1.      The effects of massage therapy on dysmenorrhea caused by endometriosis.

Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res. 2010 Fall;15(4):167-71.

Valiani M, Ghasemi N, Bahadoran P, Heshmat R.

Source

Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Abstract

Background

Studying women's quality of life, we come across some harmful effects that factor such as dysmenorrhea caused by endometriosis leaves on their lives, their ability to work, their familial relations, and their self-confidence. Due to the repeated medical follow-ups and the side effects of medical therapies and endometriosis surgeries, many patients tend to use less expensive, nonmedical, and nonaggressive methods. The present study aimed to assess the effects of massage therapy, one of the aforementioned methods on endometriosis caused dysmenorrhea.

Methods

This was a semi-empirical clinical trial. Considering inclusion criteria, 23 patients suffering from endometriosis visited the Infertility Center of Isfahan, who were later confirmed by laparoscopy or laparotomy were picked as the sample through a simple method. The visual analog scale and McGill questionnaires were used once before and twice after the end of intervention for each patient. The data were analyzed using SPSS software.

Results

There was a statistically significant difference between the intensity of pain before the intervention started, immediately after, and also six weeks after it (p < 0.001).

Conclusions

According to the results of this study and confirmations of other ones, it seems that massage therapy can be a fitting method to reduce the menstrual pain caused by endometriosis.

PMID: 21589790

PubMed - in process

 

2.    Low back pain in pregnant women

Ginekol Pol. 2010 Nov;81(11):851-5. [Article in Polish]

Majchrzycki M, Mrozikiewicz PM, Kocur P, Bartkowiak-Wieczorek J, Hoffmann M, Stryła W, Seremak-Mrozikiewicz A, Grześkowiak E.

Source

Katedra i Klinika Rehabilitacji Uniwersytetu Medycznego w Poznaniu.

Abstract

Pain of lumbosacral segment of the vertebral column and the pelvis concerns about 45% of all pregnant women. The change of the body posture during pregnancy is the result of gravity centre relocation, which affects the musculosceletal system. Development of the joint, ligament and myofascial dysfunctions, as well as the pain in the lumbosacral segment and the pelvis, are the most common reasons of spine pain. The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge about lumbar spine pain in pregnant women with special focus on the pain connected with muscular, joint and ligament disorders. Pregnancy is a serious burden for the female osteo-skeletal system. Lumbar pain with different location and intensification is the negative consequence of the position changes during pregnancy. Pharmacotherapy could be useful only in cases of intensive low back pain, with possible application of small spectrum of drugs that are safe during pregnancy. Physical therapy including manual therapy exercises, massage and techniques of local anesthesia are alternative methods in case of low back pain in pregnant women.

PMID: 21365902

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

3.    Pregnancy and labor massage.

 Expert Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Mar;5(2):177-181.

Field T.

 

Source

Touch Research Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (D-820), PO Box 016820, Miami, FL 33101, USA.

Abstract

Massage therapy has been demonstrated to be effective during pregnancy. Women who received massage therapy reported decreased depression, anxiety, and leg and back pain. Cortisol levels decreased and, in turn, excessive fetal activity decreased, and the rate of prematurity was lower in the massage group. In a study of labor pain, women who received massage therapy experienced significantly less pain, and their labors were on average 3 h shorter with less need for medication. An underlying mechanism we have been exploring is that these effects are mediated by increased vagal activity. This likely occurs by the stimulation of pressure receptors that are innervated by vagal afferent fibers, which ultimately project to the limbic system, including hypothalamic structures involved in autonomic nervous system regulation and cortisol secretion.

PMID: 20479957

PubMed PMCID: PMC2870995

 

4.    Comparison between massage and music therapies to relieve the severity of labor pain.

Womens Health (Lond Engl). 2010 May;6(3):377-81.

Taghinejad H, Delpisheh A, Suhrabi Z.

Source

Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran.

Abstract

Background

During labor, women experience a high level of intense, stressful and steady pain that may negatively affect both mothers and neonates. Painkillers have previously been used for childbearing women, but nowadays, owing to some well-known limitations and serious side effects, nonpharmacologic methods such as massage and music therapies are being broadly recommended. The present clinical trial was conducted to compare the effects of massage and music therapies on the severity of labor pain in the Ilam province of western Iran.

Materials & Methods

Overall, 101 primigravidae who were hospitalized for vaginal delivery were recruited and randomly stratified into two groups of either massage (n = 51) or music (n = 50) therapies. Pain was measured using the visual analog scale and the two groups were compared in terms of pain severity before and after the interventions.

Results

Mothers in the massage therapy group had a lower level of pain compared with those in the music therapy group (p = 0.009). A significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of pain severity after intervention (p = 0.01). Agonizing, or most severe, labor pain was significantly relieved after massage therapy (p = 0.001).

Conclusion

Massage therapy was an effective method for reducing and relieving labor pain compared with music therapy and can be clinically recommended as an alternative, safe and affordable method of pain relief where using either pharmacological or nonpharmacological methods are optional.

PMID: 20426604

PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

5. Acupressure for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: a randomized, blinded study.

Belluomini J, Litt RC, Lee KA, Katz M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8041539

 

Source

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of acupressure in reducing nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.

METHODS:

Symptomatic pregnant women were randomized to one of two acupressure groups: one treatment group using an acupressure point (PC-6) and one sham control group using a placebo point. Subjects were blind to the group assignment. Each evening for 10 consecutive days, the subjects completed an assessment scale describing the severity and frequency of symptoms that occurred. Data from the first 3 days were used as pre-treatment scores. Beginning on the morning of the fourth day, each subject used acupressure at her assigned point for 10 minutes four times a day. Data from day 4 were discarded to allow 24 hours for the treatment to take effect. Data from days 5-7 were used to measure treatment effect.

RESULTS:

Sixty women completed the study. There were no differences between groups in attrition, parity, fetal number, maternal age, gestational age at entry, or pre-treatment nausea and emesis scores. Analysis of variance indicated that both groups improved significantly over time, but that nausea improved significantly more in the treatment group than in the sham control group (F1,58 = 10.4, P = .0021). There were no differences in the severity or frequency of emesis between the groups. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.261, P = .044) between maternal age and severity of nausea.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that acupressure at the PC-6 anatomical site is effective in reducing symptoms of nausea but not frequency of vomiting in pregnant women.

Comment in

PMID: 8041539

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

6. The effects of abdominal meridian massage on menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea in full-time employed women.

[Article in Korean]

Kim JS, Jo YJ, Hwang SK.

Source

Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to examine the effects of abdominal meridian(Kyongrak) massage on menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea.

METHOD:

Eighty-five women (of 110 screened) enrolled in this study and were employed full-time with more than 6.0 points (in 0-10.0 VAS scale) in menstrual cramps or more than 20 points on the dysmenorrhea scale (range 13-52). The forty-two participants in the experimental group received abdominal meridian massage for 5 minutes per day during 6 days from the fifth day before menstruation to the first day of menstruation and the forty-three participants in the control group didn't receive any treatment. Data were collected from June 1st to August 30th, 2003 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi2-test, and t-test.

RESULT:

Menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea of the experimental group were significantly lower after abdominal meridian massage than those of the control group (p<.001).

CONCLUSION:

Abdominal meridian(Kyongrak) massage was very effective for relief of menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea. Therefore, we suggest that abdominal Kyongrak massage can be a useful nursing intervention for women with menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea.

PMID: 16418559

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

7. The effects of shiatsu on post-term pregnancy.

Ingram J, Domagala C, Yates S.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15907673

 

Source

St. Michael's Hospital, United Bristol Healthcare Trust, Southwell St., Bristol BS2 8EG, UK. Jennifer.ingram@ubht.swest.nhs.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the effects of shiatsu techniques, as taught by hospital midwives, on the progress of post-term labours and deliveries, to inform practice.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A pilot audit on the use of shiatsu for post-term pregnancy at St. Michael's Hospital, Bristol, from March to July 2000.

INTERVENTIONS:

Sixty-six women, who attended a consultant clinic hospital appointment at 40 weeks gestation, were taught the massage techniques by one midwife, who had completed the shiatsu course. Seventy-six comparison women were those who attended similar clinics when the midwife was not on duty.

OUTCOMES:

The audit extracted outcome information from the Stork hospital database including induction, type of delivery, length of labour and analgesia used.

RESULTS:

Post-term women who used shiatsu were significantly more likely to labour spontaneously than those who did not (p=0.038). Of those who had used shiatsu, 17% more went into spontaneous labour compared to those who were not taught shiatsu.

PMID: 15907673

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

8. Effects of LI4 and BL 67 acupressure on labor pain and uterine contractions in the first stage of labor.

Chung UL, Hung LC, Kuo SC, Huang CL.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14685931

 

Source

National Taipei College of Nursing, No. 365 Ming-Te Road, Peitou, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

Acupressure is said to promote the circulation of blood and qi, the harmony of yin and yang, and the secretion of neurotransmitters, thus maintaining the normal functions of the human body and providing comfort. However, there has been little research-based evidence to support the positive effects of acupressure in the area of obstetric nursing. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of LI4 and BL67 acupressure on labor pain and uterine contractions during the first stage of labor. An experimental study with a pretest and posttest control group design was utilized. A total of 127 parturient women were randomly assigned to three groups. Each group received only one of the following treatments, LI4 and BL67 acupressure, light skin stroking, or no treatment/conversation only. Data collected from the VAS and external fetal monitoring strips were used for analysis. Findings indicated that there was a significant difference in decreased labor pain during the active phase of the first stage of labor among the three groups. There was no significant difference in effectiveness of uterine contractions during the first stage of labor among the three groups. Results of the study confirmed the effect of LI4 and BL67 acupressure in lessening labor pain during the active phase of the first stage of labor. There were no verified effects on uterine contractions.

PMID: 14685931

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

9. Ice massage for the reduction of labor pain.

Waters BL, Raisler J.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14526344

 

Source

SANE Project, LaPinon Rape Recovery Center, Las Cruces, NM, USA.

Abstract

The current study investigated the use of ice massage of the acupressure energy meridian point large intestine 4 (LI4) to reduce labor pain during contractions. LI4 is located on the medial midpoint of the first metacarpal, within 3 to 4 mm of the web of skin between the thumb and forefinger. A one-group, pretest, posttest design was chosen, which used 100-mm Visual Analog Scales (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) ranked numerically and verbally to measure pain levels; the pretest served as the control. Study participants were Hispanic and white Medicaid recipients who received prenatal care at a women's clinic staffed by certified nurse-midwives and obstetricians. Participants noted a pain reduction mean on the VAS of 28.22 mm on the left hand and 11.93 mm on the right hand. The postdelivery ranked MPQ dropped from number 3 (distressing) to number 2 (discomforting). The study results suggest that ice massage is a safe, noninvasive, nonpharmacological method of reducing labor pain.

PMID: 14526344

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

10. Effect of foot massage to decrease physiological lower leg oedema in late pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial in Turkey.

Coban A, Sirin A.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20854342

 

Source

Department of Midwifery, Aydin School of Health, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey. ayden.coban@adu.edu.tr

Abstract

This study aims to evaluate the effect of foot massage for decreasing physiological lower leg oedema in late pregnancy. Eighty pregnant women were randomly divided into two groups; study group had a 20 min foot massage daily for 5 days whereas the control group did not receive any intervention beyond standard prenatal care. The research was conducted between March and August 2007 in Manisa Province Health Ministry Central Primary Health Care Clinic 1, in Manisa, Western Turkey. Compared with the control group, women in the experimental group had a significantly smaller lower leg circumference (right and left, ankle, instep and metatarsal-phalanges joint) after 5 days of massage. The results obtained from our research show that foot massage was found to have a positive effect on decreasing normal physiological lower leg oedema in late pregnancy.

© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

PMID: 20854342

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

11. Depression, mood, stress, and Th1/Th2 immune balance in primary breast cancer patients undergoing classical massage therapy.

Krohn M, Listing M, Tjahjono G, Reisshauer A, Peters E, Klapp BF, Rauchfuss M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20644965

 

Source

Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany, michaela.krohn@charite.de.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Cancer patients frequently suffer from psychological comorbidities such as depression and elevated stress. Previous studies could demonstrate that cancer patients benefit from massage therapy on the physical and psychological level. This pilot study investigates the effects of massage on depression, mood, perceived stress, and the Th1/Th2 ratio in breast cancer patients.

METHODS:

Thirty-four breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to a massage group (n = 17) and a control group (n = 17). Patients of the massage group received two 30-min classical massages per week for 5 weeks. At baseline, at the end of the intervention period, and 6 weeks after the end of intervention, patients of both groups completed the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), and the Berlin Mood Questionnaire (BFS) and blood was withdrawn for determining cytokine concentrations and the Th1/Th2 ratio.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine patients were included in the statistical analysis. Depression (PHQ) and anxious depression (BSF) were significantly reduced immediately after massage compared to the control group. Stress (PSQ) and elevated mood (BSF) did not show significant alterations after massage therapy. Changes of cytokine concentrations and Th1/Th2 ratio were insignificant as well, although there was a slight shift towards Th1 in the massage group over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage therapy is an efficient treatment for reducing depression in breast cancer patients. Insignificant results concerning immunological parameters, stress, and mood indicate that further research is needed to determine psychological and immunological changes under massage therapy.

PMID: 20644965

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

12. Effectiveness of foot and hand massage in postcesarean pain control in a group of Turkish pregnant women.

Degirmen N, Ozerdogan N, Sayiner D, Kosgeroglu N, Ayranci U.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20643325

 

Source

Nursing College, Osmangazi University, 26480 Meselik-Eskisehir, Turkey.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of foot and hand massage on reducing postoperative pain in patients who had cesarean operation. This pretest-posttest design study was planned as a randomized controlled experimental study. In the light of the results, it was reported that the reduction in pain intensity was significantly meaningful in both intervention groups when compared to the control group. It was also noted that vital findings were measured comparatively higher before the massage in the test groups, and they were found to be relatively lower in the measurements conducted right before and after the massage, which was considered to be statistically meaningful. Foot and hand massage proved useful as an effective nursing intervention in controlling postoperative pain.

2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20643325

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

13. Uterine massage to reduce postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal delivery.

Abdel-Aleem H, Singata M, Abdel-Aleem M, Mshweshwe N, Williams X, Hofmeyr GJ.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20599196

 

Source

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women's Health Centre, Assiut University Hospital, Assiut, Egypt. aleemh@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of sustained uterine massage started before delivery of the placenta in reducing postpartum hemorrhage.

METHODS:

A randomized controlled trial conducted in Egypt and South Africa between September 2006 and February 2009. A total of 1964 pregnant women were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatment groups: intramuscular oxytocin, sustained uterine massage, or both treatments. Blood loss within 30 minutes of delivery was recorded.

RESULTS:

The incidence of blood loss of 300 mL or more within 30 minutes of delivery was significantly higher in the massage group than in the massage plus oxytocin (RR 1.88; 95% CI, 1.29-2.74 in Assiut, and RR 1.3; 95% CI, 1.00-1.68 in SA) and the oxytocin only group (RR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.11-2.61 in Assiut, and RR 2.24; 95% CI, 1.54-3.27 in SA). In both centers, use of additional uterotonics was significantly higher in the uterine massage group compared with the other 2 groups.

CONCLUSION:

Uterine massage was less effective than oxytocin for reducing blood loss after delivery. When oxytocin was used, there was no additional benefit from uterine massage. The effectiveness of uterine massage in the absence of oxytocin was not studied. ACTRN: 12609000372280.

Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20599196

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

14. Thiele massage as a therapeutic option for women with chronic pelvic pain caused by tenderness of pelvic floor muscles.

Montenegro ML, Mateus-Vasconcelos EC, Candido dos Reis FJ, Rosa e Silva JC, Nogueira AA, Poli Neto OB.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20590980

 

Source

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. montenegro_ml@hotmail.com

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

Musculoskeletal system has been found to be involved in genesis and perpetuation of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and has strong evidences that up to 80% of women with CPP present dysfunction of the musculoskeletal system. In this study, we report a series of women with CPP caused by tenderness of pelvic floor muscles successfully treated with Thiele massage.

METHODS:

Were included in this study six women with CPP caused by tenderness of the levator ani muscle that underwent transvaginal massage using the Thiele technique, over a period of 5 minutes repeated once a week for 4 weeks. After 1 month, the women returned for follow-up.

RESULTS:

The median tenderness score for the six women evaluated was 3 at the first evaluation and 0 after 1 month of follow-up (P < 0.01). The mean Visual Analogue Scale and McGill Pain Index scores were 8.1 and 34, respectively, at the first evaluation, and 1.5 and 16.6 at follow-up (P < 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

Thiele massage appears to be very helpful for women with CPP caused by tenderness of the levator ani muscle. However, these results are preliminary and a larger number of women are necessary to obtain more conclusive results.

© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

PMID: 20590980

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

15. Impact of a mechanical massage on gene expression profile and lipid mobilization in female gluteofemoral adipose tissue.

Marques MA, Combes M, Roussel B, Vidal-Dupont L, Thalamas C, Lafontan M, Viguerie N.

 

Source

Inserm, UMR 1048, Obesity Research Laboratory, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine Institute, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.

Abstract

Background: Gluteofemoral adipose tissue areas are known to be poorly metabolically reactive. Mechanical massage has previously been reported to show morphological and functional impact on this tissue. The present study was carried out to delve more deeply into the mechanistic considerations regarding the incidence of a mechanical massage technique on gene expression profile and β-adrenergic-mediated lipid mobilization in female femoral adipose tissue. Methods: Twelve premenopausal healthy women were included and received 12 sessions of calibrated mechanical massage (Endermologie®). Total RNA was extracted from femoral adipose tissue biopsies for gene expression studies. Microdialysis was carried out in the femoral adipose tissue in order to assess lipolytic responsiveness (via glycerol determination) and changes in local blood flow following perfusion of a lipolytic agent, isoproterenol. Evaluations were performed before and after the 6-week experimental period. Results: Mechanical massage initiated important modifications in gene expression profile. The lipid-mobilizing effect of isoproterenol was enhanced after the experimental period. Basal local blood flow and isoproterenol-induced vasodilatation were also improved. Conclusion: The protocol of mechanical massage used in the study promoted noticeable changes in the expression of genes involved in metabolic pathways. The lipolytic and local adipose tissue blood flow responses initiated by isoproterenol were significantly enhanced.

Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 21577019

[PubMed - in process]

 

16. Effects of self-foot reflexology on stress, fatigue and blood circulation in premenopausal middle-aged women

[Article in Korean]

Jang SH, Kim KH.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19901496

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Songwon College, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was to examine the effects of self-foot reflexology on stress, fatigue and blood circulation in premenopausal middle-aged women.

METHODS:

A quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group, pretest-posttest design was used. Participants were 59 premenopausal, middle-aged women in their 40s and 60s living in G city: 30 in the experiment group and 29 in the control group. Data were collected from May to August 2008. Self-foot reflexology was performed three times a week for 6 weeks for 40 min at each session.

RESULTS:

The results showed that self-foot reflexology was effective in reducing perceived stress and fatigue and helped blood circulation in premenopausal middle-aged women.

CONCLUSION:

Self-foot reflexology may be an effective nursing intervention in reducing perceived stress and fatigue and in improving blood circulation.

PMID: 19901496

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17. Effects of mechanical massage, manual lymphatic drainage and connective tissue manipulation techniques on fat mass in women with cellulite.

Bayrakci Tunay V, Akbayrak T, Bakar Y, Kayihan H, Ergun N.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19627407

 

Source

Hacettepe University, Faculty of Health Sciences Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, 06100 Ankara, Turkey. volgamel@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of three different noninvasive treatment techniques on fat mass and regional fat thickness of the patients with cellulites.

METHODS:

Sixty subjects were randomized into three groups. Group 1 (n = 20) treated with mechanical massage (MM), group 2 (n = 20) treated with manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) and group 3 (n = 20) treated with connective tissue manipulation (CTM) techniques. Subjects were evaluated by using standardized photographs, body composition analyzer (TBF 300) (body weight (BW), body mass index (BMI), fat %, fat mass (FM), fat free mass (FFM), total body water (TBW)), circumference measurement from thigh, waist-hip ratio (WHR), fat thickness measurements from abdomen, suprailium and thigh regions with skin fold caliper.

RESULTS:

All groups had an improvement in thinning of the subcutaneous fat after the treatment (P < 0.05). Thigh circumference decreased by an average of 0.5 cm in all groups and thigh fat thickness decreased 1.66 mm in Group 1, 2.21 mm in Group 2 and 3.03 mm in Group 3. Abdomen and suprailium fat thicknesses decreased 2.4 and 2.58 mm in Group 1, 1.78 and 2 mm in Group 2 and 1.23 and 0.64 mm in Group 3, respectively. The mean difference in waist-hip ratio was 0.1 cm in all groups.

CONCLUSION:

All the treatment techniques are effective in decreasing the regional fat values of the patients with cellulites.

PMID: 19627407

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

18. Massage therapy reduces physical discomfort and improves mood disturbances in women with breast cancer.

Listing M, Reisshauer A, Krohn M, Voigt B, Tjahono G, Becker J, Klapp BF, Rauchfuss M.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19189275

 

Source

Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10117 Berlin, Germany. miriam.listing@charite.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the efficacy of classical massage treatment in reducing breast cancer-related symptoms and in improving mood disturbances. METHODS. Women diagnosed with primary breast cancer were randomized into an intervention group and a control group. For a period of 5 weeks, the intervention group received bi-weekly 30-min classical massages in the back and head-neck areas. The control group received no additional treatment to their routine healthcare. To evaluate treatment efficacy, the following validated questionnaires were administrated at baseline (T1), at the end of the intervention (T2), and at a followup at 11 weeks (T3): the Short Form-8 Health Survey, the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire breast module (EORTC QLQ-BR23), the Giessen Complaints Inventory (GBB), and the Berlin Mood Questionnaire (BSF). RESULTS. Eighty-six eligible women (mean age: 59 years) were enrolled in the study. A significantly higher reduction of physical discomfort was found in the intervention group compared with the control group at T2 (p=0.001) and at T3 (p=0.038). A decrease in fatigue was also observed. Women in the intervention group reported significantly lower mood disturbances at T2 (p<0.01) but not at T3. The effect of treatment on mood disturbances was significantly higher if a patient was treated continuously by the same masseur. CONCLUSION. Classical massage seems to be an effective adjuvant treatment for reducing physical discomfort and fatigue, and improving mood disturbances in women with early stage breast cancer.

PMID: 19189275

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

19. The effects of abdominal meridian massage on menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea in full-time employed women.

[Article in Korean]

Kim JS, Jo YJ, Hwang SK.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16418559

 

Source

Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to examine the effects of abdominal meridian(Kyongrak) massage on menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea.

METHOD:

Eighty-five women (of 110 screened) enrolled in this study and were employed full-time with more than 6.0 points (in 0-10.0 VAS scale) in menstrual cramps or more than 20 points on the dysmenorrhea scale (range 13-52). The forty-two participants in the experimental group received abdominal meridian massage for 5 minutes per day during 6 days from the fifth day before menstruation to the first day of menstruation and the forty-three participants in the control group didn't receive any treatment. Data were collected from June 1st to August 30th, 2003 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi2-test, and t-test.

RESULT:

Menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea of the experimental group were significantly lower after abdominal meridian massage than those of the control group (p<.001).

CONCLUSION:

Abdominal meridian(Kyongrak) massage was very effective for relief of menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea. Therefore, we suggest that abdominal Kyongrak massage can be a useful nursing intervention for women with menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea.

PMID: 16418559

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

20. The effect of self-foot reflexology on the relief of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea in high school girls.

[Article in Korean]

Kim YS, Kim MZ, Jeong IS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15502445

 

Source

Department of Nursing, Dong-Eui University, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was aimed to identify the effect of self-foot reflexology on the relief of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea in high school girls.

METHOD:

Study subjects was 236 women residing in the community, teachers and nurses who were older than 45 were recruited. Data was collected with self administered questionnaires from July 1st to August 31st, 2003 and analysed using SPSS/WIN 10.0 with Xtest, t-test, and stepwise multiple logistic regression at a significant level of =.05.

RESULT:

The breast cancer screening rate was 57.2%, and repeat screening rate was 15.3%. With the multiple logistic regression analysis, factors associated with mammography screening were age and perceived barriers of action, and factors related to the repeat mammography screening were education level and other cancer screening experience.

CONCLUSION:

Based on the results, we recommend the development of an intervention program to decrease the perceived barrier of action, to regard mammography as an essential test in regular check-up, and to give active advertisement and education to the public to improve the rates of breast cancer screening and repeat screening.

PMID: 15502445

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]