1.    Incorporation of massage into psychotherapy: an integrative and conjoint approach.

Chin J Integr Med. 2011 Feb;17(2):154-8. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Posadzki P, Parekh-Bhurke S.

 

Source

Department of Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter & Plymouth, 25 Victoria Park Road, Exeter, EX2 4NT, UK. Paul.Posadzki@pcmd.ac.uk

Abstract

This article presents the potential integration of psychotherapy and massage when considering the essence of their beneficial effects. The essence of this model of practice is multifaceted, combining principles from anatomy, physiology and neuroscience with psychotherapy to benefit patient care. It has been advocated that possessing multidisciplinary knowledge from these areas of science enhances psychotherapists' holistic care of their depressive patients. A narrative review of the literatures and a qualitative, conceptual synthesis has been performed to create a new theoretical-pragmatic construct. This article introduces the concept of massage practice as a part of psychotherapy practice and presents the potential integration of psychotherapeutic knowledge with clinical decision-making and the management of depressive symptoms. The authors emphasize the usefulness of multi- and interdisciplinary knowledge in the psychotherapeutic process and explain how this knowledge might be extrapolated and incorporated into theoretical and practical settings to benefit depressive patients. The justification for this concept is also presented. The principles set out in this article may be a useful source of information for psychotherapists concerned about their patients' holistic well-being in addition to the psychopathology for which they have sought treatment. Researchers and psychotherapists can obtain valuable and additional knowledge through cross-fertilization of ideas across the arguments presented here.

PMID: 21390584

PubMed - in process

 

2.    Treatment effects of massage therapy in depressed people: a meta-analysis.

J Clin Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;71(7):894-901. Epub 2010 Mar 23.

Hou WH, Chiang PT, Hsu TY, Chiu SY, Yen YC.

Source

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, E-Da Hospital and College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

Objective

To systematically investigate the treatment effects of massage therapy in depressed people by incorporating data from recent studies.

Data sources

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of massage therapy in depressed people was conducted using published studies from PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL electronic database from inception until July 2008. The terms used for the search were derived from medical subheading term (MeSH) massage combined with MeSH depression. Hand searching was also checked for bibliographies of relevant articles. Retrieval articles were constrained to RCTs/clinical trials and human subjects. No language restrictions were imposed.

Study selection

We included 17 studies containing 786 persons from 246 retrieved references. Trials with other intervention, combined therapy, and massage on infants or pregnant women were excluded.

Data extraction

Two reviewers independently performed initial screen and assessed quality indicators by Jadad scale. Data were extracted on publication year, participant characteristics, and outcomes by another single reviewer.

Data synthesis

All trials showed positive effect of massage therapy on depressed people. Seventeen RCTs were of moderate quality, with a mean quality score of 6.4 (SD = 0.85). The pooled standardized mean difference in fixed- and random-effects models were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91) and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.52-0.93), respectively. Both indicated significant effectiveness in the treatment group compared with the control group. The variance between these studies revealed possible heterogeneity (tau(2) = 0.06, Cochran chi-squared(16) = 25.77, P = .06).

Conclusions

Massage therapy is significantly associated with alleviated depressive symptoms. However, standardized protocols of massage therapy, various depression rating scales, and target populations in further studies are suggested.

(c) Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

PMID: 20361919

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

3.    Chair massage for treating anxiety in patients withdrawing from psychoactive drugs.

J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Sep;16(9):979-87.

Black S, Jacques K, Webber A, Spurr K, Carey E, Hebb A, Gilbert R.

Source

Addiction Prevention and Treatment Services, Capital District Health Authority, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Abstract

Context

Therapeutic massage has been proven to be an effective, nonpharmacologic, alternative for managing state and trait anxiety in a variety of clinical situations. However, no controlled study has investigated this effect in an addiction treatment setting.

Aim

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of chair massage for reducing anxiety in persons participating in an inpatient withdrawal management program for psychoactive drugs.

Design

The design was a randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted from June 2008 to January 2009.

Subjects

Eighty-two (82) adult patients received inpatient treatment for psychoactive drug withdrawal (alcohol, cocaine, and opiates).

Setting

This study was conducted at the Withdrawal Management Services at the Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Interventions

Subjects were randomly assigned to receive chair massage (n = 40) or a relaxation control condition (n = 42). Treatments were offered for 3 consecutive days. Standard counseling and pharmacologic management were also offered concurrently to patients in all conditions.

Measurements

The primary outcome measure was anxiety assessed using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). State and trait anxiety scores were determined immediately prior to and following each treatment intervention.

Results

Analysis of STAI scores showed a significant reduction in state and trait anxiety for both interventions (p < 0.001). The magnitude in the reduction in state (p = 0.001) and trait (p = 0.045) anxiety was significantly greater in the chair massage group where the effect on state anxiety was sustained, at least in part, for 24 hours.

Conclusions

Within the clinical context of this study, chair massage was more effective that relaxation control in reducing anxiety. Further investigation of chair massage as a potential nonpharmacologic adjunct in the management of withdrawal related anxiety is warranted.

PMID: 20799900

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

4. Treatment effects of massage therapy in depressed people: a meta-analysis.

Hou WH, Chiang PT, Hsu TY, Chiu SY, Yen YC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20361919

 

Source

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, E-Da Hospital and College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To systematically investigate the treatment effects of massage therapy in depressed people by incorporating data from recent studies.

DATA SOURCES:

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of massage therapy in depressed people was conducted using published studies from PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL electronic database from inception until July 2008. The terms used for the search were derived from medical subheading term (MeSH) massage combined with MeSH depression. Hand searching was also checked for bibliographies of relevant articles. Retrieval articles were constrained to RCTs/clinical trials and human subjects. No language restrictions were imposed.

STUDY SELECTION:

We included 17 studies containing 786 persons from 246 retrieved references. Trials with other intervention, combined therapy, and massage on infants or pregnant women were excluded.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Two reviewers independently performed initial screen and assessed quality indicators by Jadad scale. Data were extracted on publication year, participant characteristics, and outcomes by another single reviewer.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

All trials showed positive effect of massage therapy on depressed people. Seventeen RCTs were of moderate quality, with a mean quality score of 6.4 (SD = 0.85). The pooled standardized mean difference in fixed- and random-effects models were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91) and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.52-0.93), respectively. Both indicated significant effectiveness in the treatment group compared with the control group. The variance between these studies revealed possible heterogeneity (tau(2) = 0.06, Cochran chi-squared(16) = 25.77, P = .06).

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage therapy is significantly associated with alleviated depressive symptoms. However, standardized protocols of massage therapy, various depression rating scales, and target populations in further studies are suggested.

(c) Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

PMID: 20361919

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

5. Effectiveness of therapeutic massage for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

Sherman KJ, Ludman EJ, Cook AJ, Hawkes RJ, Roy-Byrne PP, Bentley S, Brooks MZ, Cherkin DC.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20186971

 

Source

Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA. sherman.k@ghc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although massage is one of the most popular complementary and alternative medical (CAM) treatments for anxiety, its effectiveness has never been rigorously evaluated for a diagnosed anxiety disorder. This study evaluates the effectiveness of therapeutic massage for persons with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

METHODS:

Sixty-eight persons with GAD were randomized to therapeutic massage (n=23), thermotherapy (n=22), or relaxing room therapy (n=23) for a total of 10 sessions over 12 weeks. Mean reduction in anxiety was measured by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). Secondary outcomes included 50% reduction in HARS and symptom resolution of GAD, changes in depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8)), worry and GAD-related disability. We compared changes in these outcomes in the massage and control groups posttreatment and at 6 months using generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression.

RESULTS:

All groups had improved by the end of treatment (adjusted mean change scores for the HARS ranged from -10.0 to -13.0; P<.001) and maintained their gains at the 26-week followup. No differences were seen between groups (P=.39). Symptom reduction and resolution of GAD, depressive symptoms, worry and disability showed similar patterns.

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage was not superior to the control treatments, and all showed some clinically important improvements, likely due to some beneficial but generalized relaxation response. Because the relaxing room treatment is substantially less expensive than the other treatments, a similar treatment packaged in a clinically credible manner might be the most cost effective option for persons with GAD who want to try relaxation-oriented CAM therapies.

PMID: 20186971

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2922919

 

6. Soft tissue massage: early intervention for relatives whose family members died in palliative cancer care.

Cronfalk BS, Ternestedt BM, Strang P.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20492048

 

Source

Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences and Research and Development Department, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.cronfalk@ki.se

Abstract

AIM AND OBJECTIVES:

This paper explores how bereaved relatives experienced soft tissue massage during the first four months after the death of a family member who was in palliative cancer care.

BACKGROUND:

Death of a close family member or friend is recognised as being an emotional and existential turning point in life. Previous studies emphasise need for various support strategies to assist relatives while they are grieving.

DESIGN:

Qualitative design.

METHOD:

Eighteen bereaved relatives (11 women and seven men) received soft tissue massage (25 minutes, hand or foot) once a week for eight weeks. In-depth interviews were conducted after the end of the eight-week periods. Interviews were analysed using a qualitative descriptive content analysis method.

RESULTS:

Soft tissue massage proved to be helpful and to generate feelings of consolation in the first four months of grieving. The main findings were organised into four categories: (1) a helping hand at the right time, (2) something to rely on, (3) moments of rest and (4) moments of retaining energy. The categories were then conceptualised into this theme: feelings of consolation and help in learning to restructure everyday life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Soft tissue massage was experienced as a commendable source of consolation support during the grieving process. An assumption is that massage facilitates a transition toward rebuilding identity, but more studies in this area are needed.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Soft tissue massage appears to be a worthy, early, grieving-process support option for bereaved family members whose relatives are in palliative care.

Comment in

PMID: 20492048

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. A preliminary evaluation of a massage program for children who have been sexually abused and their nonabusing mothers.

Powell L, Cheshire A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20390784

 

Source

Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, England. lpowell24@btinternet.com

Abstract

The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot evaluation of the Mosac Massage Program, a novel program that uses massage to address some of the difficulties faced by children who have been sexually abused and their nonabusing parents. Interviews were conducted with four participating mothers immediately before and after the program. Benefits included improved bonding and communication between mother and child and a relaxing and enjoyable therapy for both mother and child. The program appeared to be a useful complement to talking therapies. Further evaluations are needed to confirm the potential benefits.

PMID: 20390784

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Evidence-based treatments in the rehabilitation of patients with depression--a literature review].

[Article in German]

Dirmaier J, Krattenmacher T, Watzke B, Koch U, Schulz H, Barghaan D.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20013572

 

Source

Institut und Poliklinik für Medizinische Psychologie, Zentrum für Psychosoziale Medizin, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf. dirmaier@uke.uni-hamburg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In recent years, the importance of guidelines has increased continuously. This development also occurs in the field of rehabilitative health care, where process guidelines are being designed for various indicational groups to ensure quality standards and improvements.

AIM:

The primary goal of this paper is to collect and evaluate the evidence for various treatment options for depressive disorders in order to establish a basis for the current development of a process guideline for the rehabilitation of patients with depressive disorders.

METHOD:

In order to identify evidence based treatment elements, first a comprehensive investigation of national and international guidelines was conducted. Thirteen selected guidelines were then assessed with regard to aspects of methodological quality and evidence-based treatment elements. In a further step, literature searches were conducted for residual treatment elements, which were identified on the basis of the Classification of Therapeutic Services (KTL) 2007. For the literature search, a hierarchical approach was chosen: At first, meta-analyses and systematic reviews were viewed. In case when there was still a lack of evidence for specific, potentially relevant treatment elements, the search was expanded to the level of primary studies. All selected reviews and primary studies then underwent a standardized assessment especially regarding methodological quality and evidence grades were allocated to treatments.

RESULTS:

Thereby, the following treatment elements with an adequate level of evidence were identified: Psychotherapeutic interventions, marital/couples/family therapy and counselling, inclusion of family members, psycho education and exercise, problem solving therapy, guided self-help, and behavioural activation treatments. On the basis of this complementary literature search, various other evident interventions could be identified within the following areas: relaxation techniques, improvement of social competence, occupational therapy, art therapies (music, movement/dance therapies), body-oriented therapies and massage therapy.

CONCLUSION:

In summary, using this hierarchical approach, it was possible to assign different levels of evidence to the various treatment elements for depression. Based on the results of this literature search, a next step in the development of a process guideline for the rehabilitative treatment of patients with depression will be the integration of experts in the field of rehabilitation.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

PMID: 20013572

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

9. Benefits of combining massage therapy with group interpersonal psychotherapy in prenatally depressed women.

Field T, Deeds O, Diego M, Hernandez-Reif M, Gauler A, Sullivan S, Wilson D, Nearing G.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19761951

 

Source

University of Miami School of Medicine, Touch Research Institute, FL 33101, United States. tfield@med.miami.edu

Abstract

One hundred and twelve pregnant women who were diagnosed depressed were randomly assigned to a group who received group Interpersonal Psychotherapy or to a group who received both group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and massage therapy. The group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (1h sessions) and massage therapy (20 min sessions) were held once per week for 6 weeks. The data suggested that the group who received psychotherapy plus massage attended more sessions on average, and a greater percentage of that group completed the 6-week program. The group who received both therapies also showed a greater decrease in depression, depressed affect and somatic-vegetative symptom scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), a greater decrease in anxiety scale (STAI) scores and a greater decrease in cortisol levels. The group therapy process appeared to be effective for both groups as suggested by the increased expression of both positive and negative affect and relatedness during the group therapy sessions. Thus, the data highlight the effectiveness of group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and particularly when combined with massage therapy for reducing prenatal depression.

PMID: 19761951

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC2785018

 

10. Massage in the management of agitation in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment.

Holliday-Welsh DM, Gessert CE, Renier CM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19345850

 

Source

Holliday Welsh & Associates, Duluth, MN, USA.

Abstract

This was a prospective study designed to examine the potential of massage to reduce agitation in cognitively impaired nursing home residents. Subjects were identified as susceptible to agitation by nursing home staff or by Minimum Data Set (MDS) report. Data was collected during baseline (3 days), intervention (6 days), and at follow-up. Five aspects of agitation were assessed: Wandering, Verbally Agitated/Abusive, Physically Agitated/Abusive, Socially Inappropriate/Disruptive, and Resists Care. At each observation, agitation was scored 5 times during the 1-hour window of observation. Subjects' agitation was lower during the massage intervention than at baseline (2.05 vs. 1.22, P < .001), and remained lower at follow-up. Of the 5 agitated behaviors examined in this study, massage was associated with significant improvement for 4: Wandering (0.38 vs. 0.16, P < .001), Verbally Agitated/Abusive (0.59 vs. 0.49, P = .002), Physically Agitated/Abusive (0.82 vs. 0.40, P < .001), and Resists Care (0.10 vs. 0.09, P = .022). When analysis was restricted to residents with significant levels of agitation at baseline, the observed effects of massage on agitation increased. Massage is an accessible, easily learned intervention that is effective in controlling some types of agitation in elders with cognitive impairment. Massage should be studied further as a nonpharmacological intervention in such patients.

PMID: 19345850

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

11. Light pressure massage for patients with severe anxiety.

Billhult A, Määttä S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19341988

 

Source

FoU-enheten i Södra Alvsborg, Borås, Sweden. annika.billhult@vgregion.se

Abstract

Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in the western world with a lifetime prevalence of 4.3 to 5.9% and is twice as common in women as in men. GAD can have a decisive impact on a patient's everyday life as it is surrounded by unfocused worries and the severe anxiety may interfere with normal social functions. The treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy and/or psychopharmacological drugs. In previous studies the positive effects of massage on anxiety have been shown. The present study described the experience of receiving massage for eight patients with GAD. Findings revealed that the patients were able to rediscover their own capacity during the massage period. This was illuminated by the experience of being relaxed in body and mind, the experience of unconditional attention, the experience of decreased anxiety and the experience of increased self-confidence. The paper ends with a discussion of clinical implications.

PMID: 19341988

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

12. Clinical ap[plications of massage therapy for the management of psychiatric disorders besides anxiety.

Kapoor S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18946941

 

Comment on

PMID: 18946941

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

13. Pilot study evaluating the effect of massage therapy on stress, anxiety and aggression in a young adult psychiatric inpatient unit.

Garner B, Phillips LJ, Schmidt HM, Markulev C, O'Connor J, Wood SJ, Berger GE, Burnett P, McGorry PD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18478478

 

Source

ORYGEN Research Centre, Parkville, Vic., Australia. belinda.garner@mh.org.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present pilot study was to examine the effectiveness of a relaxation massage therapy programme in reducing stress, anxiety and aggression on a young adult psychiatric inpatient unit.

METHOD:

This was a prospective, non-randomized intervention study comparing treatment as usual (TAU) with TAU plus massage therapy intervention (MT) over consecutive 7 week blocks (May-August 2006). MT consisted of a 20 min massage therapy session offered daily to patients during their period of hospitalization. The Kennedy Nurses' Observational Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE), the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and stress hormone (saliva cortisol) levels were used to measure patient outcomes at admission and discharge from the unit. The Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R) was used to monitor the frequency and severity of aggressive incidents on the unit.

RESULTS:

There was a significant reduction in self-reported anxiety (p < 0.001), resting heart rate (p < 0.05) and cortisol levels (p < 0.05) immediately following the initial and final massage therapy sessions. Significant improvements in hostility (p = 0.007) and depression scores (p < 0.001) on the SCL-90-R were observed in both treatment groups. There was no group x time interaction on any of the measures. Poor reliability of staff-reported incidents on the SOAS-R limited the validity of results in this domain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage therapy had immediate beneficial effects on anxiety-related measures and may be a useful de-escalating tool for reducing stress and anxiety in acutely hospitalized psychiatric patients. Study limitations preclude any definite conclusions on the effect of massage therapy on aggressive incidents in an acute psychiatric setting. Randomized controlled trials are warranted.

Comment in

PMID: 18478478

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Massage therapy for the treatment of depression: a systematic review.

Coelho HF, Boddy K, Ernst E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18081800

 

Source

Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Exeter, UK. helen.coelho@pms.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

People with depressive disorders or subsyndromal symptoms of depression (SSD) often use complementary and alternative therapies, including massage therapy (MT). This systematic review evaluates the evidence, from randomised clinical trials (RCTs), for the effectiveness of multiple sessions of classical European (Swedish) MT for the treatment of depression.

METHODS:

Eligible RCTs were identified via eight electronic databases and manual searches of references. Two reviewers independently selected trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data.

RESULTS:

Four RCTs met our inclusion criteria. Three of these RCTs compared MT with relaxation therapies, but provided insufficient data and analyses to contribute meaningfully to the evaluation of MT for depression. The fourth included RCT used MT as a control condition to evaluate a depression-specific acupuncture treatment. This trial provided limited evidence that, in the early stages of treatment, MT is less effective than acupuncture for treating depression, a treatment which itself is not accepted for this condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite previous research suggesting that MT may be an effective treatment for depression, there is currently a lack of evidence to support this assertion from RCTs that have selected participants for depression or SSD.

PMID: 18081800

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

15. Mindful awareness in body-oriented therapy for female veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder taking prescription analgesics for chronic pain: a feasibility study.

Price CJ, McBride B, Hyerle L, Kivlahan DR.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17985809

 

Source

Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Preliminary studies of body therapy for women in trauma recovery suggest positive results but are not specific to women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic pain.

OBJECTIVE AND PARTICIPANTS:

To examine the feasibility and acceptability of body-oriented therapy for female veterans with PTSD and chronic pain taking prescription analgesics.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A 2-group, randomized, repeated-measures design was employed. Female veterans (N=14) were recruited from a Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system in the Northwest United States (VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington). Participants were assigned to either treatment as usual (TAU) or treatment as usual and 8 weekly individual body-oriented therapy sessions (mindful awareness in body-oriented therapy group).

MEASURES:

Written questionnaires and interviews were used to assess intervention acceptability; reliable and valid measures were administered at 3 time points to evaluate measurement acceptability and performance; and within-treatment process measures and a participant post-intervention questionnaire assessed treatment fidelity.

INTERVENTION:

A body-oriented therapy protocol, "Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy" (MABT) was used. This is a mind-body approach that incorporates massage, mindfulness, and the emotional processing of psychotherapy.

RESULTS:

Over 10 weeks of recruitment, 31 women expressed interest in study participation. The primary reason for exclusion was the lack of prescription analgesic use for chronic pain. Study participants adhered to study procedures, and 100% attended at least 7 of 8 sessions; all completed in-person post-treatment assessment. Written questionnaires about intervention experience suggest increased tools for pain relief/relaxation, increased body/mind connection, and increased trust/safety. Ten of 14 responded to mailed 3-month follow-up. The response-to-process measures indicated the feasibility of implementing the manualized protocol and point to the need for longer sessions and a longer intervention period with this population.

PMID: 17985809

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC3037268

Free PMC Article

 

16. The efficacy of Slow Stroke Massage in depression.

[Article in German]

Müller-Oerlinghausen B, Berg C, Droll W.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17786889

 

Source

Brain Center Berlin. bmoe@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Abstract

Depression afflicts the whole organism, body as well as experience and behaviour. Therefore, therapeutic touch, i.e. a direct body-to-body approach might be helpful in depression, as it has been known and practiced in medicine centuries ago. We investigated the antidepressive effects of an one hour lasting, relaxing, very sensitive soft treatment (Slow Stroke Massage) in a double controlled study comparing massage with a control condition and also comparing effects in depressed patients vs. healthy subjects. The treatment was repeated 5 times within intervals of 2-3 days. Data of 32 acutely depressed in-patients was analyzed. The pre-post-differences in various dimensions were significantly greater during massage than during the control condition. They were also more marked in patients as compared to healthy subjects. CONCLUSION: Slow Stroke Massage can be used effectively and safely as a complimentary therapeutic strategy in depressed patients.

PMID: 17786889

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17. Rhythmical massage therapy in chronic disease: a 4-year prospective cohort study.

Hamre HJ, Witt CM, Glockmann A, Ziegler R, Willich SN, Kiene H. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17718646

 

Source

Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany. harald.hamre@ifaemm.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Rhythmical massage therapy is used in 24 countries but has not yet been studied in outpatient settings. The objective was to study clinical outcomes in patients receiving rhythmical massage therapy for chronic diseases.

DESIGN:

Prospective 4-year cohort study.

SETTING:

Thirty-six (36) medical practices in Germany.

PARTICIPANTS:

Eighty-five (85) outpatients referred to rhythmical massage therapy.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Disease and Symptom Scores (physicians' and patients' assessment, respectively, 0-10) and SF-36. Disease Score was measured after 6 and 12 months, and other outcomes after 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 months.

RESULTS:

Most common indications were musculoskeletal diseases (45% of patients; primarily back and neck pain) and mental disorders (18%, primarily depression and fatigue). Median disease duration at baseline was 2.0 years (interquartile range 0.5-6.0). Median number of rhythmical massage therapy sessions was 12 (interquartile range 9-12), and median therapy duration was 84 (49-119) days. All outcomes improved significantly between baseline and all subsequent follow-ups. From baseline to 12 months, Disease Score improved from (mean +/- standard deviation) 6.30 +/- 2.01 to 2.77 +/- 1.97 (p < 0.001), Symptom Score improved from 5.76 +/- 1.81 to 3.13 +/- 2.20 (p < 0.001), SF-36 Physical Component score improved from 39.55 +/- 9.91 to 45.17 +/- 9.88 (p < 0.001), and SF-36 Mental Component score improved from 39.27 +/- 13.61 to 43.78 +/- 12.32 (p = 0.028). All these improvements were maintained until the last follow-up. Adverse reactions to rhythmical massage therapy occurred in 4 (5%) patients; 2 patients stopped therapy because of adverse reactions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients receiving rhythmical massage therapy had long-term reduction of chronic disease symptoms and improvement of quality of life.

PMID: 17718646

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

18. Alternatives in psychiatry. Therapeutic massage and the role of the nurse.

[Article in French]

Panchaud R.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17285918

 

Source

raymond.panchaud@nant.ch

PMID: 17285918

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. Massage-physical therapy: helping the patient to reconcile with his body].

[Article in French]

Nadaud F.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16771283

 

Source

Institut Curie, Paris.

PMID: 16771283

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

20. Body-oriented therapy in recovery from child sexual abuse: an efficacy study.

Price C.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16189948

 

Source

School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

There has been little research on body therapy for women in sexual abuse recovery. This study examines body-oriented therapy--an approach focused on body awareness and involving the combination of bodywork and the emotional processing of psychotherapy.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the efficacy and the perceived influence on abuse recovery of body-oriented therapy. Massage therapy served as a relative control condition to address the lack of touch-based comparisons in bodywork research.

DESIGN:

A 2-group, repeated measures design was employed, involving randomization to either body-oriented therapy or massage group, conducted in 8, hour-long sessions by 1 of 4 research clinicians. Statistical and qualitative analysis was employed to provide both empirical and experiential perspectives on the study process.

SETTING:

Participants were seen in treatment rooms of a university in the northwestern United States and in clinician's private offices.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-four adult females in psychotherapy for child sexual abuse.

INTERVENTIONS:

Body-oriented therapy protocol was delivered in three stages, involving massage, body awareness exercises, and inner-body focusing process. Massage therapy protocol was standardized. Both protocols were delivered over clothes.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The outcomes reflected 3 key constructs--psychological well being, physical well-being, and body connection. Repeated measures included: Brief Symptom Inventory, Dissociative Experiences Scale, Crime-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale, Medical Symptoms Checklist, Scale of Body Connection and Scale of Body Investment. Results were gathered at 6 time points: baseline, 2 times during intervention, post-intervention, and at 1 month and 3 months follow-up, To examine the experiential perspective of the study process, written questionnaires were administered before and after intervention and at 1 month and 3 months follow-up.

RESULTS:

Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant improvement on all outcome measures for both intervention groups, providing support for the efficacy of body therapy in recovery from childhood sexual abuse. There were no statistically significant differences between groups; however, qualitative analysis of open-ended questions about participant intervention experience revealed that the groups differed on perceived experience of the intervention and its influence on therapeutic recovery.

PMID: 16189948

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PMCID: PMC1933482

Free PMC Article

 

21. Massage therapy improves the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

Reader M, Young R, Connor JP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15865498

 

Source

Hospital Alcohol and Drug Services, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Massage therapy has promise as an adjunct to standard alcohol detoxification procedures but has not been investigated comprehensively.

DESIGN:

The study was a randomized controlled trial comparing massage therapy to a "rest" (control) condition in patients undergoing alcohol detoxification.

SETTINGS/LOCATION:

Hospital-based alcohol and drug detoxification clinic.

SUBJECTS:

Fifty (50) patients with alcohol dependence (41 males, 9 females).

INTERVENTIONS:

The massage intervention involved a seated back, shoulder, head, and neck massage.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Alcohol Withdrawal Scale, respiration, pulse rate, and subjective patient evaluation.

RESULTS:

Those receiving massage generally showed reductions in pulse rate on 3 of the 4 days of treatment compared to the control group. Massage was also more effective in reducing Alcohol Withdrawal Scale scores in the early stages of the detoxification process. Respiration in the massage group was reduced toward the end of the detoxification admission.

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage shows promise as an adjunct to traditional medical detoxification for alcohol.

PMID:

15865498

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

22. Massage therapy effects on depressed pregnant women.

Field T, Diego MA, Hernandez-Reif M, Schanberg S, Kuhn C

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15715034

 

Source

Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33101, USA. tfield@med.miami.edu

Abstract

Eighty-four depressed pregnant women were recruited during the second trimester of pregnancy and randomly assigned to a massage therapy group, a progressive muscle relaxation group or a control group that received standard prenatal care alone. These groups were compared to each other and to a non-depressed group at the end of pregnancy. The massage therapy group participants received two 20 min therapy sessions by their significant others each week for 16 weeks of pregnancy, starting during the second trimester. The relaxation group provided themselves with progressive muscle relaxation sessions on the same time schedule. Immediately after the massage therapy sessions on the first and last days of the 16-week period the women reported lower levels of anxiety and depressed mood and less leg and back pain. By the end of the study the massage group had higher dopamine and serotonin levels and lower levels of cortisol and norepinephrine. These changes may have contributed to the reduced fetal activity and the better neonatal outcome for the massage group (i.e. lesser incidence of prematurity and low birthweight), as well as their better performance on the Brazelton Neonatal Behavior Assessment. The data suggest that depressed pregnant women and their offspring can benefit from massage therapy.

PMID: 15715034

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]