervention vs postintervention) decreases in pain intensity (P = .001), pain unpleasantness (P < .001), and anxiety (P = .007). In addition, patients in the massage group experienced a faster rate of decrease in pain intensity (P = .02) and unpleasantness (P = .01) during the first 4 postoperative days compared with the control group. There were no differences in the rates of decrease in long-term anxiety, length of stay, opiate use, or complications across the 3 groups.

CONCLUSION:

Massage is an effective and safe adjuvant therapy for the relief of acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing major operations.

PMID: 18086982

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Free full text

 

30. Tactile stimulation associated with nursing care to individuals with dementia showing aggressive or restless tendencies: an intervention study in dementia care.

Skovdahl K, Sörlie V, Kihlgren M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20925872

 

Source

Senior Lecturer, Department of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, SwedenProfessor, Bodo University College, Professional Studies, Centre for Practical Knowledge, Bodo, NorwayProfessor, Centre for Nursing Science, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden and Neurotec Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Aim.  This study aimed to describe from documentation both the caregivers'  experiences of giving tactile stimulation to five people with moderate-to-severe dementia and who showed aggressive or restless  Clinical tendencies, and the changes seen in them. Background. experiences indicate that tactile stimulation can contribute to a feeling of trust and confirmation as well as to improving communication, promoting relaxation and easing pain. There is, however, very little scientific documentation of the effects of touch massage  From caregivers' documentation for people with dementia. Design. weeks) of experiences, the giving of tactile stimulation to five (28 randomly selected people with dementia showing aggressive or restless  The tendencies and the subsequent changes noticed. Method. documentation was analysed by using qualitative content analysis.  All residents displayed signs of positive feelings and Results. relaxation. The caregivers stated that they felt able to interact with the residents in a more positive way and that they felt they had a  Tactile stimulation can be warmer relationship with them. Conclusion. seen as a valuable way to communicating non-verbally, of giving feedback, confirmation, consolation or a feeling of being valuable and  Tactile stimulation has taken care of. Relevance to clinical practice. to be administered with respect and care, and given from a relational ethics perspective. Otherwise, there is a risk that tactile stimulation will be used merely as a technique instead of as a part of an effort to achieve optimal good, warm nursing care.

PMID: 20925872

[PubMed - in process]

 

31. A randomised study of the effects of massage therapy compared to guided relaxation on well-being and stress perception among older adults.

Sharpe PA, Williams HG, Granner ML, Hussey JR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17709060

 

Source

Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, 921 Assembly Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. pasharpe@sc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to assess the effects of massage compared to guided relaxation on stress perception and well-being among older adults.

DESIGN:

A randomised pilot study enrolled adults ages 60 and older to receive 50 min, twice weekly massage therapy or guided relaxation sessions. Questionnaires were administered at pre-test (1 week before the first session) and post-test (after the last session).

SETTING:

Participants came to the University of South Carolina campus for sessions. Adults aged 60 and older were recruited from community venues and were briefly screened by telephone for contraindications.

INTERVENTION:

Participants (n=54) received 50 min massage or guided relaxation sessions twice weekly for 4 weeks. The massage included Swedish, neuromuscular, and myofascial techniques. For the relaxation group, an appropriately trained assistant read a script to guide the participant in using visualization and muscle relaxation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The General Well-being Schedule is an 18-item scale with subscales measuring anxiety, depression, positive well-being, self-control, vitality, and general health. The Perceived Stress Scale is a 14-item scale assessing the degree to which situations in one's life are appraised as stressful during the past month.

RESULTS:

Significant improvements were found for the anxiety, depression, vitality, general health, and positive well-being subscales of the General Well-being Schedule and for Perceived Stress among the massage participants compared to guided relaxation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings indicate that massage therapy enhances positive well-being and reduces stress perception among community-dwelling older adults.

PMID: 17709060

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

32. The effectiveness of massage with and without dimethyl sulfoxide in preventing pressure ulcers: a randomized, double-blind cross-over trial in patients prone to pressure ulcers.

Duimel-Peeters IG, J G Halfens R, Ambergen AW, Houwing RH, P F Berger M, Snoeckx LH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17553503

 

Source

Department of Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiteit Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, the Netherlands. idu@bze7.azm.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although guidelines advise against massage, it is one of the methods widely regarded and used by nurses to prevent pressure ulcers (PU).

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of different variations of massage in preventing pressure ulcers.

METHODS:

A randomized, double-blind cross-over design, in which patients of nursing homes who are prone to PU underwent two of the three possible interventions; 'position changes only', 'massaging with an indifferent cream' and 'massaging with a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) cream'.

RESULTS:

The results of three interventions did not differ significantly. DMSO did not fulfil the expectations raised by literature and a previous pilot-study.

Comment in

PMID: 17553503

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

33. Policy for therapeutic massage in an academic health center: a model for standard policy development.

Myklebust M, Iler J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17532742

 

Source

University of Michigan Integrative Medicine, Clinical Services, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA. mmyklebu@umich..edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Massage is the most common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy used in hospitals in the United States. As such, it is often the first CAM therapy to be integrated with conventional medicine. However, few academic medical centers have a written standard policy to guide this integration. This lack of standard policy may impede institutions from offering massage therapy as a clinical service, and may put health care professionals and institutions at risk through a failure to clearly address criteria for practice credentials or malpractice liability.

OBJECTIVE:

To create a clinical policy for therapeutic massage that may be used as a template for development of policy in academic health centers.

RESULTS:

We present a clinical policy for therapeutic massage, developed by the University of Michigan Health System, that defines therapeutic massage, provides guidelines for the credentialing and professional conduct of massage therapists, lists indications and contraindications for therapeutic massage, and addresses malpractice in accordance with the specific culture and needs of academic health centers. This policy was created by health care professionals after review of existing evidence and consideration of national criteria for massage therapy. This policy is intended to be used as a template for the development of a standard policy for therapeutic massage by health system administrators, medical directors, and massage professionals, to support the integration of therapeutic massage within their institutions.

CONCLUSIONS:

With minor modifications of this policy by individual institutions, adoption of this policy may facilitate the thoughtful integration of this CAM therapy into academic health care settings, meeting the unique requirements of academic health care institutions while serving the needs of patients.

PMID: 17532742

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

34. Evidence-based psychological treatments for insomnia in older adults.

McCurry SM, Logsdon RG, Teri L, Vitiello MV.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17385979

 

Source

Department of Psychosocial and Community Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98115-2053, USA. smccurry@u.washington.edu

Abstract

The review describes evidence-based psychological treatments (EBTs) for insomnia in older adults. Following coding procedures developed by the American Psychological Association's Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology, two treatments were found to meet EBT criteria: sleep restriction-sleep compression therapy and multicomponent cognitive-behavioral therapy. One additional treatment (stimulus control therapy) partially met criteria, but further corroborating studies are needed. At the present time, there is insufficient evidence to consider other psychological treatments, including cognitive therapy, relaxation, and sleep hygiene education, as stand-alone interventions beneficial for treating insomnia in older adults. Additional research is also needed to examine the efficacy of alternative-complementary therapies, such as bright light therapy, exercise, and massage. This review highlights potential problems with using coding procedures proposed in the EBT coding manual when reviewing the existing insomnia literature. In particular, the classification of older adults as persons age 60 and older and the lack of rigorous consideration of medical comorbidities warrant discussion in the future.

((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

Comment in

PMID: 17385979

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

35. Alternatives in psychiatry. Therapeutic massage and the role of the nurse.

[Article in French]

Panchaud R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17285918

 

Source

raymond.panchaud@nant.ch

PMID: 17285918

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

36. Applying back massage protocol to promote an intensive care unit patient's quality of sleep].

[Article in Chinese]

Fang CS, Liu CF.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17160874

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Yung Kung Campus.

Abstract

This case report concerns the nursing experience of applying back massage to a patient in an intensive care unit (ICU) from 10 May, 2005, in order to improve the patient's quality of sleep. In order to collect information about his quality of sleep of the patient, the author used observation, interview and a Richards-Campbell sleep questionnaire (RCSQ). It was observed that, before massage, the patient's sleep quality was poor, which wa why the protocol with back massage was proposed. The results after back massage was applied that heart beat, respiration. oxygen saturation and blood pressure were not significantly improved. This was probably related to the patient's worry about having his endotracheal tube removed. The patient's perception of sleep, indeed, was obviously improved, a result which may have been related to his/her perception of comfort and care from the nurse. Applying back massage to an ICU patient may therefore be regarded as helpful improving the patient's sleep quality. It is hoped that this case report may serve as a positive reference for health care providers so that it may help patients to recover fully through rest and sleep. Since this report concerned only one patient, however, to understand the real outcome of how back massage could improve the quality of sleep of ICU patients, research is planned on the use of back massage protocol on a large number os such patients.

PMID: 17160874

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

37. Integrating Swedish massage therapy with primary health care initiatives as part of a holistic nursing approach.

Willison KD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17105695

 

Source

Institute for Life Course and Aging, University of Toronto, 222 College Street, Suite 106, Toronto, Ont., Canada. kevinwillison2003@yahoo.ca

Abstract

Nursing has long embraced a holistic approach to health care. Providing such an approach is also a goal embodied within many complementary therapy (CT) practices, such as Swedish massage therapy (SMT). Primary health care (PHC) reform initiatives as well often support a holistic approach to patient/client management. Presently, amongst the practices of nursing, a potential synergy between CTs and PHC domains has not as yet been adequately explored within the humanities and social/scientific literature. The purpose of this review is to address the potential of such a collaboration, as made feasible by incorporating an integrative medicine approach to enhance comprehensiveness of care, and in turn, holistic nursing.

PMID: 17105695

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

38. The effects of nurses' practicing of the HeartTouch technique on perceived stress, spiritual well-being, and hardiness.

Walker MJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16880411

 

Source

Lauterstein-Conway School of Massage, Austin, Texas, USA. walkerj@io.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To test the effects of nurses' practicing of the HeartTouch technique (internal method of changing thoughts and feelings) on their perceived stress, hardiness, and spiritual well-being.

METHOD:

Experimental (n = 58) and comparison (n = 40) groups received an education session discussing the effects of thoughts and feelings on stress and health, with the experimental group also learning HeartTouch and practicing it for 1 month.

FINDINGS:

ANCOVA produced no statistically significant between-group differences. Effect sizes ranged from .14 to .35, indicating practical significance, suggesting that nurses who practiced HeartTouch likely noticed a greater improvement in outcome variables than nurses who did not practice HeartTouch. In the experimental group, statistically significant within-group differences were seen in all variables, with effect sizes ranging from .25 to .89. In the comparison group, statistically significant within-group differences were seen in two variables.

IMPLICATIONS:

Learning about the power of thoughts and feelings and using HeartTouch to change them can reduce stress and increase hardiness and spiritual well-being.

Comment in

 

PMID: 16880411

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

39. Literature review of back massage and similar techniques to promote sleep in elderly people.

[Article in German]

Schiff A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16821325

 

Source

Universität Witten/Herdecke, Institut für Pflegewissenschaft, Frankfurt. AndreaSchiff@aol.com

Abstract

Insomnia is a frequent problem among elderly people. As a consequence, sedative hypnotic drugs are prescribed very often that can lead to problematic effects. As an alternative to sedative hypnotic drugs nurses use relaxing interventions to promote sleep. One of these techniques, the back massage, is very popular because of the expected relaxing effect of touch. Against this background, this review includes 16 surveys of the international nursing literature and the German literature until the year 2004, that analyse the most common intervention in Germany, the "Atemstimulierende Einreibung" (similar to Effleurage). These studies are presented and evaluated. The results indicate that these interventions promote relaxation and sleep and that they are perceived as very pleasant by the elderly. However; they do not explain in detail the reasons for effects these and the role of touch. This review shows that further research (RCTs) is necessary to determine the effects of back massage and "Atemstimulierende Einreibung" on relaxation and sleep.

PMID: 16821325

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

40. The effectiveness of a 15 minute weekly massage in reducing physical and psychological stress in nurses.

Bost N, Wallis M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16800217

 

Source

Griffith University Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effectiveness of massage therapy in reducing physiological and psychological indicators of stress in nurses employed in an acute care hospital.

DESIGN:

Randomised controlled trial.

SETTING:

Acute care hospital in Queensland.

SUBJECTS:

Sixty nurses were recruited to the five week study and randomly assigned to two groups.

INTERVENTION:

A 15 minute back massage once a week. The control group did not receive any therapy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Demographic information, a life events questionnaire and a brief medical history of all participants was completed at enrolment. Physiological stress was measured at weeks one, three and five by urinary cortisol and blood pressure readings. Psychological stress levels were measured at weeks one and five with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI).

RESULTS:

Differences in the change in urinary cortisol and blood pressure between the two groups did not reach statistical significance. However, STAI scores decreased over the five weeks for those participants who received a weekly massage. The STAI scores of the control group increased over the five week period. These differences between the groups were statistically significant.

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study suggest that massage therapy is a beneficial tool for the health of nurses as it may reduce psychological stress levels. It is recommended that further large studies be conducted to measure the symptoms of stress rather than the physiological signs of stress in nurses.

PMID: 16800217

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

41. Effects of hand massage on comfort of nursing home residents.

Kolcaba K, Schirm V, Steiner R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16638478

 

Source

College of Nursing, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

Patient comfort is a goal of therapeutic nursing practice and a primary nursing function. Residents in nursing homes have many comfort needs including physical, psychospiritual, sociocultural, and environmental. These comfort needs are addressed by various caregivers including nurses, nursing assistants, and family members. Hand massage is a simple comfort intervention that can be incorporated readily into routine nursing care activities and conveys caring through touch, individual attention, and presence. As an intervention, hand massage promotes comfort and facilitates communication between care recipients and caregivers. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of hand massage as an intervention that affects nursing home residents' comfort and satisfaction. Results are presented for 35 participants who received hand massage and 25 participants in a comparison group. Findings showed no significant differences in comfort levels or satisfaction with care over time. Significant group differences, however, were found for comfort and satisfaction when measured at specific time periods. The discussion highlights these mixed findings and presents implications for further development of hand massage as part of nursing home residents' care.

PMID: 16638478

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

42. Massage to prevent pressure ulcers: knowledge, beliefs and practice. A cross-sectional study among nurses in the Netherlands in 1991 and 2003.

Duimel-Peeters IG, Hulsenboom MA, Berger MP, Snoeckx LH, Halfens RJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16553756

 

Source

Department of Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiteit Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands. ig.duimel@igz.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pressure ulcers are a major problem in all areas of health care in the Netherlands. National guidelines for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were originally developed in 1985 and revised in 1991 and 2002. The value of these guidelines can be questioned because it seems they are not in line with the beliefs and practice of the caregivers and only 5% of them are evidence-based.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To get a better insight into nurses' current knowledge, beliefs and performed practices relating to massage, a study was designed to assess changes in these three aspects after the publication of the 2002 Dutch national guidelines. The outcome was compared with the situation in 1991, the year in which the previous guidelines were published.

DESIGN AND METHOD:

A cross-sectional comparative study was designed using written questionnaires. Questions were formulated regarding knowledge and beliefs about prevention methods and the actual use of these methods in the prevention of pressure ulcers. The 2003-survey population consisted of nurses working in the Netherlands and was approached at random via subscriptions to Nursing News (i.e. Verpleegkunde Nieuws), a Dutch professional journal or via affiliations to an institution participating in the 2003 National Prevalence Survey of Pressure Ulcers.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Compared with the 1991 findings, the 2003 results show an improvement for the topic of pressure ulcers, but a deterioration regarding dehydration. It is obvious that the knowledge of the current CBO-guidelines on massage is still not widely distributed as it should be. Our overall conclusion is that the differences in responses between 1991 and 2003 are significant and suggest that the nurses were better informed in 2003.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

For the improvement of health care in the domain of pressure ulcer preventions, we need more than an accurate implementation of new or existing guidelines. Guidelines should also be based on qualitative, methodological well-designed studies to be evidence-based.

PMID: 16553756

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

43. The effects of foot reflexion massage on sleep disturbance, depression disorder, and the physiological index of the elderly.

[Article in Korean]

Song RH, Kim DH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16520560

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Daejeon Health Science College, Korea. rhsong@hit.ac.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was to examine the effects of foot reflexion massage on sleep disturbance, depression disorder, and the physiological index of the elderly in nursing homes.

METHOD:

The research design was a non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study. The subjects in this study were 50 elderly people who resided in two different nursing homes in the same region. An experimental group and a control group were organized with 25 subjects respectively, and foot reflexion massage was provided for 12 sessions, 30 minutes per session. The selected dependent variables were sleep disturbance, depression disorder, and physiological indices(blood plasma serotonin, serum cortisol), which were all measured before and after foot reflexion massage was offered. Data analysis included chi2-test, t-test, paired t-test, and ANCOVA, using the SPSS program package.

RESULT:

1. The experimental group improved sleep quality more than the control group. 2. The experimental group had less depression disorder than the control group. 3. The experimental group had higher serotonin levels than the control group.

CONCLUSION:

It's necessary to give foot reflexion massage as a successful nursing intervention to elderly who undergo a change in sleep, and suffer from a depression disorder due to a deterioration in sleep.

PMID: 16520560

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

44. A randomized controlled trial of meditation and massage effects on quality of life in people with late-stage disease: a pilot study.

Williams AL, Selwyn PA, Liberti L, Molde S, Njike VY, McCorkle R, Zelterman D, Katz DL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16238507

 

Source

Yale Prevention Research Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06418, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Certain meditation practices may effectively address spiritual needs near end-of-life, an often overlooked aspect of quality of life (QOL). Among people subject to physical isolation, meditation benefits may be blunted unless physical contact is also addressed.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate independent and interactive effects of Metta meditation and massage on QOL in people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled blinded factorial pilot trial conducted from November 2001 to September 2003.

SETTING:

An AIDS-dedicated skilled nursing facility in New Haven, Connecticut.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifty-eight residents (43% women) with late stage disease (AIDS or comorbidity).

INTERVENTIONS:

Residents were randomized to 1 month of meditation, massage, combined meditation and massage, or standard care. The meditation group received instruction, then self-administered a meditation audiocassette daily. A certified massage therapist provided the massage intervention 30 minutes per day 5 days per week.

OUTCOME MEASURE:

Changes on Missoula-Vitas QOL Index overall and transcendent (spiritual) scores at 8 weeks. Results: The combined group showed improvement in overall (p = 0.005) and transcendent (p = 0.01) scores from baseline to 8 weeks, a change significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the meditation, massage, and control groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

The combination of meditation and massage has a significantly favorable influence on overall and spiritual QOL in late-stage disease relative to standard care, or either intervention component alone.

PMID: 16238507

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

45. The effects of massage as a method to prevent pressure ulcers. A review of the literature.

Duimel-Peeters IG, Halfens RJ, Berger MP, Snoeckx LH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16089061

 

Source

Department of Health Care Studies, Section Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiteit Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. i.duimel@zw.unimaas.nl

Abstract

General information about the effects of massage to prevent pressure ulcers is limited. A literature search was conducted to provide more detailed knowledge about the effects of massage in general and in preventing the development of pressure ulcers in particular. Using the keywords massage, rubbing, prevention of pressure ulcers/pressure ulcers, and paying particular attention to referenced articles yielded a summary of different manual massage techniques and indications/contraindications of this intervention for both healthy tissues and tissues in patients at risk for developing pressure ulcers. A careful review of this information; the clinical, physical, and pathophysiological aspects of pressure ulcers, including extrinsic and intrinsic factor; and the time-pressure relationship suggests that one type of massage may be beneficial for persons who are at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Specifically, effleurage applied with moderate pressure is the most preferred massage in the treatment of pressure ulcers, although based on currently existing studies, it cannot be proven statistically that massage is an adequate preventive method for pressure ulcers. Although many guidelines advised against use of massage in people at risk for pressure ulcers, current evidence suggests that research to increase knowledge about the mechanism behind the effects of massage as part of an individualized prevention and treatment plan should be conducted.

PMID: 16089061

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  

46. Implementation of a massage therapy program in the home hospice setting.

Polubinski JP, West L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16043014

 

Source

The Hospice Institute of the Florida Suncoast, 300 East Bay Drive, Largo, FL 33770-3770, USA.

PMID: 16043014

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

47. Massage for prevention of decubitus ulcer?--2: Comparison of 3 interventions.

[Article in German]

Duimel-Peeters IG, Halfens RJ, Snoeckx LH, Berger MP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16013288

 

Source

Universiteit Maastricht, Faculty of Health Sciences, Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, The Netherlands.

PMID: 16013288

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

48. Massage for preventing decubitus ulcer? 1: Guidelines are still not adequately integrated into general practice.

[Article in German]

Duimel-Peeters IG, Halfens RJ, Berger MP, Snoeckx LH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15945579

 

Source

Universiteit Maastricht, Faculty of Health Sciences, Health Care Studies/Section Nursing Science, The Netherlands.

PMID: 15945579

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

49. Effects of home massage rehabilitation therapy for the bed-ridden elderly: a pilot trial with a three-month follow-up.

Hirakawa Y, Masuda Y, Kimata T, Uemura K, Kuzuya M, Iguchi A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15704505

 

Source

Department of Geriatrics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan. y.hirakawa@k8.dion.ne.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the effects of home massage rehabilitation therapy on the bed-ridden elderly.

DESIGN:

Alternatively allocated trial.

SETTING:

Subjects' homes, three home nursing stations, 13 visit care stations and one day service centre in Aichi prefecture, Japan.

SUBJECTS:

Bed-ridden patients who were 65 years and above, no dementia, stable general condition, and receiving no rehabilitation therapy.

INTERVENTION:

Thirty-minute sessions of home massage rehabilitation therapy by a massage practitioner 2 or 3 days a week for three consecutive months or usual care.

MAIN MEASUREMENTS:

Barthel Index (BI), Subjective Satisfaction and Refreshment Scale, Apathy Scale and Self-rating Depression Score.

RESULTS:

Fifty-three subjects were recruited, 26 in the home massage rehabilitation group (HMG) and 27 in the routine care group without massage (RCG). The protocol was completed for 40 subjects, 22 in the HMG and 18 in the RCG. There were no significant differences between the baseline characteristics of both groups; age, presence of spouse, diseases associated with disabilities and use of day care rehabilitation (p = 0.76, 0.36, 0.94 and 0.71, respectively). The total BI score of the HMG (15.27+/-4.51) at baseline was nonsignificantly lower (p= 0.03) than those of the RCG (11.44+/-5.90). Subjective Satisfaction and Refreshment Scale, Apathy Scale and Self-rating Depression Score of both groups at baseline were matched (p = 0.12, 0.32 and 0.89, respectively). There were no statistical differences between the intergroup changes over time in BI, Subjective Satisfaction and Refreshment Scale, Apathy Scale and Self-rating Depression Score (p = 0.35, 0.08, 0.70 and 0.55, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Home massage rehabilitation therapy did not show a positive effect on the bed-ridden elderly, either mentally or physically. We would require large-size trials to determine whether it is effective.

PMID: 15704505

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

50. Effects of hand massage and hand holding on the anxiety in patients with local infiltration anesthesia.

[Article in Korean]

Oh HJ, Park JS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15613828

 

Source

Kwak's Hospital Operating Room, Dague 700-734, Korea. ohj28@hanmail.net

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was to examine the effects of hand massage and hand holding as nursing interventions on the anxiety in patients with local infiltration anesthesia.

METHOD:

The design of this study was a nonequivalent, control group, non- synchronized design. The subjects of this study consisted of 15 patients for the hand group, 15 patients for the hand holding group and 17 patients for the control group awaiting surgery in the operation room of a general hospital in Daegu. As an experimental treatment, hand massage was carried out by the Hand Massage Protocol developed by Snyder (1995) and interpreted by Cho (1998) and hand holding developed by Cho (1998). The data were analyzed by SPSS/WIN, T-test, ANOVA, Cronbach's alpha, and the Scheffe test.

RESULTS:

The hand massage group and hand holding group were more effective than the control group in reducing anxiety, VAS score, systolic blood pressure and pulse rate.

CONCLUSION:

Hand massage and hand holding are effective nursing interventions that alleviates the psychological and physiological anxiety of patients with local infiltration anesthesia. In particular, the simple contact of hand holding is regarded as an effective and easily accessible nursing intervention in the operating room.

PMID: 15613828

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

51. The effects of slow-stroke back massage on anxiety and shoulder pain in elderly stroke patients.

Mok E, Woo CP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15519938

 

Source

Department of Nursing, School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. hsemok@inet.polyu.edu.hk

Abstract

This study explores the effect of slow-stroke back massages on anxiety and shoulder pain in hospitalized elderly patients with stroke. An experimental quantitative design was conducted, comparing the scores for self-reported pain, anxiety, blood pressure, heart rate and pain of two groups of patients before and immediately after, and three days after the intervention. The intervention consisted of ten minutes of slow-stroke back massage (SSBM) for seven consecutive evenings. One hundred and two patients participated in the entire study and were randomly assigned to a massage group or a control group. The results revealed that the massage intervention significantly reduced the patients' levels of pain perception and anxiety. In addition to the subjective measures, all physiological measures (systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate) changed positively, indicating relaxation. The prolonged effect of SSBM was also evident, as reflected by the maintenance of the psycho-physiological parameters three days after the massage. The patients' perceptions of SSBM, determined from a questionnaire, revealed positive support for SSBM for elderly stroke patients. The authors suggest that SSBM is an effective nursing intervention for reducing shoulder pain and anxiety in elderly patients with stroke. From a nursing perspective, this nursing practice provides a challenge and an opportunity for nurses and family caregivers to blend alternative therapies with technology to provide more individualized and holistic patient care.

PMID: 15519938

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

52. Foot and hand massage as an intervention for postoperative pain.

Wang HL, Keck JF.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15297952

 

Source

Clarian Health Partners, Methodist Hospital, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. hswang@iupui.edu

Abstract

Physiological responses to pain create harmful effects that prolong the body's recovery after surgery. Patients routinely report mild to moderate pain even though pain medications have been administered. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to supplement postoperative pain relief using pharmacologic management. Foot and hand massage has the potential to assist in pain relief. Massaging the feet and hands stimulates the mechanoreceptors that activate the "nonpainful" nerve fibers, preventing pain transmission from reaching consciousness. The purpose of this pretest-posttest design study was to investigate whether a 20-minute foot and hand massage (5 minutes to each extremity), which was provided 1 to 4 hours after a dose of pain medication, would reduce pain perception and sympathetic responses among postoperative patients. A convenience sample of 18 patients rated pain intensity and pain distress using a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale. They reported decreases in pain intensity from 4.65 to 2.35 (t = 8.154, p <.001) and in pain distress from 4.00 to 1.88 (t = 5.683, p <.001). Statistically significant decreases in sympathetic responses to pain (i.e., heart rate and respiratory rate) were observed although blood pressure remained unchanged. The changes in heart rate and respiratory rate were not clinically significant. The patients experienced moderate pain after they received pain medications. This pain was reduced by the intervention, thus supporting the effectiveness of massage in postoperative pain management. Foot and hand massage appears to be an effective, inexpensive, low-risk, flexible, and easily applied strategy for postoperative pain management.

PMID: 15297952

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

53. Effects of slow-stroke massage as complementary treatment of depressed hospitalized patients].

[Article in German]

Müller-Oerlinghausen B, Berg C, Scherer P, Mackert A, Moestl HP, Wolf J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15188088

 

Source

Kliniken im Theodor-Wenzel-Werk, Chefarzt Abt. Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Berlin. bmoe@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Among methods of complementary treatment of depression, massage plays an important role, at least in the U.S.A. Although there are some pointers to the antidepressive and anxiolytic action of slow-stroke massage in various randoms studies of patient cohorts, there have been no controlled trials of depressed hospitalized patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

32 depressed patients (24 women, 8 men; average 48 years - coveringthe entire spectrum of affective disorders listed in the ICD but without comorbidity in axis 2) with a minimum BRMS score of 16,7 - were included in the study. The randomized cross-over trial involved three massage sessions at set times (M) and sessions in two control groups (C) (relaxation and perception) lasting for 60 min 2-3 days apart. Under the control conditions there was no touching. The effects of depression-specific variables (e.g. mood, drive, abnormal cognition, as well as typical progress variables of the slow-stroke massage (bodily awareness, general state of health, etc.) were measured by both the patients' own assessment and that of an independent observer.

RESULTS:

Under condition of both M and C, comparison of before and after effects, there was not only the primarily postulated mood-enhancing effect, but also some very marked changes in almost all dimension, the mean improvement ratio under M often being stronger than under C. After Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, the statistical significance there remained the stronger effect of M in four dimensions (global tenseness, restlessness, depressed mood, neck/shoulder tension). The intensive effect of M compared with C was confirmed by both female and male patients regarding the answers to various open questions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Slow-stroke massage is suitable for adjuvant acute treatment of patients with depression. It is very readily accepted also by very ill patients. In relation to the skin as an organ that aids identity, non-hedonic depressed patients are able to recognize the sensory quality of therapeutic touching as a positive stimulus. In view of the latent period of many weeks and the only moderate efficacy of antidepressants, the described complementary method, which does not require physiotherapeutic training, should be more often applied in both a hospital and general practice setting.

PMID: 15188088

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

54. Massage as adjuvant therapy in the management of acute postoperative pain: a preliminary study in men.

Piotrowski MM, Paterson C, Mitchinson A, Kim HM, Kirsh M, Hinshaw DB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14644293

 

Source

Performance Improvement Department, VA Ann Arbor Health Care System, MI 48105, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Opioid analgesia alone may not fully relieve all aspects of acute postoperative pain. Complementary medicine techniques used as adjuvant therapies have the potential to improve pain management and palliate postoperative distress.

STUDY DESIGN:

This prospective randomized clinical trial compared pain relief after major operations in 202 patients who received one of three nursing interventions: massage, focused attention, or routine care. Interventions were performed twice daily starting 24 hours after the operation through postoperative day 7. Perceived pain was measured each morning.

RESULTS:

The rate of decline in the unpleasantness of postoperative pain was accelerated by massage (p = 0.05). Massage also accelerated the rate of decline in the intensity of postoperative pain but this effect was not statistically significant. Use of opioid analgesics was not altered significantly by the interventions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage may be a useful adjuvant therapy for the management of acute postoperative pain. Its greatest effect appears to be on the affective component (ie, unpleasantness) of the pain.

PMID: 14644293

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

55. Using massage and music therapy to improve postoperative outcomes.

McRee LD, Noble S, Pasvogel A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14507122

 

Source

University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, USA.

Abstract

An experimental pilot study was conducted to investigate the effects of preoperative massage and music therapy on patients' preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative experiences. Participants were assigned randomly to one of four groups--a group that received massage with music therapy, a group that received massage only, a group that received music therapy only, or a control group. Hemodynamics, serum cortisol and prolactin levels, and anxiety were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Postoperative anxiety levels were significantly lower and postoperative prolactin levels were significantly higher for all groups.

PMID: 14507122

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

56. The healing potential of back massage.

Gauthier DM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12904452

 

Source

University of Texas Medical Branch, School of Nursing, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. dogauthi@utmb.edu

Abstract

The experience of illness and/or hospitalization often elicits a stress response which may manifest as sleep disturbances, increased heart rate, increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, anxiety and general discomfort. The diagnosis and treatment of a person's response to illness or other event is a key tenet of nursing. The well-established nursing intervention, back rub or back massage, has been utilized as a time-honored comfort measure. This research review summarizes the studies that have evaluated the effect of massage on psychophysiologic outcome measures. Research demonstrates that back massage has the ability to elicit a relaxation response in the majority of study subjects.

PMID: 12870093

[PubMed]